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15

Your pallet board may not be worth the effort, but there are several techniques that you can try to salvage any warped board. The optimal solution will vary depending on how you intend to use the board. Wikipedia has a nice primer on specific types of defects in wood which fall under the blanket term of warping: bow : a warp along the length of the face of ...


14

If there is one thing I'm proficient at its pallet teardown. You have lots of options. It does all depend on the style of pallet you are working with and it some cases its wood composition (hard, soft, pine, oak.....). For argument sake lets say you are not using the close boarded types. Just a hammer Some pallets rely on gravity to hold them together. ...


13

Using the aforementioned work table, I had placed other wood below the work piece, to prop it up, but could not get a tight fit so everything just moved around. I think a simple mod here could get this method to work (I've used something similar myself when planing thinner stock many times) although it wouldn't be the primary way I'd suggest you go about ...


13

These can usually be easy to come by. Plenty of businesses view them as scrap and are glad for you taking them away. Pallets are a favorite among up-cyclers as a (usually) free source of material and its unique look and feel. That being said there are several points to consider when collecting pallet wood. Simple Inspection There are some basic things when ...


11

Metal patinas are a whole art unto themselves. I have used ammonia for brass, made stains with vinegar and so on. Sculptors spend a lot of time on this topic. Assuming your nails contain iron, then you are trying to form ferrous oxide, the black 'rust' (as opposed to the orange rust, ferric oxide). Almost any acid will do the trick. Acetic acid (vinegar) ...


9

I used a belt sander to remove most of the finish of some old tiger oak flooring before running it through the planer. 80 grit sand paper is cheaper than blades. But I did keep a set of old blades to use for the first pass on all of them. A metal detector is a great investment if you'll be doing a lot of reclaiming.


7

My plan was to basically put them on a flat surface, glue them up and clamp them together. Obviously this is a rough idea and I am looking for some advice before I glue myself to the floor. There's nothing essentially wrong with your plan, but there are some minor modifications that will make it go more smoothly. On a substantial glued panel like this, ...


7

If you do not need the exact thickness of the board you could just run it thorough a planer and or jointer to flatten it out. But if the board thickness is exactly what you need then I have seen a jig, it was a few years ago, that used steam and weights to straighten boards out, but this seems like a bit of overkill to me to create such a large jig (...


7

You could soak it in vinegar. I know that steel wool dissolves in vinegar and completely rusted.


7

If you can, check the moisture content of your material. I usually find that problem when the wood has a very high moisture content, say 15-20% and higher. A simple test is also feeling how cold the wood feels. Wet wood feels colder than dry wood.


7

Clawfoot hammer works just fine. Failing that a pair of pincers, pinch the nail as close to the wood as possible and then move front and back around the contact surface of the claws. The big problem is getting a grip on the nail heads especially when they are in deep. You can pry the boards apart by inserting a lever between them and wiggling. This way you ...


7

I would certainly worry about assembly in the cold, and anything you are going to glue needs to be above 50F for the glue to work properly anyway. Moisture is the bigger worry, and in the northern climes winter is pretty dry, add cold to that and you are looking at issues when the project warms up and is exposed to more moisture. So yes, I would recommend ...


6

Whether a peice of wood is worth it depends on how you are going to use it. If you want it for inlays then you don't need much viable wood. You just need enough to cut of the piece you want with a scroll- or band-saw. If you want to build a cabinet out of it then you will need a lot more. You can scrape of the finish with a chisel. Sharpen it and hold it ...


6

Most woodworkers I know, including myself, walk along with the board when jointing, to some extent; but for long boards they stay in one place either at the infeed or outfeed side and use the push pads hand-over-hand to "walk" the board across. You should put downward pressure on the infeed table when starting the cut and on the outfeed table when ending the ...


5

The simplest way is to just glue the boards together. Making sure all the pieces are square. You can glue a short piece to a longer piece and then glue the next piece to both of them making it out to the 5' mark. (or maybe a couple to get the full length. If you have a 15" wide planer it makes it easy at the end to run it through to even out the top/...


5

especially since you already 'hold' down the piece and turn it around I use bench clamps like these. You attach them to the top of you bench permanently. I have them on 3 corners (of my bench). they do an excellent job of hold your work piece and you can do most of the board then turn it around and work on the end that was held down.


5

Use double sided tape to affix the piece you are working on to a thicker piece, and use your bench dogs. Similar to how you can use a sled on a planer to plane thin stock. I use SpecTape from either Woodcraft or Amazon. It holds material very securely.


5

Here is a good video showing how to get nails out that have pulled through the slats and are stuck in the inner runners (which is a common problem). He suggests gripping the hammer in a vise and using the superior leverage of the long piece of wood itself to pull the nails. He also suggests hitting the nail head once with the hammer before pulling to break ...


5

I have worked with old fences and have achieved a "new" wood look by planing. The problem is that, after planing, you only have a small amount of wood to work with. You might run into the same problem. But...just pass it through a planer and it will look quite new. Be careful running pallet wood, or any reclaimed wood for that matter, through a planer. If ...


4

If you're looking for a patina/darkness as opposed to an orange-rust color, baking soda will do nicely. If you want to 'lock in' this color, a quick trip to a 450F oven will do the trick nicely.


3

I had a bed rail twist on me once. I tried to wet it and then dry it while it was held flat. It didn't work. What did work was kind of embarrassing. I slipped one end into the hardware on the headboard, rotated the footboard until it would slip into the hardware on the other end, then rotated the footboard back into the normal position. That is, I used ...


3

I think what you are asking is: How do I ensure all my vertical boards are the same length. Often, this is more important than being a particular length. Another way to say it is: You desire precision over accuracy. This is a common goal in cabinetry, and you should be pleased that you figured out that it's important. Here is the trick I use to help ...


2

Sources: boat yards, Re-Store, yard/estate sales, furniture warehouse 'broken corner', curbs the night before trash day, rural antique stores, old condemned houses especially in historic areas, rural woodshops and lumber mills. (Most important rule: keep eyes and ears open for opportunities.) Tools: metal detectors to find nails, grinders (4.5" KwicCut 24 ...


2

Pulling the nails Initially most people who do this will start with a claw hammer. While that can obviously work it has some definite downsides. Other than the aching backs most people will experience some wooden-handled hammers simply can't take the strain of pulling ring-shank and spiral-shank nails, that have often rusted into the wood, again and again ...


2

I'm not sure if you realize, but that's going to be one heavy top, at 1.5" thick x 15" deep x 60" long. As far as the how, you can do it in sub-assemblies. Basically, build up some smaller 4 or 5 board length sub-sections, and laminate them together.


2

Position yourself centered in front of the cutterhead and use both hands to keep pressure over the cutterhead; as one hand passes, replace the other hand to continue pushing. Do not leave hands near either end of the stock being jointed. Personally, I've never used a push stick or push block but perhaps I should start considering the document Doresoom linked....


2

I don't own a jointer myself, but I watched my dad use his for years, and he always used a pair of flat push blocks with handles and rubber pads on the bottom for friction. Using this type of push block will allow you to safely maintain downward pressure on the work piece while it's over the cutter head. You may also want to use a variation of this with a ...


2

Second-hand pallet timber should not be used for anything except pallets or industrial use. The problem is two-fold: you don't know how the pallet was originally treated, nor what the pallet experienced during use. It could have been dragged through toxic chemicals or had contaminated contents placed on it for transport. If safety is really your concern ...


1

If the workpiece width is less than width of plane blade I will mount plane in my bench vise and move workpiece over plane.


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