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16

It is called clinching. The technique is pretty simple, yet hold fairly well to prevent separation from the two boards. Here is a good example of how to do it: Source The example calls for a small bar to be used to bend a short length of the nail. This can also be accomplished by just using a hammer to angle the nail. Any deformation of the wood will be ...


8

Should I pre-drill before nailing or not? Unfortunately the answer to this is, it depends. With certain woods, particularly when nailing near the ends of boards, pre-drilling can be advisable. A different fix when nailing near the end of a board is to leave the board over-long (where possible) and then cut to length after the nails have been driven home. ...


7

Expanding to an actual answer. Typically finish nails are, as indicated by the name, for finishing touches. I.e. trim, face materials, etc. They are not structural, and are often used in conjunction with other stronger methods. As I understand you question there are a couple of options Counter-sink screws periodically to provide additional structural ...


5

It is probable that the joint is stronger where it is glued than in the surrounding wood. The original crack was most likely due to the nail so placing another nail could apply pressure to the adjacent wood risking a similar crack. Drilling the gue out will help, but you will want to keep the hole smaller so that the nail gets a firm grip. The firmer the ...


5

Rockler has a V-Nail Installation Tool that should be right up your alley: I'm sure there are other stores where you can get these, but this is the first one I found.


5

Quality Related to Jamming The best answer to this question would be to run an experiment and report the jam rates for different grades of nail guns, with different grades of nails. However, since most users most likely won't have a number of differing quality nail guns at their disposal, I can tell you the experience I've had with my mid-range quality ...


5

I don't know that I would trust 16 ga nails from a pneumatic nailer, regardless of length, unless there were quite a few of them. The issue is the difference between the body diameter and the head diameter (or lack thereof). If you're going to be hanging tools and/or shop cabinets full of heavy tools from the plywood, I'd recommend finding another fastener ...


5

I wasn't satisfied with the electric nailer I bought, which barely worked on soft pine. A better alternative for me was a gas nailer. Paslode, Hitachi and other gas nailers ignite a small charge of fuel to drive the nail and have vastly greater impact than an electric nailer, plus no hose to struggle with. However, gas nailers use a proprietary rechargeable ...


4

Having used both, I can definitively say this. An air brand nailer/pinner, is quick, powerful and often just the right tool. Sometimes it does suffer from being corded. My electric brad nailer is a bit slow between shots compared to an air variety, but is not hindered in angle or length to the compressor, but it is a fair bit heavier and bulkier (in most ...


4

If there is a danger of the nail splitting the work piece, PRE-DRILL. Otherwise nail away..


4

I agree with TX Turner -- screws would probably be the way to go. I like to opt for the SPAX screws that self-tap (no pre-drilling and unlikely to split wood) and have the torx bit so it is far less likely for the bit to skip and strip the screw. They might cost more but they are totally worth it. Home Depot carries the the SPAX brand, and Lowes carries a ...


4

Clinching or clenching. I've always used the former word. http://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/joinery/video-tip-clenching-a-nail-with-confidence


4

21 Degree nailers are the most common. They fire full head nails held together with a plastic strip. 34 degree nailers can use full or clipped head nails. The strips are held together with paper. Clipped head nails are not allowed for framing in many jurisdictions. 28 degree nailers are pretty much a Bostitch only size. The nails are held together with ...


4

Are there any other easier and cost effective options for mounting a 2x6 to concrete? Tapcon screws will be your easiest and cheapest means to mount a 2x6 to a concrete floor, by far. They will require a hammer drill to drill the holes in the concrete, but you can rent one from the store if you don't have one. You could also use concrete expansion anchors ...


3

I'm not sure if this is cheaper in the long term but consider using adhesive, it's certainly the easiest option since you just apply, press the board into position and wait for the glue to cure. Construction adhesive and epoxy are both viable here, as long as the concrete surface is in good condition, not friable and dust-free. With epoxy in particular you ...


3

You are bound to be disappointed by the limitations of a 23g pinner. (Headless or not.) Pins just don't have the holding power. Plus, you're paying a premium to get one that'll handle long (>1-3/8) pins. And they break faster than an 18g gun. 18g, on the other hand, is a workhorse. Baseboard? Yup. Casing? Yup. Holding things in place while the glue sets? ...


3

Honestly, I would not do this. There are many techniques for blind-nailing trim if you really want it to look nice and want to minimize finishing steps to hide nail heads. Also, as suggested in the comments, there already is a technique for angling nails so you maximize the strength of the fastener interface. When I was in the trades I saw that there were ...


3

If you have a hammer drill, then use tapcon. If you don't, then you're going to have to buy or rent tools anyway, and the decision isn't clear. Cost is largely a wash if you don't already have the appropriate tools for one or the other. Time is different, though. Drilling holes and then screwing in screws is much more time consuming than simply shooting a ...


2

This question has been asked in DIY here, but there are several structural related considerations that are worth mentioning for woodworker's consideration. Most residential codes require nails. That is because the industry standards for nails are well established. The most commonly used framing nail is a 16d and the thickness and material strength of ...


1

Yes it is. Those hip talking advertising people.


1

They have drill bits you can use in a regular drill for concrete. Not expensive at all. Then buy some cut nails and tie wire. The bit should be slightly smaller than the cut nail. Drill the hole through the board into the concrete and then cut yourself a piece of wire. Stick the wire in the hole so you have extra coming out like a couple inches. Then drive ...


1

If you want the wood to be mounted permanently you can use a ramset and wood fastening bolts. Pretty cheap and extremely fast. Its like shooting a gun, bam! bam! bam! You're done. If you value your money much more than your time, I would use ordinary masonry anchors because that will be the cheapest option.


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