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9

This looks like a beading scratch-stock. Beading is a decorative detail added to the edges of boards to make them less prone to damage and to hide gaps in joinery or around doors. This tool creates them by scraping the workpiece with the metal blade. This is not a "cutting" operation because the blade is held perpendicular with the workpiece. In this ...


8

I found it! - Windsor Beader Type 1 - 1885


6

"White wood" is not a specific species, rather it is whatever is available locally and inexpensive. Typically it will be pine, doug fir, spruce, etc. It should work fine. If you're doing complex molding profiles you might consider using poplar. It tends to work better, holds fine details well, and shows less grain through paint.


6

I haven't installed crown molding myself but it sounds like coping the joints is an alternative to cutting bevels on both pieces of molding on a miter saw. Coping can give you a better fit than a miter joint because walls are often textured and aren't always perfectly square to one another, making for a sloppy fit. Family Handyman outlines a process whereby ...


5

There are a great many websites and YouTube videos that have tutorials on how to install crown molding. I've looked at a lot of them and tried to implement the skills in my own house. Here is my very favorite article along with a series of videos [youtube] It's tricky because even the slightest irregularities in your joints are glaringly obvious. As a ...


4

Poplar seems to be the preferred wood for painting. It's got a nice, tight grain that sands nicely, takes paint well and leaves a smooth surface. It has the additional advantage of being cheap. While you may be willing to spend more, there's no point in doing so for a "fancy" wood if you're going to slop apply paint over it. Nobody will ever know ...


4

First, cut a measuring jig from half-inch plywood. Make it U-shaped, 12 by 12 inches with a large notch to match the wall thickness. Use the jig to quickly scan each door opening. If the notch is cut medium, then you can gauge thin wall (jig fits loosely) and medium wall (jig just slides over.) A thicker wall will prevent the jig from sliding over. Then ...


4

I feel like this is one of those answers where more than one answer can be right. It boils down to experience and what you were taught. I understand shoe molding as the molding family that is partnered with a baseboard. In the same way that crown molding describes the family of molding used to finish top edges. When used on baseboard the quarter round is ...


4

They're used almost interchangeably today, but no there is a slight difference. Shoe molding is wider/taller (depending on orientation) in one direction than the other and the curve isn't a perfect arc, rather than being a perfect 1/4 of a circle as in quarter round. via http://thecraftsmanblog.com/quarter-round-vs-shoe-molding/:


3

The most expensive option is commissioning a router bit to make that cut in one pass. However You can do this with multiple passes using a tilted router and a variety of bits. For some straight corners a few passes over a lowered table saw will do. This page has a nice collection of tips.


2

The best material for painted trim is not wood at all. You should be using MDF, or, if you're worried about denting, PVC. These man made materials surpass wood for this application in almost every way other than not having open grain if that look is desired. But since you're mentioning using maple and that you don't want the deep grain of sapele this ...


2

I have installed frames in walls that even vary in width over the length of the jambs. The trick I have used is to make the jambs too wide, dry assemble the jambs with a single nail to loosely hold the head and jambs together, and set them in place. I then score a line on the jambs to match the contour of each wall edge over the perimeter of the opening. ...


2

If anyone is interested, I've experimented a bit and learned a little about the difference between conventional molding and wood boards. First, I found that Home Depot has finger-jointed primed pine lumber like 1x3 1x4, etc that is very much like pre-made molding. With a router, it's easy to round over the corners, and cut a shallow channel on the back to ...


2

Looks like you’ve got a good back saw you just need a quality miter box so that you can cut your angles precisely, Or spring for an electric miter saw. Personally I think a smaller shoe molding will look the best and if you have a miter box cutting your corners would be much easier than trying to use a speed square. Whatever molding you use when it comes ...


1

While the molding pieces do not get shorter pulling the joint apart, shrinkage across the width of the molding can create a gap. I recently removed some 'modern 2 1/4" moldings from a door and discovered that in addition to nailing the trim along the length of the face to the rough framing, the original installer also used finish nails on the sides near the ...


1

Casing, moulding, and trim can hide many sins, but as you have found out it cannot easily hide large problems with the underlying rough carpentry. This is especially so with problems related to nailing edges. Installing trim is a bit of an art, especially since much of it is installed by someone other than the person who built the framing, or hung the door ...


1

There is no angle for making a symmetrical joint of the two pieces Cutting the left trim to meet the corner requires a 55 degree angle where the right piece is approx. 90 degrees. The vertical ends are not the same length. Any profile in the trim will only enhance the mismatched appearance. There are several approaches you can use to make the junction ...


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