19

There's two ways that immediately pop to mind- one involves spending a significant amount of money, the other a significant amount of time. You can buy replacement miter gauges for most table saws (e.g. Incra) that are very very accurate. Couple that with a good tune-up, and you'll be cutting perfect miters in no time. However, the other option is to make a ...


12

The type of mitres you're looking to do are called case mitres because in a different context they'd be used for casework, i.e. cabinetry or box making1. Other than sawing them directly (challenging to do with hand tools) the standard method to produce these is by planing. Even if your freehand sawing was very very good and you could do the cuts freehand (...


10

The miter sled and precision miter gauge suggested by TX Turner work great for picture frames since your table saw's maximum depth of cut does not become a limiting factor. To make mitered boxes--including shadow boxes with mitered corners--there is another technique that works well, which involves tilting your saw blade and using a crosscut sled. If you ...


8

How can I create a tight mitered frame around a fixed size, pre-existing object? OK I'll tackle this one first as it's actually most important: in this context you don't want to. To pass on some sage advice I read only recently: new woodworkers should resist the urge to picture-frame a panel made from solid wood [of any significant size]. Just to add a ...


7

Don't try to measure it. Mark it. And mind the kerf. This is the trick to most woodworking, actually. You don't measure nearly as often as you just hold one piece up to another and mark the location to be cut. You measure for the rough dimensions, of course. But when cutting it to the precise size and shape you need, you mark it. Assuming you already have ...


7

The reason the lock miter bit is restricted to the router table is mostly for safety - it is a large diameter bit, and it exerts a lot of force on whoever is holding the router, be it you or the table. In addition, using it handheld will increase the risk of misalignment of the cut, which is crucial for the lock miter to work. I would suggest building a ...


6

I cut miters under the assumption that getting to 45 degrees perfectly is difficult. My solution is to use a miter sled to make the cuts. The sled is uses a 90 degree angle set as close to 45 degrees to the saw blade as possible. If the angle is off a little it does not matter. Cut your boards placed on one side for one half of the miter and the opposite ...


5

You can freehand the cut with a hand saw. Start at one corner, carefully lining up the saw with your 45° angle mark, then slowly work into the cut. You'll want to cut primarily along the edge of the board to establish the angle, but also into the face so you're moving along the face while you establish the angle. To help get the angle correct, you can use ...


4

I see three inherent weaknesses, two of which critically compromise the strength of the bed. I'd suggest looking at commercially-produced solid wood bed frames for some design ideas (don't look at cheap futons, etc.). The support beam running down the middle is inherently weak at the ends because the top half transfers the load to the outer frame, but the ...


4

New liners I think the correct approach to this problem is to make new liners. Possibly only two of the four pieces need to be re-done to get everything tight enough*. Now hiding mistakes is a standard part of woodworking :-) but so is remaking components that haven't come out quite right. And as these are such simple pieces this shouldn't feel like too ...


3

The indicated joint could be created using mortise and tenon, dowel pins, or biscuits. I suspect the level of strength is in that order as well. It's less likely that this joint is connected using pocket screws, but you could also accomplish a strong connection in that manner, and fill the screw holes. Gluing is implied in all cases.


3

Make or buy a zero tolerance insert for your tablesaw. This will give cleaner cuts, and not give a place for the off cuts to drop into.


3

Currently stuck on how to attach the wood pieces to achieve the X look without having super visible joints and without compromising the stability/support it needs. The metal legs appear to be approximately 1" square. That is a very slender profile for wood connections. Unless you intend to apply a great deal or weight the 6" high vertical legs should ...


3

Select the wood more carefully Switch to using quarter-sawn boards. Without changing the species of wood currently used selecting quarter-sawn only for these pieces would go a long way towards minimising the problem because of the reduced shrinkage (typically around half that in plain-sawn wood). I think this is unlikely to be seen as a cost-effective ...


3

I have seen many guys using a table saw jig for this. Wouldn't the above be good enough? It depends on your standards, not the quality of the mitre gauge. As the section on mitre joints in a few books shows, some people would never accept a mitre cut for a picture frame straight from the saw (any saw) but would always refine it. In the home workshop this ...


3

Rob's concerns are important. When you calculate the load that the main beams will carry you must ignore the depth of the notches and calculate the sag/load based only on the depth of the continuous wood below the notches. I would also caution you regarding the use of the 3-way miter. This is not a joint for beginners. It will need to be tight, so unless ...


2

Unless you are using a high grade plywood, a miter lock bit is likely to produce a lot of tear-out. I've never seen one used in anything other than solid wood. And unless it's an exposed joint that you want to show off, it's more than you need for a solid join. Consider using a dado and rabbet (a.k.a lock rabbet) joint instead. It's easy to make with a ...


2

Stanley/Bailey #4 w/ corrugated sole, #5 1/4, #6, Wood river low angle block plane, Stanley sweetheart dual rabbet plane, Simmons #6--longer than Stanley/Bailey #5 but smaller than #6). Which of these planes would be best for a shooting board? Any of them other than the rebate plate. Which size of plane to use for shooting is partly a matter of preference. ...


2

A side flat enough that it doesn't rock is all that is needed. The squareness of the edge produced is determined by the (adjustable) angle the blade edge forms with the side. The angle of the sole, as long as it's reasonably close (a couple degrees maybe) is not a principal factor. So you can lay the plane on its side on a flat surface, and then just ...


2

With mitre cuts you're nearly always going to bisect the angles*, so with 122° corners you will be aiming to mitre at 61°. But you're going to have to do some test cuts anyway to ensure the saw is giving you exactly what you need once set to 61° — that setting on the saw is not a guarantee you'll get an angle that exactly matches the one measured by ...


2

It sounds like your main problem is that you're cutting on the wrong side of a tilted blade. However, for cutting picture frame miters you should not have the blade tilted at all. In general you should always have the work piece flat on the table if possible. This is a lot more stable (and therefore more accurate) than putting the piece up on edge. To ...


2

To expand slightly on FreeMan's answer: You can free chisel it - a wide chisel and a mallet with also work. Extras - Generally, sawing and a plane is the quickest for a large board, and chisel with or without the plane for smaller work. You mentioned a preference for Japanese saws. When cutting with a saw with a clean (non-rusted) blade, you can see a ...


2

Your approach is decidedly non-standard, and worryingly so. I'd recommend you stick with the standard approach - bed bolts, head/foot boards and side rails. The approach you're showing is necessarily restricted to very short support elements on your hardware, and given the stresses beds are subjected to that's not a good idea.


2

Looks like you’ve got a good back saw you just need a quality miter box so that you can cut your angles precisely, Or spring for an electric miter saw. Personally I think a smaller shoe molding will look the best and if you have a miter box cutting your corners would be much easier than trying to use a speed square. Whatever molding you use when it comes ...


2

My Kobalt saw is the same configuration as yours and I suspect the depth stop is identical in form and function. The purpose of the bolt and nut is to allow you to set the desired depth with the bolt, then tighten the nut against the body of the saw. This is effectively called a jam-nut and is often used for securing two nuts on a bolt, tightening each ...


2

From my view, the easiest way to make this angle miter stronger is with pocket hole screws and glue. The pocket hole setup only requires the drilling to be done on one piece. After the holes are set, clamp the two pieces together and insert the screws. All the normal low price jigs for the other joints are designed for 90^ or straight on joints. You could ...


1

I'll admit I'm having a hard time visualizing exactly what you want to do, but it sounds like you have plenty of room for at least two types of joinery. The problem here is that mitre joints aren't very strong compared with other types of joints. So some sort of reinforcement is usually recommended. I can think of two techniques you probably have room for: ...


1

Casing, moulding, and trim can hide many sins, but as you have found out it cannot easily hide large problems with the underlying rough carpentry. This is especially so with problems related to nailing edges. Installing trim is a bit of an art, especially since much of it is installed by someone other than the person who built the framing, or hung the door ...


1

Can you use hook on headboard brackets for the long boards? In fact, you could use them for connecting all of the top pieces together. Now to handle the legs. Maybe you could resaw the outer boards in half. On the inner piece, on the outer side, counterbore a recess for a hex head, and drill a hole through the board. Epoxy a hex bolt in place, with the ...


1

First, if the space is air conditioned, I would not worry about the expansion. The temperature/humidity change will be minimal. The 1x3 you glued on the back side will help strengthen the miter joint. If you will have heavy loads (on a shallow shelf?) you could add another layer of 1x3 glued to the back to resist the rotation force between the shelf and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible