29

I use a Stanley Panel Carry (Model 93-300). It is about $7.00 on Amazon or at Home Depot. For cutting panels, the best way is to get a sheet of foam insulation, and lay it on the ground and put the panel on top of it. Cut through the panel into the foam.


27

There are commercial handles that are supposed to make carrying plywood easier, but they're not inexpensive. The simplest way I've carried sheet goods is with a loop of rope caught on the corners. e.g. source


20

PVC is commonly used in dust collection systems. Typically for longer runs you should use 6" or larger pipe, regardless of the material. If you're using PVC, the larger, less expensive pipe is commonly available as sewer drain pipe. As of May 2015, there have been no known fires caused by a static discharge in a PVC pipe from a dust collection system. ...


13

There are panel carriers which range from inexpensive at less than $10 to rather pricey at around $50. You can also use the rope loop method as suggested by TX Turner. Personally, I try to avoid lifting 4'x8' sheets thicker than 1/2" by myself. Instead I slide or drag them onto the cart at the store, then slide or drag them onto the car's luggage rack (or ...


13

The sagulator will give deflection values for horizontal shelf spans using various materials and thicknesses. Unless you are working with extremely heavy loads (more than the weight of a countertop with people dancing on it), 3/4" material for the (vertical) cabinet walls should be more than adequate. As you make the walls thinner, they will still remain ...


11

Assuming of course that you have no problem with the weight, I just stand the board on the long edge, go to the middle of the board tip it maybe on my foot or some other thing to get my hand under it then with the other hand balance it, pick it up, and carry it. A lot like this If you have strange passages you need to maneuver around you might have to get ...


9

I'm going to run with the assumption that you're referring to paperboard or a thin hardboard. Think of the paperboard as being like a sausage: it has a skin on it that keeps the good bits in, but if you bend it too far, that skin will tear. Scoring hardboard Your best option (steam would probably damage the board, as Matt mentioned) would be to score the ...


7

What would be a suitable material, in terms of durability and cost, for a children's desk? For a piece of furniture that's destined for the lifetime of abuses that children can inflict upon it, I view it from two different schools of thought. The first school says that since you expect the piece to be beaten up, painted, and generally neglected, you will ...


4

For moving plywood on the ground, I stand the sheet up on the short end; put my back against it; grip the edges (backhand), somewhere below the centerline; and lean forward. Very easy. For carrying up a ladder, I set it long side down, put a C-clamp (tightly!) on the upper edge near the center, and lift it behind me while I climb. (This can get awkward at ...


3

Have been looking for the metal slides to cover the peg board slot on the board I made out of cherry. Cribbage boards come in a huge variety of styles (consider this large-mouth bass board), and I don't recall seeing two that had the exact same peg storage covers, so I think you'll have a hard time sourcing those covers as a separate part. Since you ...


3

Strength should not be your concern. A butcher-block slab with a large unsupported span is likely to to fail - the vertically-oriented wood fibers will separate (which happens normally with moisture changes and is called checking) under any load. Your slab must be supported by an underlying structure which will prevent any flexing loads from being applied. ...


3

While it's probably more than you're willing to spend, Gorilla Grip plywood handlers have a pretty good ad. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6XyAnkqOTg EDIT - My apologies to rob. I had not followed his "rather pricey" link, which is the same as mine.


3

Usually I just Wrestle it, but in offices and other finished areas I use a door cart. Here is how to make a door cart: start with a four wheel furniture dolly. cut a two by four about the length of the long side or slightly longer. wrap it in carpet and attach to the furniture dolly. It should be on top and all the way to one side. cut three more two by ...


2

I have always used a door carry, which is not a device but a grip. This grip is one that is good to know when help or other devices are not available to you. The grip is one were the arm that is going to used to carry the wood is bent like it is in a cast. You cradle the piece of plywood on your forearm, with the top leaning into your shoulder. You have ...


2

This seems like it might be a pretty credible solution… $34-40.00 on Amazon - unless of course your dealing with stairs which is pretty probable. Honestly though, at some point it is also pretty likely (and unfortunate) that at some point you will be wrestling with beast, e.g. getting it out of the truck, on to the cart, etc… So your best bet might just ...


2

I don't know about PVC tubing with regards to static build-up, but an important thing to consider that you may not have thought about is that having a small bend radius when you're going around corners etc. can actually choke up your system and cause you to lose a lot of suction power, as it gives more resistance. If you use standard PVC tubing and standard ...


2

Just to toss out a contrarian point of view: melamine or other plastic-laminate-over-cheap-core-material isn't elegant, but it's waterproof, stain-resistant, and fairly cheap. There are good reasons many office desktops use this sort of material. It would be far from heirloom quality, and unless you spend more or apply laminate yourself you have somewhat ...


2

To me it depends more on how long do you want these to last? If this is just a child's play toy that you expect will be tossed out in a couple years, then Cheaper is better, say some pine or even high quality plywood. However, if you think this might make it to a family 'heirloom' go for the good stuff. Oak can take a pretty good beating and still look ...


2

You'll probably want to do both. You certainly want to separate out your plywood from your solid wood. With your plywood, you can lay things out down to very fine resolution so you can get exactly what you need out of the sheet. Jay Bates has a nice video detailing his process for this in SketchUp. For your solid wood, you'll want to come up with a total ...


1

Is there such a thing as a woodworking chisel with a high-speed steel tip? I think so, but you won't easily find any. If I'm remembering correctly these were offered in the past by a few makers in the early or mid-20th century. A few years ago a British company offered bench chisels with replaceable HSS tips, rather than having an HSS piece welded to a ...


1

Most turning tools use high speed steel. This is so that they can be sharpened with a normal grinder instead of bench stones or a wet grinder. They typically do not hold an edge as long as a good quality tool steel would. The idea being that the ease of sharpening makes more frequent resharpening easy. Also, it does seem that some Japanese chisels use ...


1

There is something for leveling wood floors called "self leveling compound". I don't have direct experience with it, but I used to sell it. If I remember correctly you have to put it on in relatively thin coats (1/8"). An example of such a product is Henry 345 - Premixed Patch and Level. If you go to the flooring section of a big box store, there may be ...


1

If you have plenty of time you can use plain old polyurethane. Pour some of the fluid into the bottom - say one or two mm and let it dry. Repeat until the desired thickness is reached. There is also a product referred to as casting resin which is a a two part product that needs to be mixed, but it sets quite quickly (minutes), however it releases a high ...


1

Our operator was injured from a static discharge of a PVC pipe entering his hand and exiting his elbow, so it is not a myth. This was in a dust collection application.


1

If you work in a professional wood shop (Oregon) use of PVC piping for combustible/wood dust collection is a no no and can get you a fine (Due to the static build up regardless of the use of a ground.) It's more well known that using PVC for compressed air lines is a no no and a osha violation but same thing for ventilation / dust collection.


1

Aside from wetting it, you will have better success (probably) by treating it like wood-bending - provide a tension support on the outside when bending, rather than bending it around a form on the inside. When bending around a form, the outside needs to stretch, so it tears. When bending inside a form the inside compresses - it may wrinkle a bit, but it won'...


1

Another approach would be to place a flexible but firm backer on both sides of the paperboard. A thin plastic sheet from a folder or package would work. Clamp them together, and then bend the 'sandwiched' materials, which would keep the paperboard from folding. join the edges when they meet, and then the paperboard will hold its shape.


1

For paperboard running the material over a hard edge with a little tension will put some curvature in the board. The more you pull the board over an edge like the side of a bench or table saw, the tighter the radius of the curve will be. Depending on the size, you can keep going until the two edges meet up, forming your cylinder.


1

If you have a tarp (or you could get one, they come in handy a lot) you can simply lay the tarp down, set the plywood on its face on the tarp (you could probably even do more than one at a time this way). Obviously, the tarp should be bigger than 4x8 for this to work right. Then get a rope, stick it through two of the back circular openings, then go in front ...


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