11

To make the first 'cut' I would split it in half. I personally would use my wood maul and just split it. I've had years of splitting wood for firewood and could do a pretty even split down the middle. So, what I would recommend would be to use a large mallet or a round ended maul and pound it into the wood to split it. To make things a little easier you ...


11

I suspect the issue here is with the bowsaw blade not having enough 'set' to the teeth. The 'set' of the teeth on a saw blade is how far to either side the teeth are bent out from the main body of the blade, which makes the width of the cut wider and gives the body of the blade some clearance in the saw groove (kerf). Some bowsaw blades have no set (...


11

Building a bandsaw sled and using a bandsaw with 10" or larger resaw capacity is the first power tool solution that comes to mind. Matthias Wandel has a nice article detailing how to do this. Since you mentioned you only have access to a circular saw and table saw, the cheapest solution, aside from finding someone with more tools, would be to rip the block ...


10

In general, panel glue-up requires accurate square faces on the boards being glued. However, not all is lost. One possibility is that your combination square is not perfectly square. To try and verify this, cut several thin strips of wood using your saw. When pressed together (in the same orientation as they were cut, see below for why) any deviation from ...


9

I used a belt sander to remove most of the finish of some old tiger oak flooring before running it through the planer. 80 grit sand paper is cheaper than blades. But I did keep a set of old blades to use for the first pass on all of them. A metal detector is a great investment if you'll be doing a lot of reclaiming.


8

First, make sure you're permitted to take the wood! Some places intend to sell their dropwood to local mills. Always check first about a downed tree. You want a portable sawmill or an apparatus to saw into boards with a chainsaw: Once you have sawn the log into slabs, you would use stickering to dry the wet slabs over a period of months. This process ...


8

I'm of the same mind as Matt- you'd need a large capacity band saw, a chain saw then a big band saw, a chainsaw mill, a portable mill, or.. any number of large, expensive tools. Were it me, I'd ask the folks at my local wood working stores (Rockler, Woodcraft, etc) If there's a mill they know that will take a random chunk of wood. If they don't know, ask ...


8

I was trying to find the answer to something else and realized there was a section in this book called, Modern Woodworking Techniques. It is a conglomeration of articles from the magazine Fine Woodworking. On page 124, they talk about drying your wood. It says that the "old-timers" rule of thumb is a year of air drying per inch of thickness, but ultimately ...


7

I've read about branches having internal stresses and twisting/warping. The main reason not to use wood from branches normally is that it's full of reaction wood, wood that has internal stress from its original orientation of the branch where it was under stress, supporting the weight of the branch and its foliage. When the branch is sawn into planks the ...


7

First thing, most branches are very poor for turning into lumber. They will be stress wood and very likely to bend and twist as they dry or after, sometimes even while you are cutting them. They of course can be used for turning. As Peter Grace said, always ask before you collect it, but if it's just laying around, most of the time you will be allowed, ...


7

I would propose that kiln-dried wood (in particular steam kilning) is sometimes inferior to naturally cured wood. Advantages of Kiln Drying Kiln dried lumber is more readily available Much faster than alternative drying methods Disadvantages to Kiln-Drying Loss of Character American Black Walnut is a great example of a wood that suffers when kiln dried. ...


6

Whether a peice of wood is worth it depends on how you are going to use it. If you want it for inlays then you don't need much viable wood. You just need enough to cut of the piece you want with a scroll- or band-saw. If you want to build a cabinet out of it then you will need a lot more. You can scrape of the finish with a chisel. Sharpen it and hold it ...


5

Keep the gap open with wedges. Next to that, sharp teeth are the most important thing. I learned that lesson with a chainsaw -- even though the engine was doing the work, a dull chain got me nowhere, and after sharpening, it cut like a hot knife through butter.


5

There are a couple options. The first and cheapest (though by far the most work) is to get a chainsaw mill. some of these are a guide you can buy for your existing chain saw and others come with a special bar and chain and others come with the saw. You will need a fairly powerful saw and I would recommend spending the money on a rip saw chain. A rip ...


5

In basic outline there's no real problem with what you want to do, after all these days many panels are made in somewhat this way, except that the wood is from branches. Branch wood, unlike the majority of trunk wood, is nearly all what's called reaction wood so it has lots of internal stress. In branches the wood that originally was on top is in tension ...


4

TL;DR: It is an enormous amount of effort but it can be done. The resulting wood can be prone to cracking. I've tried to do a bit of this and like most of us here on Stack Exchange, I read a lot of information about it online and offline (dead tree versions: IRONY). Here is a summary of my experience: Lesson 1: Buy coating to paint the end grain from ...


4

You can really rive almost any wood. That statement is flawed as there are wood species, particularly those with long straight grain, that rive easier than others. It is important to know that species alone is not the key. You want your wood to be straight and relatively free of defects like knots and branches. The size of the froe can also help determine ...


4

Are you familiar with how the wood fibers are aligned in a tree? They (mostly) run from top to bottom and are bonded together with lignin. If you used the 'B' method the wood fibers would be running into and out of the page when viewing your diagram. This would make the bond between neighbouring fibers short and weak - the cover would snap easily. This is ...


4

If you've got a lot to spare, then overdo it. Curves, twists, warps etc will always kill your yield. Flatsawn is apt to be less stable (esp with respect to cupping) than quartersawn. The milling marks you'll get from the sawmill will have an impact, too. Really rough, and you'll want a bit more thickness in the rough size. Regarding the final use... short ...


3

How was the log supported? You might consider putting a sawbuck or a piece of log directly under the kerf, making an orientation similar to a see-saw, so that gravity pulls the two halves of the log such that the kerf is self-opening. This is commonly used when chainsawing logs in the woods so that the saw doesn't get pinched, and it should be applicable ...


3

My question is: After I do this but before I plane the boards, should I leave them sit out in the open air (maybe a week or two) to reabsorb moisture from the air? I think it's certainly advisable, and other than the wait there's no downside to doing this so you lose nothing but a bit of time if you take this extra step. And kudos for realising already it ...


3

Interesting idea; it never occurred to me. I have a few narrow branches that I thought weren't going to be usable for much more than veneer, but using your approach if I can get a few 1"x1" cross-section sticks out of them I might be able to reassemble them into something more useful. Yes, you want to let the wood dry --and mostly settle into its final ...


3

I may be off a little on this, but from my experience of looking up antique tools, a froe was primarily use to spit roof shakes (shingles). Back in the day when to homes were made with the local trees, whether cut by pit saw, adz or other means, shakes where cut with a froe after the logs where cut to a specific length, somewhere in the 20"-24" range. The ...


2

Kilns will work fast to dry the wood, in large planks that means that the end-grain will dry out first than the middle. This may lead to cracks. If you have climate controlled kiln then you can slow the drying down so the center of the wood can equalize before the stress becomes too big.


2

A froe splits wood along the grain, so it works best on wood with long straight grain. Anything with a complex figure is likely to fight being split this way. I haven't worked with the woods you mention, so I can't offer any more specific advice.


2

Part of it depends on what you are planning to do with it. using it to make fine furniture, the limit is much earlier than if you are going to use it for more artistic pursuits such as turning bowls or making panels from the spalted wood for beautiful accents. For me, how I go about it is I have my chain saw handy (I'm often making firewood when doing this ...


2

Sources: boat yards, Re-Store, yard/estate sales, furniture warehouse 'broken corner', curbs the night before trash day, rural antique stores, old condemned houses especially in historic areas, rural woodshops and lumber mills. (Most important rule: keep eyes and ears open for opportunities.) Tools: metal detectors to find nails, grinders (4.5" KwicCut 24 ...


2

I believe there is just no easy "rule of thumb" when deciding what thicknesses to cut green lumber in an attempt to obtain a certain machined dry lumber thickness, without a lot of waste. Many factors can be considered for the best results. If a log is in a lot of tension, it will be moving while you're trying to cut it. When your desire is a specific ...


1

This may be obvious but the larger the log the more usable lumber returned. Since the lumber should be sawn to avoid capturing the pith that will limit log size somewhat. Time is the main factor. Loading a log that yields 4 1x6 boards takes more time to fell, haul, load and saw than the boards are worth. If time is casual then cutting posts from the small ...


1

To get a flat panel, you usually need to start by jointing the glued edges to be extremely straight and perpendicular to the reference face of each board, and then plan on planing, scraping, and-or sanding the glued-up panel to remove any alignment error that happened during glue-up. Remember that as it gains and losses moisture (and swells/shrinks acroos ...


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