8

The faceplate you use screws to secure the piece you are going to turn. some people will glue a waste piece to what they are turning so they don't have to put screw holes in their work piece. A chuck needs something to grip. So you either need to drill/turn one of two things. A tenon for the chuck to clamp down on, or a recess to put the chuck in and ...


6

For turning something like a bowl, a chuck (with a screw center) is a bit more efficient. You can mount the bowl blank with the bottom of the (to be) bowl facing out on a screw held in the chuck, and turn a recess on what will eventually be the foot of the bowl. Once that's done and the outside of the bowl is shaped, you can turn the blank around, remove ...


4

A Morse taper (MT) drill chuck arbor like this has two tapers; one is the Morse taper, and the other is the chuck taper, generally a Jacobs taper (JT). It looks like you have two problems. The Jacobs taper doesn't appear to be seating correctly, which likely means it's the wrong JT size for that chuck. Perhaps the chuck is a JT33 and the arbor is JT3. These ...


4

I'll add that the waste block, or glue block, can have a rabbet/tenon turned in it to be gripped by a chuck. Once the bowl is turned, you can start turning down the glue block as you desire, and can go smaller than the chuck diameter depending on thickness of the block. The bowl bottom can be prepped flat and smooth with the wood blank turned with the bottom ...


4

There are 4 ways I am currently aware of to turn the bottom of a bowl. Turn it first, in this case you need to leave a Rabbet or a tenon for chucks to clamp on/in so that you can turn the bowl around and hollow out the inside. This leaves the tenon or rabbet, and there could be tool marks left from the chuck.(alternately you can glue a piece of 'waste' ...


3

I have s similar item which I have used as a one-screw faceplate. Not a lot to say about it, just put a screw through the hole and into a small piece of wood to turn a small bowl.


3

A faceplate will have much more 'bite' and holding stregth but requires screws either into the piece or parting the final piece from a slug of material attached to the faceplate. This is usually scrap. Without knowing about your specific chuck I can generically say these things: A chuck can hold onto a piece (or a tool in your tail stock for hollowing/...


1

Yes it is oversize, the black band should be just proud of the chuck. If the chuck is too far from the shoulder you will have trouble removing adapter with wedges. Send it back, try again


1

It is hard to tell from the picture if the jaws have any angle to them to support being attached to a dovetail spigot or not (see Getting a Grip on Four-Jaw Lathe Chucks); and event the description on Grizzly Industrial's web site (it does look like the Grizzly chuck) does not do a good job of describing the jaws. Even though Grizzly describes the chuck as ...


1

Each jaw has 4 teeth - 3 stepped ones on the inside and one large one on the outside. Still, it's more of a metalworking chuck that can be used for limited woodworking tasks than a dedicated woodworking chuck. Giving it the sort of teeth you appear to mean would not make it a much better woodworking chuck. You either expand the outer jaws into a relatively ...


1

Not a true answer to your question, however you say that your lathe spindle is plain (I take to mean unthreaded). Any spindle adaptor would therefore need a grub screw or similar to secure it. It would not be a difficult task for someone with a metal lathe to produce an adaptor. My thought would be to use something like a drill arbour. You can certainly buy ...


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