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7

That board is actually two separate boards that have been glued together. When one of them was ripped (i.e. cut lengthwise) it went through the knot. You can see that along the entire length of that slat none of the grain flows through that seam.


4

A butt joint is is not very strong and is likely to break if any wood movement occurs. There are many other ways to handle joints like this that will improve their integrity and diminish their appearance. The simple butt joint such as in your photo could be improved first by making sure that the pieces meet square throughout the cross section or better ...


3

Should I look for another way to fill the void? This is a matter of opinion but I don't think so. Epoxy is one of the best, if not the best, materials to fill voids and fallen knots. It has become virtually the default choice for this purpose for this reason. It should be mentioned that a void at the edge of a board does represent a significant weak spot, ...


3

It's a knot. Or at least you are treating it like a knot. Knots don't match final finish color in virtually all cases. The basic approach - fill with black epoxy. Trying to be subtle but it won't match - fill with a dark gray epoxy. Tossing subtle out the door, fill with epoxy and turquoise (or whatever) chips, polish it up & make it (more of) a feature....


2

You needed to seal the knots prior to painting. No matter what you do, it will continue to bleed through. Remove the paint around the knots. Use solvent such as turpentine to remove the sap with a scraper and rags. Seal the knots with an appropriate knot sealer (available at any paint store). Prime the sealed knots, perhaps twice. Repaint the whole surface ...


2

Thank you all for your advice. It was very helpful to think about it, especially because I’m planning to do one more. To answer some questions, I have added two pieces of wood that go under the joint and at the end of the counter top, so it became a sturdy one-piece counter top. The board is 5/8” thick. In addition to this, I have a screw under (15 degrees ...


2

I don't think doing a sawdust + epoxy/shellac/glue filler will sit well with an oil finish Actually they're fine. Fills don't have to absorb the oil in the same way as the surrounding wood, especially very small fills. I hate to recommend it but this is a good candidate for commercial wood filler. If you have one on hand that's a colour you could live I ...


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