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17

Good, fast, or cheap. Choose any two. Factory methods like pocket holes, screws, and even finger-joints are good enough for mass market construction without having to hire journeymen carpenters. This is how furniture can be made as cheaply as it is. This is just a fact of modern globalism. This is the only way to offer furniture to a global market at scale ...


4

In addition to the economic factors @jdv mentioned, there's been a change in social norms over the last few decades: People now move very frequently compared to the past, and those moves are often far away. Some of my furniture is clearly designed to be cleanly disassembled and can then be packed compactly for moving. Woodwork that is assembled using ...


3

would like some tips on how this can be done. As I mention above in the Comments, this is a typical joint in Chinese furniture (and I think in other Asian furniture traditions as well, although I don't know how they do the joinery). However, as I indicated if this is a Western piece it could be done in any number of ways and the added photo of the underside ...


3

I think that there is a huge 'it depends' in the question. The dependence is based upon 4 things: The nature of forces on the joint (lateral vs. compression vs. expansion) Time Expectation - The willingness of both you and the 'customer' (whoever it is) to pay for your time. (even if its a spouse, your time in the garage and not with them is worth ...


2

The answer is actually sort of in the wording of the Question, these are a type of overlap joint, sometimes called an overlay joint. Because the pieces of wood don't interlock in any manner it makes construction very fast, but it's little used outside of rough carpentry. In a 'proper woodworking' context you might only see this used for the construction of ...


2

Use a 3/8" or a M10 or so threaded insert. Epoxy it into the ends (don't rely on the threads of the insert). For the top piece, bore a hole down the center for some threaded rod, and then epoxy a nut in the end. This will allow you to tighten it against the ceiling. While it is true that inserts set into end grain aren't as strong as they are into ...


2

Let's capture some of the comments in an Answer. For this application almost any joint will do. Though, riding toys are subject to forces that might warrant putting on our engineering caps. The idea here is that the rails of the wagon are like rails on a deck. When force is applied at the top of the railing this translates to a lot of force at the joint, ...


2

An edit with a sketch image was added after i wrote the answer below. As designed in the sketch i would add legs under the half lap joints in the middle. One leg under each joint. Using 2x6 boards laid flat is not a sound plan. They will be much to flexy and will sag significantly. Typically a slat bed has a box frame with a cleat on the inside that the ...


1

Your comment really clarifies your needs. Please add the RR benchwork description to your original question. It is a big help. Now that I can picture your project, I would suggest some small light colored screws instead of wooden dowels. Now I see the need for the Acrylic between your track levels but wooden dowels will be very visible in the clear plastic. ...


1

The ones you may have been looking at with the threaded rod and insert must have small threaded rods for connecting the pieces together. A threaded rod and inserts can be quite strong. Use at 1/4" or greater diameter rod and it should be strong enough. There is nothing wrong with having the end grain for the inserts for this projects. See my markup ...


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