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2

If this were mine, I would first clean the joint the best that I could. Chisel & mallet (gently!) or a paring chisel would do it. Go slow - doing more damage here isn't the idea. You want to make sure two things are accomplished: You want that joint to close and stay closed (with clamps is fine). Make sure that anything that's in the way comes out. You ...


2

You maybe can use screws only to attach beams to plywood. 2 or 3 each, long and thick. But easier building and more security with exterior metal fixings such as these: Truss shoe or joist shoe Your design is complex, and uses much material. If you only seek means for pullups you can mount plates for use of pole or wood beam high in doorframe or hallway very ...


0

How can I avoid this? Use a router to cut stopped dados instead. If you're limited to using a table saw, and that saw doesn't happen to have a router table built into it, it's pretty much unavoidable. Is there a trick? Only if you consider using a tool other than a table saw tricky. A different kind of corner joint? Sure, that'll work. I thought you ...


4

In general just getting some PVA glue in there and clamping the mitre closed (IF you can even do this with sufficient force) won't do enough, for a couple of reasons. Regardless of the adhesive you want to use for the job when repairing a joint you really want to remove any previous glue residue so that as much as possible the new glue is bonding wood to ...


1

I'm looking into learning how to fasten butt joints of mdf as well. I watched a useful video by woodworking YouTuber Steve Ramsey on using pocket screws for this purpose. It points out that the screw should not point toward the end of the receiving piece. So this: ________________ |_ /_______________ |/ | /| | is better than this: ...


3

For a two-piece leg I was all set to recommend alternatives to typical/usual Dominos1 for reinforcing the joint so as to make them a more viable option, until I realised that the area immediately adjacent to the joint needs to accept the horizontal tenon/dowels/screws that would join the chair rails to those legs. Any such fixing either A) directly ...


3

What I am wondering about though is, if I have to cut out the rear leg/back post for the angle or if I could use a (domino) tenon. Those back joints take a lot of stress! Not only do they carry a lot of the weight of the person sitting in the chair, they also have to resist racking in two directions and the force of someone leaning on the chair's back. It's ...


1

Glue is stronger than lignin in wood, but weaker than wood fibers. If you glue along the grain, the wood will fail before the glue due to the weakness of the lignin in wood, but gluing end grain, the glue will fail before the wood since the wood fibers are massively stronger than glue. To increase strength even more, taper the glued ends so that there's ...


0

This is an old question, but it still deserves an answer. Would this type of connector be structurally as sound as a knockdown joint? For the intended use, definitely. For connecting the frame of your Murphy bed, no. What must I consider when using such a connector? You need to think about the size and direction of the load. Bed rail connectors have a ...


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