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If you don't have access to a proper framing underpinner (friend's or neighbour's), then you could either ask a local picture framer to join them for you or if you do want to do it yourself, a pocket-hole jig might be suitable as this will join the corners from the inside where it won't show. Always back up the join with a good wood glue too. If you do go ...


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You haven't significantly compromised strength by removing the last pin and the back of a drawer actually doesn't need to be that strong1 so I don't think it's a big concern. But obviously it is best not to lose a part of a joint (even if only so the effort to make it isn't wasted!) so I'll list some options for you. Sticking with the Blums For future ...


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I'd like to keep using this style of slides on the rest of my drawers. Are those slides just incompatible with dovetails, or is there some trick so that I don't end up with a missing pins? I can think of a few solutions, but if you want to keep using dovetails for that rear joint, the simplest solution is surely to just change the spacing of the pins and ...


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I faced a similar conundrum recently - I wanted a clear epoxy finish to preserve the natural appearance of the wood. In the process of making my piece I made various mistakes with the epoxy, including using a non UV resistant one, and allowing some bubbles to set in the piece (which is very difficult to avoid entirely). You can check out my project (which I ...


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One way I have done these if the flats are 3" or less is with the table saw. The challenge is always the crease. Forget for a moment about the beveled part and think about how you'd do this if there were just a 90° step. That's really nothing but a wide rabbet. One way to cut that is to use the table saw to make one cut from the edge and a second one ...


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Now I want to make fine cuts so that the legs fit into the apron, how can I ensure my cuts are straight? Using a hand saw for fine work is a skill that takes some time to develop. But furniture makers did all kinds of crazy stuff by hand before power tools (or even power!) were available, so it can be done. I can't claim to be that good myself, but here's ...


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I think that offsetting the biscuit in the first case just leaves a little extra meat between the biscuit and the end of the board. Imagine slicing 5/16” off the end of a board. The resulting piece would be incredibly weak because the grain runs through its thickness instead of along its length, right? You could snap it in two with hardly any effort. It’s ...


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It was an oversight that the author neglected to explain fully in Illustrated Cabinetmaking. The racking issue aside, it's important to know different types of wood expand and contract at different rates along the grain and thickness (less so at the endgrain). The biscuit will swell up with the glue but as it dries and contracts it will pull the surrounding ...


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