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11

As discussed in some of the answers to What is the difference between a sabre saw and a jig saw, the terminology has been used differently over time. What we call a scroll saw today (a stationary/benchtop tool with the blade fixed at both ends) was commonly called a jigsaw many years ago. (Source: craigslist) Today's handheld jigsaw (with the blade fixed ...


8

It depends on your pattern Most of the suggestions on the web refer to using the jigsaw for cutting patterns. It is the ideal choice for this work as some patterns are intricate with arcs and what not. What you could do with the jigsaw is use your template as a guide. If your arcs or curves are simple enough you can shift the template down from where the ...


6

What is the proper saw is really a wide open question and depends a lot upon the level of quality in the cut piece desired, your future woodworking plans and your budget. In order of accuracy for straight cuts I would rank hand held tools lower than woodworking shop equipment. In order for poorest to best I would place hand held power tools in this order:...


6

Matthias Wandel on Woodgears wrote a program just for that. I haven't used it myself, but from his own use of this it looks like exactly what you are looking for. He is selling it for 22$, but there is also a free evaluation version: https://woodgears.ca/bigprint/


5

So a shopping trip is in order. I'm a bit short on space, and don't want to spend a fortune on something that will be used rarely at best. You need to give serious consideration to a panel saw since it ticks all of your boxes, in spades. Short on space? I don't think compact even covers it since a hand saw can be hung from a hook on the wall, taking up ...


5

Most of these were in the comments on the original question, but I'll organize them: Track Saw - This is what I would consider the "best" way to go. Unfortunately, they start at a few hundred dollars US. Since you said that you didn't want to spend a lot I would consider this out. Circular Saw - You can cut a perfectly straight line by using a ...


4

I was thinking perhaps I would make a template, use that template to route a shallow guide line, then quickly saw through all of the rest of it using the jig saw That sounds like more work than using a template to draw a pencil line and then following with the jigsaw alone. If the jigsaw-only method gives you satisfactory results, that's probably the ...


4

Really, jigsaws are not the best tool for this job. They are far better at cutting through thinner board materials, though even then you may struggle to get a fully straight cut. As you say, nothing supports the blade at the end so it can easily wander off of its intended course. A more expensive jigsaw may have better rollers/support for the blade though ...


4

rob does a good job of covering the overall use of the tools. I find these discussions interesting since it is possible to be right but have different answers. All of these types of saws function in the same way. Some are better at dealing with intricate work and some are designed for rough jobs. It does not help that the names of these tools could be ...


3

Some general design/structural considerations for this type of project: While the design shown should be adequate for light loads, it may be helpful to others to understand the way the table works in transferring the loads to the base for future projects. The performance of the table joints under load will not depend upon the species of wood so much as the ...


3

As many posts have mentioned for a number of tools and techniques, the woodworking terminology waters are muddy. Your first image is what I would refer to as a scroll saw; however, in the past these were referred to as jig saws. The second two are what I would refer to as jig saws; however, they have also been referred to as saber saws. My understanding ...


2

These (and much more complex) joints have been done by hand tools alone for centuries, and there is still a strong following of hand tools only woodworking. The box joint you show here is pretty simple, with all angles at 90 degrees. To use the tools you mentioned, the best tip would be to cut everything too small with the jigsaw (or even the hand saw), and ...


2

I believe you'll find that the split pin at the top of the blade holder is meant to engage a slot in the top of the blade, keeping it from pivoting on the attachment screw. That type of blade looks like this: You'd need to measure it carefully or test fit it to make sure it will work for you. Measuring might be easier given the package at a store is likely ...


2

I was thinking about LosManos's answer and my comments about my wandering blade. A better variation of his idea for a fence would be to make a "track board" (small piece of plywood or sheet good) and cut a straight line through it. It does not have to be long just enough to get the cut started. Use that on the bottom, with clamps, of the piece that is ...


2

If the blade is not exactly in line and you move the saw exactly in line it might wander off. Try it like this: Take a piece of plywood or other cheap material, between half a meter and a meter in length. ( 2 feet plus/minus however many centimetres you like ). Then clamp a straight piece of something to said wooden piece. Run the jigsay against the ...


2

There are a few ways you could do this: Drill starter holes and then use a jigsaw. You'll need a pretty beefy jigsaw and a long blade to cut through the flooring, underlayment, and subfloor. I wouldn't recommend trying to turn the blade at the corners. Drill multiple starter holes instead. Drill starter holes and then use a reciprocating saw. You'll ...


2

You don't need a jig per se to do this successfully, you just need to run the jigsaw against a straightedge (the wooden fence in the image posted) paying careful attention to pressing the baseplate of the saw against the fence. Don't concentrate on the pushing motion, let the saw take care of the cut and work at its own rate, concentrate on pushing against ...


2

Given that the jigsaw does not seems to be the best tool to make what you want (the circular saw is far better), I think that the image you show is one of the better way to do it. The only think I would add is a spare piece of wood under your piece in order to have a better and cleaner cut. Otherwise the jig in this video seens to work reasonably well. At ...


2

The box joint is sort of the machine equivalent of the dovetail joint; by having all the cuts at 90 degrees you can more easily mechanize the joinery and thanks to the resulting increase in speed you can make many fine 'fingers' to give you massive glue area. This is good since the joint relies entirely on glue to hold it together. Dovetailing has the ...


2

Box joints for this table with just jigsaw and chisel? A jigsaw is not the right choice for this. Much preferable to cut this using a hand saw of some kind. but of course from a stability point of view that is probably one of the worst table designs to come up with ;). Actually the design is very stable, in all ways you might mean it. The ...


1

Okay, (rubs hands together)... ready for an answer. I'll try to combine information from the comments (and will happily edit based on feedback if I've misconstrued anything). To your question specifically. The T101 blades (or a similar generic) will turn tight curves because of its thin back and cut fairly cleanly. Don't worry about the supposed 15mm depth ...


1

Before I get to the whole box joint part I will tell you there is a difference with hardness is woods. Wood-database is a great website to get information on a given wood. I think acacia is harder then birch. Not to familiar with it. But you could really use any wood you would so like. Also I would get some bar clamps for the gluing part. And for glue I ...


1

Here's the first thing I would try. Paint the top (the blue color, in your example). Let that dry. Put blue painter's tape over the blue paint. Cut the lettering. Without removing the painter's tape, paint the sides of the lettering (the orange color, in your example). Let that dry. Remove the masking tape. There are several potential downsides to this ...


1

Box joints are machine joints. Period. They are great for multiples of boxes, or if, as in this example, the design is asking for something more industrial. If I am only doing one, its just as fast to cut dovetails, because of machine setup time. I size fingers based on the job, and I would certainly heed Ashlar. But I really like the old Sears Roebuck ...


1

I have a couple of examples of manufacturer terminology to present, which frankly only serve to reinforce the idea that these terms have had their meaning folded, spindled and mutilated by various marketing departments. At least in the late 1960s, Black & Decker was calling this thing a jigsaw: More recently we have a Craftsman Sabre saw: And a Sears ...


1

The best and fastest way to get any such detail is by using a template and a router. This is nothing that you haven't read or heard already I'm sure. However, the best way to do this is to trace the template and then rough cut to within a 1/4" with a jig or circular saw. The router bit will not produce a good result cutting through board, but will do best ...


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