Hot answers tagged

4

There are drill guides and drill blocks available for making repeatable holes in stock. The usual suspects like Wolfcraft and Milescraft offer these, for example. Whether you use a block-style guide (either DIY or store-bought) or a fancy guide depends a lot on what tool you will be using. For example, a block is not going to help you if you are using a ...


4

I've just experienced this very situation recently. Here's what I learned about U-style slots. I did not fully research T-slots, which is a whole other world of non-standard standards. Imperial sized U-slots come roughly in two flavours: 3/4" and 5/8". The huge majority of after-market equipment out there, at least in the Americas, is one of those two sizes....


3

I would spend the time making a pattern drill guide out of 3/4" plywood. Size of guide would be 24 in wide, and 18"-24" high. Start by drilling the holes 5 cm from the edge. The next set of holes are 10 cm on center. This allows you to align the pattern guide to the edge where the drilling ended. You can use one of the drill attachment described in the ...


2

As you're likely aware, cutting beyond the 45° limit of the saw can be challenging. It's necessary to think more vertically than usual. Consider to build a fence that includes a 90° bracket along the entire length (or as needed to provide stiffness) that will permit you to place the angle as desired: Blade represented in red, circular saw plate is yellow, ...


1

Your comment really clarifies your needs. Please add the RR benchwork description to your original question. It is a big help. Now that I can picture your project, I would suggest some small light colored screws instead of wooden dowels. Now I see the need for the Acrylic between your track levels but wooden dowels will be very visible in the clear plastic. ...


1

I would suggest purchasing the miter gauges you're interested in using. Getting manufactured miter gauges does seem to be the way to go, as they seem (to me, at least) to be the more difficult part to accurately make at home (especially if you want one with angles premarked). Once you have the gauges in hand, you can then measure the actual bar widths. You ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible