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8

Best method for killing boring beetles is to use heat. Warming the wood to a set temperature for a designated length of time will eradicate the beetles and their larvae. Beetle type determines the length of time and duration of applied heat. Powderpost beetles 54.4 degrees Celsius/130 degrees Fahrenheit for 2-4 hours in a kiln Deathwatch beetles 56 degrees ...


5

There aren't a lot of pests that eat wood. This page provides a pretty good list, including: Carpenter ants (see this page for id and control details) are large black ants that nest in structures causing damage. Dry-rot fungi (see this page for id and control info) attack and weaken wood. Powderpost beetle (see this page for id and control info) larvae bore ...


5

I have not found any reference for the bark comment but depending where it is stored and even if you haven't had problems in the past you cannot assume you are safe from infestation. I personally have not had any issues with Powerpost beetles but the prevention thereof is fairly generic as far as infestations go. Note: there are several dozens of varieties ...


4

Some pests like the Emerald Ash Borer need a living tree to infest and live, they eat the 'pulpy' layer under the bark, and in large quantities will girdle a tree and kill it. So an Ash without bark is perfectly safe. The Powder post beetle on the other hand eats the 'dead' wood on the inside of the tree. This means that the bark has nothing to do with it. ...


4

Looks like powder post beetles to me. If that is the case you have some nice firewood. Sorry.


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It's worth knowing that Bed bugs don't have a particular affection for wood but any small space where they can hide near a host. Don't use it Best advice I would say for materials that have a known infestation. I would also suggest avoiding toxic fumigation. "It's OK if it's poisonous to humans" is a scary concept. Yes, you will be fumigating this ...


3

Borer is a little ambiguous since that describes several species of beetle. There is a basic introductory article from LifeStyle that breaks down some of those species and how you can identify which one might be in your coasters. That would be very useful to know which species you are dealing with as it is possible you don't need to worry. You might just ...


1

Given that there is no way to 100% keep powderpost beetles from entering your home, even with professionally cured and stored lumber, what you are doing is trying to minimize your exposure. Control of these pests is through depth, rather than a single solution. I'm going to say that, within some reasonable hand-waving, your mitigation technique will approach ...


1

You make indoor spaces ant and termite resistant by having an exterminator come into your house and, using the appropriate chemicals in the recommended manner on a recommended schedule, spray wood trim and installed furniture, and places where such pests have ingress to indoor spaces. The idea is to lay down a coating of chemicals where the pests walk or ...


1

Bedbugs are easily killed with heat, and fortunately high heat is not required. 45C or 113F is sufficient to kill all stages of bedbug life if heated for an hour. Depending on the amount of lumber, size of the room, how its stacked, and how well insulated the room is, heating can take a long time. I'd suggest one or more high output heaters. If you can ...


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