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12

I am trying to figure out why that was the standard at the time. Not sure if this is a chicken/egg issue, but I think the answer has to do with a tool called a brace. The first braces were no more than curved pieces of wood with a tapered metal inlet at one end that received different bits. The bit was held in via the wedging action of the tapered end. (...


8

When did technology become available to make plywood? Plywood in the sense of cross-grained veneers glued together is actually very old, for example various sources claim the Egyptians and ancient Chinese used materials that are basically plywood although it wasn't made in quite the same way as the modern stuff is with whole logs steamed and then peeled ...


5

Just to add to Graphus' insights: Patents for plywood show up at the beginning of the 19th century and plywood as we know it (with thin sheets of wood) show up around 1850s. In furniture history, John Henry Belter (active in New York from 1845 to 1865) is the person most associated with the use of plywood. He used rosewood plywood to build heavily carved ...


3

Well this is easy: no finish. Go back far enough and there's no doubt wood would have been left unfinished and the no-finish option is still widely used today, sometimes by necessity1 and sometimes by choice2. This may or may not answer the question depending on what you're looking for. If you do need something that was actually applied to wood then oils ...


2

There were curved molding planes of various designs. A scratch stock would work for simple situations, but the quality of a scratched profile would be nowhere near a cut one


1

Without a router, something with a tight radius like this could be done by hand with a beading (and other) planes, but it would take a deft hand by a master. Mere mortals would make profiles that always looked hand-carved. Maybe you would choose material that like to be pared in all directions, and didn't like to split as much. Maybe walnut is right out of ...


1

Just like in the west, paint or any other locally available material can be used to seal out moisture. Sealing end grain with a torch is another way moisture was sealed, but I don't know if it was only done with finished pieces. In my opinion, (as someone who lives in a cool, moist climate), sealing the ends isn't really necessary when air drying, provided ...


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