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17

Rockler has a great guide on understanding hinges. Full overlay hinges are for individual cabinets or the cabinets on either end of a run of cabinets. (Source) Half overlay hinges are intended for pairs of doors in the middle of a run of cabinets, where two doors have their hinges mounted on opposite sides of a shared middle partition. (Source) Although ...


7

With those types of hinge, you do not need any clearance between doors. My kitchen cupboards use that type of hinge and mostly have a 1/4" gap. In one place there is no gap at all. I just trapped a piece of paper there with the door closed, when I opened the door the paper fell out. The door opens and closes smoothly. The hinge movement pulls the hinged ...


6

It needs to somehow rotate in both directions. I don't see how this could be solved with permanently attached hinges. You could always use hinges that are designed to have the pins removed regularly. These are called "loose pins," and resemble that depicted below. You would install them so that they fold in the direction you want for your box and arch ...


6

The doors should have no problem clearing each other assuming the hinge pivot is in line with the seam between doors and the stationary part of the cabinet as viewed from the top. The edges of the door you are concerned about will scribe a circular arc, as they swing outward, with the maximum approach to each other only when closed.


5

My plan was to build a box, then cut it open, but that might not work. That is the usual way of building a lid for a box. You build a hollow cube with no lid, then cut the lid off. This guarantees the lid will match up with the box. Minimizing the kerf is going to depend on the tools you have at your disposal. I've cut box tops off with a table saw, which ...


5

That looks like a "partial-wrap inset hinge". Places like Lee Valley have them.


4

My current idea is just to have the leg basically fold into itself but I'm unsure how sturdy this would be. You can get around the obvious strength concern of a leg that folds in the centre by using bracing, but I think there are better ways to go about this as covered by the links below. In addition to using fewer hinges there are a few existing designs ...


4

We are dealing with two different measurements here, frame width and frame thickness. I'm not entirely sure which you are referring to, so I'll cover both. Also, you can reference this useful page: Glossary of Cabinet Hinge Terms An Overlay door will cover over (lay over) part of the face frame of the cabinet opening. As opposed to an Inset, or Inlay, door ...


4

This is a "stop hinge" or a "box hinge with stop". There are ones that have built-in soft close and/or lift function that mount on the inside of the box. Good if you want to replace those external surface mount ones with something a little nicer.


3

There is actually such a thing as a Bench Seat Hinge but the heavy duty ones only seem to take up to 12kg. You might be able to find one that'll take more weight, but my suggestion would be to split the seat lid into two or three sections and hinge them individually (assuming your better half doesn't object to a split lid). If you're going to be upholstering ...


3

If you are going to use a lid stay, similar to the first link, then I would use a european stile cabinet hinge, which is what is shown in the picture as well. I would recommend a soft close lid stay like this: Soft Close Lid Stay And a hinge like this: Blum Clip Top Hinge This will allow you to open the top up against a wall, and this type of hinge ...


3

I believe you have the right idea, and overlay hinges are the way to go. However, you would only need 2 or 3, rather than 6. The more hinges you add to a surface, especially if they are independent, the greater the chance that they will interfere with easy operation due to their rotation axes not being aligned. However, why hinge at all? Support both ends, ...


3

What you need is a double acting hinge. Different manufacturer's make variations but essentially they have two sets of pivots so that the door leaf can swing in either direction. I have seen spring action double hinges at home centers, but you can also call a local hardware supply company for variations.


2

The correct choice is an inset face frame hinge. An example hinge can be seen here, and the following is an explanation of the different terms: Inset means the door is inside of the cabinet instead of on the front of the cabinet Face frame designates that the hinge will be attached to the face frame, as opposed to Euro style hinges which are attached to ...


2

If you want it to fold down, this is basically a drop-leaf table. If you want it to fold upward, it's more like a drop-down table Searching those terms should find some designs you could base yours on.


2

Bee's wax. Time honored and true. It comes in small blocks, just rub the screw threads across the block. As a union carpenter on a major industrial job, I learned this from a old timer fifty years ago and still use it myself. I mostly use it to more easily insert screws but I suppose it would lead to easier extraction as well. I'd avoid oils for reasons ...


2

You might be able to get Soss hinges to work, but they are danged finicky, and require someone with more than average skill to install them. You might be able to finagle a 35mm cup hinge of some kind ("Blum" is one company that makes them) but if its curved where the cup hole is bored that will increase the amount of expertise required, if its even possible....


2

A few suggestions: blum-170-degree-face-frame-hinge soss-door-hardware-208-invisible-door-hinge soss-door-hardware-218-invisible-door-hinge


2

I would recommend using a Soss style hinge: example This will be fully concealed, and will be strong enough to support the weight of the top all the way through the movement. A Euro style hinge is not made to support the weight of a top in this orientation, and, at best, you would be looking for a blind corner Euro hinge to operate in this situation. Any ...


2

You are seeking what is called a flush two-pin hinge: https://www.amazon.com/Whitecap-Flush-Mount-2-Pin-Hinge/dp/B004MDY00W The image shows one of many options and of many designs. Some are engineered to mount on a surface, but even that isn't a requirement. Some "ordinary" hinges will have flush pin configuration without having two pins. The design in ...


2

I've had very good luck with torsion hinges. They hold the lid in place when it's opened and allow you to smoothly close it without slamming. And they have a minimal visual impact on the piece. They're slightly bigger than normal hinges, but it's hidden behind the lid. You do have to have to know the weight of your lid, but in my experience the range of ...


2

What is the drawer overlay on the 27mm panel? If it is more than 9mm you will have to use half-overlay hinges (as you won't have the 18mm needed for a full overlay.)


1

In the end a normal concealed hinge from HAFELE did the trick. I guess a blum hinge would have obtained the same result. These kind of hinges have a decent range of adjustment so even if the layout specifies 9mm overlay, it can be easily adjusted to go from 8 to 10 and be extremely precise. This is the one I went for: Reading from the table on the right, ...


1

The ideal fix here is arguably to get the lid to sit flat on its own, but that may involve disassembly. The other option is a tweak to one or both hinge installations but that's not that easy to do. So why not install rubber pads if they'll do what you need? As to how many, well how many does it take? No way anyone can answer that without the thing in ...


1

Use a router to deepen an existing hinge mortise. With a steady hand, this can be done without any guide. Use a straight bit and carefully remove the wood to make the mortise deeper.


1

You have not mentioned a particular hinge, but many soft-close hinges are "euro"-style cup hinges, and I assume that's what you're asking about. Euro-style hinges were designed in, well, Europe, in the aftermath of World War II, when a great many houses and therefore kitchens had to be rebuilt, particularly after the fire-storms in Germany. The problem ...


1

A fellow was referred to our makerspace with a similar problem, slightly more complex than yours. The solution was to have a member purchase raw brass stock (expensive) and mill the shape necessary to create the desired part. As in your case, the expense was secondary to the lack of availability of a retail part. You may be able to locate a makerspace in ...


1

This seems to do what you are thinking: http://www.hardwaretree.com/proddetail.php?prod=H-417L The installation does look rather tricky, though.


1

My tradition, going back three or four generations, is: soap. I keep the tag ends of bath bar soap in a ziplock with a tiny bit of water and wipe wood screw threads across the soap before inserting them in the tapered predrilled holes. It's most helpful in hardwoods. But I'm not dogmatic, wax would work I'm pretty sure and boiled Linseed oil sounds ...


1

What is the best lubricant? soap, vaseline or something else? I'm not sure anyone can say. I've read recommendations for both soap and Vaseline as lubricants from multiple sources spanning over 100 years, indicating they were both used widely In addition, and in no particular order: linseed oil, candle wax, paste wax and a few other things that aren't ...


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