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I would thread holes into tabletop because I know this is strong enough because wood screws are strong enough for same purpose, and there is no insert. But if you choose inserts here is my answer. Allowance for wood movement to be addressed. We are not yet sure if this is needed or how much. No need for more than M6 as these are already so strong. Wood ...


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Edit for the new information that this is a knockdown (K/D) project. This probably does require the use of threaded inserts Although you can thread wood directly1 inserts are intended to provide very durable threading for machine screws/bolts in wood and other softer materials, allowing for regular and repeated adjustments over time, especially under heavy ...


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The question at hand is "how deep should I make a hole in relatively soft wood for a blind insert for an M-sized bolt?" A good rule of thumb is don't remove more than 2/3rds the material in any given dimension when doing joinery. It isn't a hard and fast rule, but a nice start. In this case it'll work just fine because nothing here is critical. The ...


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I'm not certain of the UK terminology, but in the USA, a flat plate used to join boards can be called a wood-to-wood mending plate. They are common in the big-box hardware stores as well as the smaller shops. The image above comes from amazon, although the search returned hundreds of options. Various sizes are available. If you have the tools and skills, ...


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The manufacturers assembly instructions have a wooden cleat bolted to the back board....I could recreate this using threaded inserts and 1in bolts. Since your overall goal is to copy the design in the first photo, using the same method for joining the parts seems like a good idea. Assuming these beds aren't all falling apart because of a flaw in the way the ...


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"Sliding rail" and "rail hooks" are the search terms you are looking for. See places like McMaster-Carr sliding tracks, at least as a start. If this does not suffice, as it looks like your reference design is custom, you can consider modifying the common t-slot designs used in many commercial applications. We've all seen the "wall of ...


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The Veritas plane uses a sort of split collar that gives the friction fit you want. There are plenty of designs for that out there. You just need to figure out how to attach them solidly to the base. (I'd recommend learning how to braze.) My Stanley No. 45 uses a thumbscrew through the collar. Sort of a grub screw, but instead of a slot or hex head it offers ...


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It should go without saying that that's not the greatest drawing, but let me go out on a limb. Look at the cleat at the end of the side rail. There appear to be 3 holes which would allow the cleat to be screwed (and glued) into the side rail. There appears to be a hole at the top of the cleat, which to my eye lines up with the upper of 4 holes in the short ...


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