9

By to look of the "keyhole" shaped holes in the back of the knobs, you're probably supposed to slide them onto the head of a screw that's attached to the wall. Here's the keyhole in glorious ASCIIart, with labels, to make this easier to explain: +--+ | | <------ thin end | | _-' '-_ / \ | | <---- ...


7

The ones in your sketch are T-nuts, and are typically hammered into the wood. The prongs bite into the wood, keeping it from moving, and the inside of the barrel is threaded to accept a bolt. Another commonly-used piece of hardware that performs a similar function is a threaded insert. These have threads on the outside of the barrel as well, and are screwed ...


7

That is called a Tnut. Tnut search. It is similar to a threaded insert but it is pressed into the wood and has little points that grab the wood and keeps it from rotating when you thread a bolt into it. A threaded insert as threads on the outside and is threaded into the wood like a screw.


6

The coarse thread of the screw in your photo looks meant for use with particle board or soft woods, much like confirmat screws. Screws with a blunt point like the one in your photo are known as "type b self tapping" screws. You use them with predrilled holes, and the thread on the screw cuts threads into the material. But I don't think I've ever seen that ...


6

This is an interesting window. Like you, I could find nothing about this style of window – searched on Oscar Niemeyer, double-hung, etc. much as you probably did and came up with nothing. I found a patented window for which the top sash moved down as the bottom moved up, leaving the middle half of the opening covered and top and bottom open, plus the sashes ...


5

What you seek is called an upholstery tack strip. The screw-like protrusions are barbs rather than screws and snag/catch the fabric to be stretched and secured. A quick search using these terms return many results with varied prices and locations to purchase.


4

This is a "stop hinge" or a "box hinge with stop". There are ones that have built-in soft close and/or lift function that mount on the inside of the box. Good if you want to replace those external surface mount ones with something a little nicer.


4

To me it looks like a type of joint connector screw or connector bolt. Sometimes the various types of screws for knock-down furniture are also called furniture screws or furniture bolts. Sometimes when I don't know what something is called, I take it to the local hardware store and try to find something that looks the same. Often they don't have the right ...


3

Dowels. This could be done multiple ways but I'd say there's a good chance the tread and the riser pivot on dowels. This is the simplest way to make anything like this where a component needs to rotate about an axis, although you could use steel pins* for increased strength and durability a wood-only solution can be strong enough and durable enough for a ...


3

For solid knobs just a wood screw in the back is all that's needed. It doesn't need to be centered exactly just however much your OCD requires of you. Getting it centered will be easier by drilling in a pilot hole first. This will also prevent the knob from cracking. For your type you should try and find screws with a small enough head to fit in the ...


3

I would like to place these in a small vial that can be screwed into a threaded insert in the bottom of the wand. I think something like a necklace vial will work for your purpose: If you've ever been to a mall and seen the kiosks where someone will write your name on a grain of rice, these are pretty much the same thing.


2

I searched for something like this in the past and came across DiscountVials which at the very least will give you ideas of what is available out there. I ended up not ordering anything, so can't actually make a recommendation. If you want very tiny, my immediate thought was a perfume sample vial. You might even be able to grab one of these at the perfume ...


2

You might want to get baluster screws or dowel screws, similar to this kit from Rockler (http://www.rockler.com/rail-bolt-fastener-with-plugs) -- drill the back of the hanger, screw the non-self-tapping side into the hanger, maybe put a little glue in there for good measure, then use the self-tapping side to thread into a drywall anchor or directly into a ...


2

To me it looks like a "Lag Screw" with the tip cut off. Here are some that appear to be closer And even closer I just searched for 'Flat Pack Bolts'


2

Try googling "surface mount table leg corner bracket". You'll get lots of wood ones, but the principle extends to metal if you screw/tap stuff together.


2

As far as I know these aren't made any more, but it's a big world out there so you never know! Part of the difficulty of course is looking for them without knowing what they're called....... or, what the manufacturer, who may not speak English as a first language calls them! Assuming they aren't manufactured any more you could have them made for you. Or, ...


2

The name for hardware that has a metal shaft sliding through it is bushing: However it will be difficult to find one long enough to go all the way through a 2x4. So like scanny suggested, you might just buy a length of metal tube and use that.


1

I found them as 'sleeve bearings' on Fastenal.


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