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When sharpening a blade when should I apply pressure to the blade (pull stroke, push, or both)? Yes :-) This is one of those things where if you ask 10 woodworkers you might get 11 answers. As you'll discover the more deeply you delve into sharpening (rabbit hole warning!) some of the supposed reasons for doing X and Y are merely Old Wisdom handed down ...


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The general rule I've been taught is even pressure unless you are cutting a cambered profile into the tool.


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Guitar makers do this all the time, but they don't use a saw, generally. Create a jig that holds a chisel as a scraper, and then you pull the strips through it, narrowing the space slightly each time. The idea is to saw oversized and then plane or scrape to thickness. The takeaway here is that 1/8inch strips are best thought of as "binding". And ...


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Have you tried using chalk? A light coating of chalk on the piece you want to fit, then try it out, make it snug so it 'rubs' on the other pieces. All the high points that need to be sanded down should show wear where they rub and the low spots would be untouched. After 1 or 2 rounds, might need to clean up the chalk because it will tend to spread out over ...


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I thought I remembered something from Colin Knecht (WoodWorkWeb) on this and here it is, Woodworking with Thin Plywood, like Baltic Birch Plywoods. The relevant portion is right at the beginning, with a tip not just on how to cut it with a knife1 but also on a good way to back the cut, although if you have a decent cutting mat that should be fine too. I've ...


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Here are a couple ideas that might help: Get a mat cutter that makes vertical cuts, such as a Logan 350-1. These normally use razor blades or sometimes utility knife blades. 4 mm plywood is probably a little heavier than what they're meant for, but a half-decent one would still help you make a nice straight cut several times on exactly the same line. You'll ...


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An alternate answer! While reading "A Little Book of Woodworking Joints" I ran across this figure: The chapter on "Simple Dovetailing" has this to say about Fig. 20: A very good method of setting the bevel is to obtain a piece of board and set up a square line as shown in Fig. 20, and mark off six units — size 1/2 in., say — and then to ...


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The defining feature of this bench is the mixture of elements from three traditions. Mostly French and German + a few English additions. Top thick only where needed to support vises. "Tree-trunk legs" Legs flush with front of top. Tool tray. Drawer under top. Massive twin screw face vise, 24" ( 610mm) between screws. Traditional European tail ...


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