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2

I found myself in exactly the same situation as the OP, on exactly the same project. I'm also building the Sellers workbench, and on my first mortise the holes were both very badly off vertical. My leg pieces are 90 x 90, and the mortise holes "missed" by about 5mm at the halfway point. Looking at it afterwards, the error was very obvious but my ...


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The cut end provides a point for drawing your angled line up to a corner or an obstruction. Much the same as a drafting square (those triangular drawing tools) allow you to reach the point toward your final drawing destination.


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I think the only answer, so far, is that there isn't a specific or vital woodworking reason. Perhaps, a weak argument can be made that it allows the tang or blade to fit nicely into the stock. This agrees with the few references to this I've been able to find anywhere, including this one from the comments: "The slot end is rounded whilst the other is ...


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Mitered cuts this wide are not necessarily sawn in hand-tools only methods of work. They're almost definitely shot on one of the shooting board types though. The idea is to remove bulk of the waste with a tool that can move lots of material quickly, so for example you could knock it off with a chisel leaving somewhere around 1/8" - 1/16" of waste ...


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Cuts like this are actually fairly straightforward to do by hand, using the right technique1. But even so, it would be rare indeed for any cut like this done in hand-tool woodworking to be used straight from the saw — the sawn end surface is nearly always going to be refined by planing, to both perfect the angle and get to accurate length2. This is good news ...


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