13

That's a screwdriver bit. At the time this was made slot-head screws were pretty much all there were and being able to use your brace to drive larger screws saved space in a travelling toolkit. Plus I'm sure the bit cost less than a hardwood-handled turnscrew from any reputable maker. And anyway, braces are quite simply excellent screw-drivers — you could ...


4

That is a type of hook knife, commonly used to help hollow wooden spoons, bowls and kuksa. Source: Robin Wood. While they have been and still are available commercially many such tools have been made by their users. We can't see the blade clearly enough to be able to guess which is the case here, but often there's no visible difference anyway. The handle ...


3

You say Stanley no 5 so your plane is a Bailey pattern, which has a lateral-adjusting lever on the frog. Changing the angle of the cutting edge is the purpose of this lever. Push it towards the corner you want to pull up. Here's how the lateral works as shown by instructions in Stanley documents: P.S. If your plane is a very early model, "pre lateral&...


3

Joint the board in sections and iterate through Left, middle, right side until reasonable jointed Yes. but there is a risk that each section is not parallel. Check often, adjust as necessary. This is basically similar to the problem of how you face anything that is wider than the plane (a somewhat-common occurrence LOL). Because shavings can be on the ...


3

You're correct, sawing off this little material isn't possible by hand under normal circumstances. You could possibly do it working very carefully using a saw with a very thin plate (e.g. a Japanese saw) but it would still be challenging to saw off a strip this thin in a single unbroken piece. And once you get a breakage it's very difficult to restart a cut. ...


2

Adjust your thinking. You've noted that you're trying to make some trim pieces. I can't, for the life of me, envision what you need 1x1/8" trim for, but I'll assume you need it and that's the perfect size for what you're after. (Oh! You're making doll-houses or other scale models! Of course.) I'd suggest that you rip your wood in 1/4" wide strips, ...


2

It's hard to tell from just the results, but I would suspect that this is a body mechanics issue, not a setup issue with the plane. (If the issue was that the blade was slanted relative to the plane body and all else was correct you'd still cut a groove straight down, but the side of the cutter would start hitting the corner of the groove.) Due to their ...


2

For work like this you need a collection of sanding blocks in various shapes, and sanding sponges, possibly cut into custom shapes. For faster removal this is one of the few situations where small rotary tools like a Dremel will come in handy. Almost certainly you will find all sorts of shaping and sanding attachments suitable for crafting rifle stocks. I ...


1

These are also known by "beam boring machine" and "beam auger".


1

I don't know about the second one but the first is very likely a commercial saw, or at least the blade is from one. The feature you're asking about is the 'saw nib'. For such an innocent looking feature the nib is actually quite the controversy in woodworking circles. People will argue long and hard about what it was for — yes, people will argue about ...


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