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3

You're correct, sawing off this little material isn't possible by hand under normal circumstances. You could possibly do it working very carefully using a saw with a very thin plate (e.g. a Japanese saw) but it would still be challenging to saw off a strip this thin in a single unbroken piece. And once you get a breakage it's very difficult to restart a cut. ...


3

ROSs are finish sanders, and not well suited to bulk material removal (except for beasts like the Rotex). But of course you can fit a coarse disk — and I mean really coarse1 — to any ROS to make it very aggressive. But maintaining flatness when removing this much material with a rotary sander is not easy..... I'm actually doubtful a dead-flat surface is ...


3

Joint the board in sections and iterate through Left, middle, right side until reasonable jointed Yes. but there is a risk that each section is not parallel. Check often, adjust as necessary. This is basically similar to the problem of how you face anything that is wider than the plane (a somewhat-common occurrence LOL). Because shavings can be on the ...


2

It's hard to tell from just the results, but I would suspect that this is a body mechanics issue, not a setup issue with the plane. (If the issue was that the blade was slanted relative to the plane body and all else was correct you'd still cut a groove straight down, but the side of the cutter would start hitting the corner of the groove.) Due to their ...


2

As wood grows throughout the year it differs in hardness and shear strength. This is what creates growth rings. What you see here is that the areas that are weaker (due to growing faster during the warmer months of the year) are tearing out, but the harder areas are not. There are also some species where the grain will "interlock" such that there ...


2

I've tried hand planing, but it's just not working; The direction you're planing makes a big difference. If you're getting a lot of tearout in one direction, turn the log around and try the opposite direction. Think about petting a cat: if you pet from the tail end toward the head, you're going against the fur and the cat gets upset, but if you pet from the ...


2

As with all tools, it depends. The cheaper ones or ones used by construction workers for timber framing are not suitable for woodworking. Surface quality left by electric planers varies. They are not all equal. Some even have spiral blades that leave a very smooth finish that requires little to no sanding. As for uses, a high-end electric planer, such as ...


1

You don't mention the rough dimensions of the piece, or whether it is hard or soft or in-between. It's possible, of course. This was how wood was brought into the shop and then resawn or already rough sawn. There is a whole practice of preparing stock for actual use with hand tools. As you've noticed, sandpaper is not the right tool. Sandpaper isn't for ...


1

Alternative recommendation for smoothing without the need for planing stop: a cabinet scraper (card scraper) The other answers look to the work holding issue very well, and can definitely be used with a smoother plane. However, if you are only looking to smoothen, then I recommend an alternative to the plane: a trusty cabinet scraper. Since it is easier to ...


1

I love mine. I have built several long boat oars and spars over the years and an electric hand plane is the ideal roughing out tool. I use them to reduce cross section/taper over long lengths and for making square stock round or oval (using a spar gauge).


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