5

Are there any other options open to me? There is one other option that you didn't mention. You can build a "router sled" to flatten wide boards. This is basically two rails on either side of the board with a narrow platform that slides along them. A router rides on the platform, and the platform has a slot cut through it that the bit projects through to ...


4

Planing end grain is not an easy task and getting a nice result should be taken as a good indicator of sharpness, especially in softwoods. It's impossible for most beginners and very difficult for a lot of learner woodworkers to get good results planing end grain at every attempt. And it seems paradoxical but the end grain of hardwoods is generally much ...


4

The front exclusively. The rear surface of the mouth represents part of a reference/registration surface that works in conjunction with the frog's face to support the iron assembly, and if it's in good condition and doesn't need remedial work it shouldn't be touched1. In addition the metal is generally thinner at the front than at the back (not even ...


3

First, don't do this if you want to maintain the value of the item as a collector's piece. You can set it up and tune it and get it working again, but do not remove paint or repaint. This will make it almost valueless for collectors. If you just want to completely restore it so it looks nice and you don't care about the value, then read on. Go to any ...


2

Intuitively I would choose to file the fore edge of the mouth, for two reasons: The angle is not critical. The rear edge matches the bedding angle of the frog, whereas the fore edge is just perpendicular (edit: as Graphus points out in this answer, the fore edge angle may also matter). Filing the fore edge means the frog adjustment doesn't need to change. ...


2

Like jdv's comment, the easiest way to ensure that the edge you're planing is square is to use a shooting board. (Note there are two styles of shooting board, one for endgrain where you plane towards the back of your bench and one for edge jointing where you plane across the bench.) I won't get into details since this is a much bigger topic that has been ...


2

Technicaly, you would be able to do it with a good smoothing plane with very tight mouth and really sharp blade - low angle plane could help (but only if the real cutting angle was lower than on "normal" plane - which it often isn't - because of bevel up blade). But as was pointed out in comments (which I think should really be answers), sanding may be much ...


2

There were curved molding planes of various designs. A scratch stock would work for simple situations, but the quality of a scratched profile would be nowhere near a cut one


1

Without a router, something with a tight radius like this could be done by hand with a beading (and other) planes, but it would take a deft hand by a master. Mere mortals would make profiles that always looked hand-carved. Maybe you would choose material that like to be pared in all directions, and didn't like to split as much. Maybe walnut is right out of ...


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