13

Yes, provided you use fiberglass, and the technique is often called "cedar strip construction". This method of construction is a very forgiving method of building small boats compared to other techniques. Pretty much any wood will work, though cedar and other rot-resistant woods are better because when you invariably bump into rocks or other stuff, and ...


10

Green — Very fun to turn and it's like shaping butter, however, the greener it is the more likely you will get cracks as it dries and quite possibly a bit of warping. for building projects (book shelves, tables buildings etc) Green is a terrible choice unless you are going for a specific affect as the wood dries. Kiln (fast kiln) — Very dry and stable, ...


10

A draw knife is one traditional tool used to remove bark. If you have a folding pocket knife, you might be able to hack it into a mini-draw-knife- wedge the tip into a small stick, use tape or twine to close up the split, then use the body of the knife as one handle, and the stick as the other.


9

No, there is not a visual aid; you must measure or calculate the moisture. Measuring with a meter To measure the moisture directly, you can use a moisture meter. Pin-type meters require you to drive a set of pins into the wood, while pinless meters just need to be pressed against the surface of the wood. Delmhorst, a manufacturer of both types of meters, ...


9

I have a relative who uses something akin to a steam box, without the steam, to control the moisture moving out of his green turned pieces. It is like a wooden cabinet lined with plastic, with small adjustable vents like on a cheapo charcoal grill. He allows them to stay relatively moist for a period of weeks, loosly wrapped in plastic sheeting. There is ...


9

"Green wood" is wood that has been recently cut/harvested and is not yet "dry". Well aged wood will have a moisture content in equilibrium with its environment, assuming it's had enough time to equilibrate and the environment humidity is not fluctuating too wildly. As the humidity in the environment change, the wood will absorb or release moisture to ...


8

I was trying to find the answer to something else and realized there was a section in this book called, Modern Woodworking Techniques. It is a conglomeration of articles from the magazine Fine Woodworking. On page 124, they talk about drying your wood. It says that the "old-timers" rule of thumb is a year of air drying per inch of thickness, but ultimately ...


8

First, make sure you're permitted to take the wood! Some places intend to sell their dropwood to local mills. Always check first about a downed tree. You want a portable sawmill or an apparatus to saw into boards with a chainsaw: Once you have sawn the log into slabs, you would use stickering to dry the wet slabs over a period of months. This process ...


7

I would propose that kiln-dried wood (in particular steam kilning) is sometimes inferior to naturally cured wood. Advantages of Kiln Drying Kiln dried lumber is more readily available Much faster than alternative drying methods Disadvantages to Kiln-Drying Loss of Character American Black Walnut is a great example of a wood that suffers when kiln dried. ...


7

This is exactly right. Kiln dried wood is typically prized for it's stability and use in construction. This may be preferable in pieces work that would get laminated or otherwise glued together, however if it is too dry, sometimes even the moisture from the glue can cause swelling and require extra drying time. I typically prefer to turn in air dried wood. ...


7

First thing, most branches are very poor for turning into lumber. They will be stress wood and very likely to bend and twist as they dry or after, sometimes even while you are cutting them. They of course can be used for turning. As Peter Grace said, always ask before you collect it, but if it's just laying around, most of the time you will be allowed, ...


7

As @TXTurner suggests, a drawknife is great for bark removal. The dirt, grit, and grime in the bark will dull the blade faster, so it might be a good idea to have a drawknife dedicated for the task. National Trails Training Partnership also suggests the following tools: Bark/Peeling Spud (source: TraditionalWoodworker.com) (Carpenter) Adze (source: Lee ...


7

I've read about branches having internal stresses and twisting/warping. The main reason not to use wood from branches normally is that it's full of reaction wood, wood that has internal stress from its original orientation of the branch where it was under stress, supporting the weight of the branch and its foliage. When the branch is sawn into planks the ...


6

Checking in on my wood (just to admire it I suppose) I noticed after the first day that a crack was appearing through the center of the log. A through-the-centre crack, also a from-the-centre crack, is referred to as a heart shake. I thought it was odd but wasn't really surprised as that is supposed to happen over time. Actually it can be almost ...


5

To repost and add to my response to your previous question: You will likely not be able to prevent checking and cracking of this piece as it dries. You have different rates of shrinkage depending on the direction of the grain, and with the cut being kept essentially in it's original configuration (i.e., a section cut from the whole tree), it will want to ...


5

There are a couple options. The first and cheapest (though by far the most work) is to get a chainsaw mill. some of these are a guide you can buy for your existing chain saw and others come with a special bar and chain and others come with the saw. You will need a fairly powerful saw and I would recommend spending the money on a rip saw chain. A rip ...


5

Simply, wipe any dirt, grime, and possibly pitch off the tool surfaces (you can use water or another solvent if it's really stubborn) and dry thoroughly. Mind the edges when you're doing do, both from rubbing too much grit in them an dulling them and being careful not to cut yourself. After that, I use whatever oil is handy. Usually this is 3-in-1 oil, ...


5

Was my green wood too green and I should have waited longer? In my experience, I don't think there's such a thing as "too green." Green wood is nice to work because its moisture content means it is still quite soft, even for so-called "hard" woods like oak and hickory. Working green oak is a dream compared to seasoned oak. However, as with all unseasoned ...


4

TL;DR: It is an enormous amount of effort but it can be done. The resulting wood can be prone to cracking. I've tried to do a bit of this and like most of us here on Stack Exchange, I read a lot of information about it online and offline (dead tree versions: IRONY). Here is a summary of my experience: Lesson 1: Buy coating to paint the end grain from ...


4

To help improve the grip, I wrapped a piece of leather around the top crossbar and tacked it into place. ...Adding the leather seemed to help a bit, but the issue still remained. I suspect that the leather is one or both of the following, 1, too thin, 2, too smooth (much modern leather has a glazed surface and not inherently suited to this application). ...


4

As a corollary to my answer on your other Question: Removing the rot will not only help keep the rest of the log rotting along with it in time, but it will also help with cracking in that you won't have the center pith. There are many ways you could deal with the rot. Your original question mentioned drilling out the rot, which will work fine. You can ...


4

If you're looking for a simple project you might consider a skin on frame canoe or kayak. Cedar is a good choice for skin boats and actually works better when it's 'green'. Take a look at skin-boats.com to get some ideas.


4

This is quite a broad question. I've use wood I've picked up beachcombing many times, all of which could be classed generically as "driftwood" but it's far from uniform. Some was originally branches and other random bits of trees, some milled wood that got into the ocean somehow. On top of that the amount of time the wood spent in the water made a huge ...


4

There are multiple types of "wood bleach", which invariably use one or more common bleaching agents. They can be used to bleach wood in specific ways (e.g. removing native colour or dark staining from iron) but I suspect this might be a permanent colour change and nothing at all will change it, just as in the black lines in spalted wood. Personally I would ...


4

Bruce Hoadley, "Identifying Wood: Accurate Results With Simple Tools" is my go-to when you just have a hunk of wood. However, your tree has neighbors with leaves/needles... it's very unlikely that it's the only one of its species in the area. I'm going to go out on a limb (* see what I did there?) and say that you've got some sort of spruce/pine/fir.


4

First off the bad news, that's almost certain to crack on you as it dries out. You might get lucky in which case you dodged a bullet, but the wood already has natural defects radiating from the centre and it is from there that many natural cracks arise. To help lessen the risk of cracking the first thing you should do when you get it home is coat the flats ...


4

If you've got a lot to spare, then overdo it. Curves, twists, warps etc will always kill your yield. Flatsawn is apt to be less stable (esp with respect to cupping) than quartersawn. The milling marks you'll get from the sawmill will have an impact, too. Really rough, and you'll want a bit more thickness in the rough size. Regarding the final use... short ...


3

I've only done this a couple times, but I have good luck turning a rough form (as @TxTurner notes) and then setting the bowl aside for a few months. My technique is, I keep all the shavings from the bowl I just turned and stuff those, along with the rough bowl, into a (plastic) shopping bag that I tie off. I'm careful to pack the bowl in the center of the ...


3

The best strategy I've seen is to rough turn, let dry, then finish turn. The rule of thumb is to turn to a thickness 1/10th of the finished diameter. So a 10" bowl would be rough turned to 1" wall thickness. Then pack the rough turned bowl in shavings in a paper bag, and set it aside to dry in a controlled fashion. Every couple of weeks, check for ...


3

The big problem with green wood is moisture. it has lots of water and of course iron tools don't like that. Some wood has pitch which of course sticks to to tools and can be cleaned with a solvent like paint thinner. Some saps are also mildly corrosive so, my recommendation would generally be to wipe down the tools dry them up and put a light oil on them. ...


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