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10

In general, panel glue-up requires accurate square faces on the boards being glued. However, not all is lost. One possibility is that your combination square is not perfectly square. To try and verify this, cut several thin strips of wood using your saw. When pressed together (in the same orientation as they were cut, see below for why) any deviation from ...


5

I have done something similar using baltic birch plywood for boxes that are up to about 8" by 8" by 8". The first challenge is to make certain that the miters are cut exactly 45 degrees. If you cannot achieve that, tight, closed joints are impossible (see How do I cut a 45 degree bevel on a table saw with consistent dimensions?) When making a five surface ...


4

using the proper amount of glue will not fill in the remaining 1/8", not by a long shot. The thickness of each layer, once fully dried, should be microns, not even hundredths on an inch. In general, I would caution you against trying to calculate these sort of dimensions beforehand, and just use the actual workpiece dimensions as you progress with the ...


4

I thought it would be better to have pictures of the tape method for greater clarity as well as to future-proof things in case of changes to any of the external links provided in this and other Answers. First thing you do is lay down the sides of the box flat on the table and apply tape across each corner joint: Note tape is on the faces opposite the ...


4

You're in luck here in that this is just with the edge board, it would be worse if it were one of the joints somewhere in the middle. It's hard to be sure from just the one pic but it does look like a couple of the other joints aren't great either which is sort of to be expected, but lots of not-very-good glue joints1 give decent enough service so this could ...


3

I agree with your concern that frame might not give an art deco appearance. The thinnest panel I would recommend without a frame is 3/4" thick for widths up to about 30". It is important that you keep your individual strips at a max of 3" and orient them so that the grain directions alternate between pieces so that if one wants to warp to the inside, the ...


3

you should be fine. the drawer sides are thin enough that expansion/contraction of them is not an issue. furthermore, although you are pinning the dimension of the drawer from the inside, the outside is free to expand - but again, it's such a small amount. solid drawer bottoms are not glued in because the bottom panel is wide enough for expansion/contraction ...


3

So, after the interview, we now know for certain what interpretation they were looking for. "Matrixverleimung"/Matrix gluing does indeed refer to structures like pressboard/MDF/etc. where the wood-fibers/chips are embedded in the glue, as opposed to connected by the glue in "surface glueing" Any manufactured wood where the glue itself provides a non-...


3

I called System Three and they were very helpful - they strongly recommended only epoxying wood that's reached it's equilibrium moisture content and not in any environment where it could be exposed to water. The issue is that as the wood expands and contracts, the brittle epoxy is more likely than not to crack or tear the bonded surface off, obviating any ...


3

Basically, yes. Grain orientation in a board is all that determines what we refer to as quarter-sawn wood (it isn't always, as the name suggests, about how the wood was sawn1) and if you orient the wood in a glued-up top correctly, so the radial direction is horizontal, that's what you get. When this works out properly the glued-up top you end up with ...


3

Yes your screws should back out easily. The good news about the glue joint is that the edges of plywood often doesn't glue very well so the board may not be bonded to the poplar particularly strongly. To break the glue line, if you have the right type of clamps you can reverse the heads and use them as spreaders. If not you can simply knock them off ...


2

If the box is big enough, you can use shop made corner clamps like the ones featured in this Wood magazine article. If the box is too small for that, it might be a good candidate for gluing up using tape as clamps, as demonstrated in this Popular Woodworking article. Indeed, if it's small enough, like a small keepsake box, you can use one piece of tape, ...


2

Any guesses what caused this 99.9% certain it's glue residue as you already suspected. You can remove excess glue basically at three stages, almost immediately when it's fully liquid, after it has gone off a bit and is sort of rubbery and much later after full hardening. IMO the first and third options are the best, but plenty of people do it the second ...


2

I think Graphus's answer is pretty much right on, but I want to give you another alternative in case you're not interested in tearing the whole thing apart. You could reinforce the joint with a gap-filling adhesive, such as epoxy. Unfortunately, I don't think you'll get a good bond to the dried glue surface, so I think you'd have to remove it somehow. I ...


1

You can certainly use a roller to apply contact cement, but often this is done using a solid roller (usually a hard rubbery material of some kind), not a foam or short-nap roller because of the difficulty or impossibility of removing the residue of the adhesive from a paint roller. Note there are various types of contact cement however, some are waterbased ...


1

To get a flat panel, you usually need to start by jointing the glued edges to be extremely straight and perpendicular to the reference face of each board, and then plan on planing, scraping, and-or sanding the glued-up panel to remove any alignment error that happened during glue-up. Remember that as it gains and losses moisture (and swells/shrinks acroos ...


1

Build the box first, then chamfer the edges. Much simpler than trying to do it the other way around. Assuming you really do mean chamfer rather than miter.


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