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7

It appears from the description and the photo that the stub cross section is in essence a circle with a chord removed, basically it's a cylinder with a flat bottom. The easiest way to create a matching mortise in wood is to drill a hole of the major diameter, then partially plug it. For a wood-only solution a small piece of dowel sanded or planed down is ...


5

This is going to be tricky, since glue joints are stronger than the wood. So be prepared for at least some breakage to occur. If you can get to work immediately there's a chance of working on the glue before it's completely cured, although overnight drying is enough for almost full strength with most glues of this type in most conditions. You're going to ...


4

You could drill a hole the the exact size of the semicircle and then on the one side you could chisel out a square section large enough so you could insert a small block of wood (1/4"1/4"x1/2"long) which fills the chiseled section as well as into the drilled hole to complete the semicircle. Not sure if this is the easiest way but it is an ...


4

You might want to post a photo. If the "wood" veneer is some sort of PVC plastic, then many typical woodworking glues will not adhere well. Depending on how well it is bonded with the material underneath, you also run the risk of it separating from that with the extra mass on it. But this seems to be one of those cases where the hassle of contact ...


4

Look at Patrick Sullivan's "end grain glue" video experiment on YouTube to be amazed by his analysis showing that end-grain glue joints are actually stronger than other grain orientations that have the same amount of bonded surface area. The reason that end-grain joints are dismissed is because the joint is usually small when separate end-grain ...


4

Yes you should reinforce because you probably did not glue perfectly so your joints won't be 100%. Storage furniture may be moved when full and heavy, pulling on all corner joints, so it is good to build very strongly. Nails, screws or dowels from outside into edges are all possible. Pre-drill for screws or nails to prevent splitting. Drill undersized holes ...


4

Joinery is not all about the strength of the joint, though it is certainly an aspect. A large part of what makes woodworking satisfying is the beauty of the construction. Aside from that, the structure of a joint is important to the strength of the joint as well, because it influences how the glue bonds the pieces together, particularly with relation to ...


4

Maybe good, maybe weak. Impossible to say in theory, you must check to be sure. Once you make offcut test it, if wood can separate on glue line joint was weak. If wood breaks joint is strong.


3

What glue suits restoring this old (French?) chair? Take your pick. In addition to there being some personal preference involved naturally, different jobs may require specific adhesives. Although some people — mostly 'armchair theorists' and weekend warriors — insist that only animal-sourced glues should be used to repair antiques1, the simple fact is that ...


3

The top board will expand left to right, but not significantly in the relatively small area of the glue joint itself. The bottom board will expand up and down, but not significantly in thickness. You can do the joint purely with glue if you desire - joints were glued only for a long time. Screws can be added but aren't necessary. Think of them as additional ...


3

There isn't a single definitive answer to this because many of the options have variables that affect the properties of the set/hardened product. Obviously this includes any blends of an adhesive with a wood dust or other powder, but it's also relevant to straight epoxy products and other two-part fillers where there is a separate hardener — in some products ...


2

The usage guidelines given for glues may be conservative (like those provided with finishes tend to be) but you can't have confidence in joints done using a glue below its minimum stated temperature; where strength is important err on the side of caution. It's not like PVAs won't glue at all when it's cold, but strength can be severely compromised as any ...


2

Here are a few ideas that might be helpful regarding your proposed solution from my experience with OSB/wood floors: OSB vs plywood I made good experiences using OSB instead of plywood as it is made from stronger wood and will be more durable. For flooring and subflooring I usually use the type of OSB that comes with tongue and groove. There is no need to ...


2

Hide glue intended for permanent construction (i.e., probably not something like fish or rabbit glue) is strong enough for many applications. It bridges gaps quite well, and rarely discolours the surrounding wood. For a low strength application like mitred picture frames, it'll be more than strong enough. Not as strong as modern PVA glues, certainly, but for ...


2

I just looked at my building code span tables for Glue-Laminated beams (I work at a Architectural/Structural Engineering Firm in Ontario, Canada) and The best options for a 16' beam spanning 14' is 2 - 2x10s which can support 198lbs per linear foot or 3 - 2x10s which can support 298lbs. There is no number on 3 - 2x8s but 2 - 2x8s will only support 84lbs per ...


2

EDIT: I reran the sagulator and found an error in my input (first sentence in italics is in error). The deflection is only 1/4". However, I believe the discussion of the dynamic nature of the loads and the behavior of the end points requiring a secure connection remain important considerations. I just ran this through the Sagulator assuming 200lb ...


2

I'd do the following: Clean the mating surfaces with a cotton swab dipped in isopropyl alcohol or acetone and let dry. It looks like the pendant is made from some sort of dense and potentially oily wood, and you'll need clean surfaces to get a good bond. Clamp the larger piece in a small vice with some padding to protect the part. You want the part held ...


2

More than once have I been confronted with a similar problem. My "go to" solution is to use wood glue with clamping provided by rubber bands. I wouldn't try holding wood glue until it set. You might be able to get away with such an approach if you use super glue, but my attempts at that solution have given me a patch that doesn't last. Before ...


2

After looking at your pictures and seeing what you're after, I think I've got a better idea of what you're doing. If it were me, I'd cut all the box joints first. Your heavy power tools that you'd be using to cut them are far more likely to tear up your nice veneer layer if you were to apply it prior to cutting the joints. Usually veneer is applied last, ...


2

What did woodworkers use other than hide glue before PVA and Epoxy became so prevalent? You might be thinking of casein glue, which is made from milk protein. Casein glues were common in aircraft manufacturing until the start of World War II. This March 2018 newsletter from the Vintage Glider's Club has an excellent overview and cites further reference ...


2

Contact adhesive is generally what you'd use in a home workshop environment to glue high-pressure laminate to any substrate, and it will work here too. The bond may not be super durable, but this is the adhesive of choice for many people today laminating over old Formica and melamine surfaces which are similarly resistant to conventional glues. Surface prep ...


1

After a brief internet search to determine what "phenolic plywood" actually is, I turned up this: Phenolic plywood is somewhat of a misnomer as it should more realistically be called “phenolic faced plywood” or “phenolic covered plywood.” The veneer core plywood itself isn’t made of phenolic; it’s generally made of birch. What makes it “phenolic” ...


1

Are you able to hide any part of the webbing on the edges? If so, I'd just use staples around the perimeter of the webbing. If the entire webbing is meant to be visible, this obviously is not an option. I have seen people use Gorilla Contact Adhesive to use cane webbing over both wood and glass in situations where the entire webbing needs to be visible. It's ...


1

I would like to use TB 3 Ultimate to glue stacks of 4"x4"x8' together in a overlapping configuration to make a 12" tall garden bed. Why do you want to use Titebond 3? It's waterproof and all, but it doesn't fill the gaps that are sure to happen with rough lumber like typical 4x4" stock. You'd be far better off with construction adhesive. ...


1

With it hold up under Pacific NW east cascade weather? Nobody can give you a definitive answer to this as there are too many maybes. If you want to use Titebond III the best advice is to read what Franklin themselves say about its properties on their website and make your own call. If you have any reservations about using it — and I think you should have ...


1

Glue is stronger than lignin in wood, but weaker than wood fibers. If you glue along the grain, the wood will fail before the glue due to the weakness of the lignin in wood, but gluing end grain, the glue will fail before the wood since the wood fibers are massively stronger than glue. To increase strength even more, taper the glued ends so that there's ...


1

If you are sure the parts are epoxied together there isn't much you can do. Epoxy is forever for most mortals. It depends on the kind of epoxy, but most are resistant to most common solvents. So you would have to know the exact kind and hope that you can find the appropriate solvent, and then hope it didn't destroy the material around it. If it is some other ...


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