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1

I'd find the center and make a good accurate divot (~1/2" deep or so). Then find a long drill bit -- at least 12". Clamp 3 or 4 narrow strips of wood to the leg so they come up 6-9" above the top of the leg where you want to drill. You'll be able to hit the divot and visually keep yourself in the middle of the sticks. If this isn't clear, ...


1

It should go without saying that that's not the greatest drawing, but let me go out on a limb. Look at the cleat at the end of the side rail. There appear to be 3 holes which would allow the cleat to be screwed (and glued) into the side rail. There appears to be a hole at the top of the cleat, which to my eye lines up with the upper of 4 holes in the short ...


1

This is clouding from from water vapors in the Lysol getting trapped in under the finish. Sometimes you can take a very lightly alchohol dampened cloth and gently, very gently wipe over the area. Don’t press into the wood and don’t stay in one spot too long. You can also try a heat source like a hair dryer.


3

I ended up using wood glue, the existing screw, and a 6" mending plate across the bottom face of the broken member. The first task was to clean the old glue from the cut face next to the break, which I did using a 1/4" hand chisel and flat rasp. Here is an image before cleaning: Because the overall strength of the repaired member will be ...


4

Is there a way to stop wood from expanding and/or contracting? The main reason that wood changes dimensions is changes in moisture content; generally, it expands a bit in directions perpendicular to the grain direction in more humid summer months and contracts a bit in the same directions in the dryer winter months. There’s very little change in the ...


1

In my experience when I began using dowels, I just bought a long dowel from a big box store and cut them down to size. I began to realize that a 3/8 dowel and a 3/8 drill bit didn't leave any room for glue. When hammering the dowel in it left no room for glue to move up. For this reason I believe you should make scores down the length of your own dowels ...


0

Your question mentions that you only have a circular saw. This makes me question what other tools you might have access to. Be aware, though, that you can make jigs to help you with some tasks. This suggestion would require the following tools: A hammer A bench vise A drill A looooong drill bit A hacksaw or angle grinder with cutting wheel I would suggest ...


5

It looks to be some sort of fabric or material that has long since hardened. Check the chair for markings that could tell you who manufactured the chair. That could help you find other examples that in turn might help you figure out what the groove was for. There were probably a lot of companies that made chairs like yours a century or more ago. Two that ...


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