17

Good, fast, or cheap. Choose any two. Factory methods like pocket holes, screws, and even finger-joints are good enough for mass market construction without having to hire journeymen carpenters. This is how furniture can be made as cheaply as it is. This is just a fact of modern globalism. This is the only way to offer furniture to a global market at scale ...


8

Use a hardwood dowel and PVA wood glue. I mean, you could use hide glue if you want, but don't use epoxy. We want something that is strong and workable like wood. Epoxy will be hard, but it won't be easy to work. And the strength here is about a tight glue joint, not super hard cured glue. We want it to be able to saw, drill, and scrape like wood. In my ...


6

how can I stabilize this without completely ruining the aesthetic of the bench? Assuming that you don't want to fasten it to the floor or install powerful magnets or a massive flywheel, you need to widen the bench's footprint. Often, the legs are splayed outward to accomplish that, but since your bench is already done you might prefer to add a piece under ...


5

It looks to be some sort of fabric or material that has long since hardened. Check the chair for markings that could tell you who manufactured the chair. That could help you find other examples that in turn might help you figure out what the groove was for. There were probably a lot of companies that made chairs like yours a century or more ago. Two that ...


5

Is there a way to stop wood from expanding and/or contracting? The main reason that wood changes dimensions is changes in moisture content; generally, it expands a bit in directions perpendicular to the grain direction in more humid summer months and contracts a bit in the same directions in the dryer winter months. There’s very little change in the ...


5

While it alters the height of the back, a reasonably simple repair would be to cut new tenons on the existing spindles. Commercial tenon cutters exist (for instance, see Lee Valley), but they're an expensive proposition for a one-off repair like this. A bit of work with a knife and a rasp should get you pretty close to a fit. A bit of sanding and you should ...


4

The wood used for slats and other surfaces that touch your bedding should be smooth enough not to catch fabric or raise slivers. It does not have to be finished. If you do finish it you must make sure it is fully cured, and not oil-based, before you use it. (Don't bother finishing it.) A decent planed or scraped surface and rounded or chamfered edges is ...


4

A butt joint is is not very strong and is likely to break if any wood movement occurs. There are many other ways to handle joints like this that will improve their integrity and diminish their appearance. The simple butt joint such as in your photo could be improved first by making sure that the pieces meet square throughout the cross section or better ...


4

In addition to the economic factors @jdv mentioned, there's been a change in social norms over the last few decades: People now move very frequently compared to the past, and those moves are often far away. Some of my furniture is clearly designed to be cleanly disassembled and can then be packed compactly for moving. Woodwork that is assembled using ...


4

It is never a good idea to join shorter boards to create a span to carry any significant loads. Having said that, there will always be situations where the beam may be longer than available material and joining pieces will be a necessary option. The actual layout of the 'beam' pieces is critical. You have not shown the actual arrangement of the boards you ...


4

Bow it up in the center, this should reduce the overall length allowing you to pull it free. Another person or two would help - have a hand at each end of the board, and pull up on the center. Hopefully the board is flexible enough to wiggle out. You may be able to use clamps to substitute people holding onto the board and a clamp in "expansion mode&...


4

Your main issue is the large span for the shelves. Plugging in your dimensions into The Sagulator gives a sag of over 1/4" with pine, a tad under 1/4" with oak and around an inch for particle board or MDF. The easiest way to reduce the sag is to have more support for the shelves. Even a single support in the middle (which reduces the span from 85&...


3

I ended up using wood glue, the existing screw, and a 6" mending plate across the bottom face of the broken member. The first task was to clean the old glue from the cut face next to the break, which I did using a 1/4" hand chisel and flat rasp. Here is an image before cleaning: Because the overall strength of the repaired member will be ...


3

Your design raises some interesting issues and requires additional consideration for connections. Each shelf is supported at only one location and the actual load on each shelf is not the only consideration. The only way I can thin k of to evaluate the design is to actual test the assembly. You may want to make a mockup of a single shelf and test it before ...


3

I think that there is a huge 'it depends' in the question. The dependence is based upon 4 things: The nature of forces on the joint (lateral vs. compression vs. expansion) Time Expectation - The willingness of both you and the 'customer' (whoever it is) to pay for your time. (even if its a spouse, your time in the garage and not with them is worth ...


3

Many monitor stands have the option of mounting with a clamp through a hole in the table as well as a clamp at the edge. This allows the mount to be placed further in from the edge. The hole is not ideal in a table used as a temporary desk, but is penalty fine in a dedicated deal if the monitor arm will be a permanent addition.


3

Dados would be best, since the mechanical part of the joint will carry most of the load. If you go with butt joints and fasteners, I'd suggest pocket screws instead of either nails or screws into end grain. Pocket screws go into the face of the board instead of the end, so they should hold better. In most cases pocket screws are easier to hide, so you get a ...


3

To answer your question, without actual joinery like dovetails or dadoes, I'd recommend glue-and-screw. That is, some mechanical fastener that actually gives those butt-joints some strength. Because, while PVA glue is incredibly good, it is not at its best with all of the joint being 50% end-grain. Many joints like dove-tails, fingers, dadoes, or rabbets ...


3

I'm going to suggest two very different methodologies, both of which won't require the purchase of any new bits or any awkward changes to the setup of your drill press (although the first suggestion does make use of the press). Make a drill guide, use that Essentially follow the technique from this Answer to an old Question here, How do I drill a hole ...


3

If the hand method suggested in the answer from Eli Iser does not work, consider to lightly clamp (with pads) each end to the frame underneath. The purpose of the clamps is not to tightly attach it to the frame but to prevent lifting. Create simple wedge shaped shims from scrap wood with a short taper at the front and an extended flat portion for the ...


3

You can build a desk out of most any wood if you design it well. A desk is more than just the top. Spend some time thinking about and drawing pictures of your desk to make sure it will fit your need and not be wobbly. Poplar and alder have been used successfully to make desks. Here is an example of a desk made of poplar They both take stain well and can be ...


2

That's not rot, it appears to be a small section of 'live edge', i.e. the original surface of the tree, or possibly the former site of a large, irregular knot which is no longer present. Either way it's basically nothing to worry about. Since the wood appears to be maple1 this could also be a bark inclusion2, which is something maples are known for more than ...


2

A complete alternative is what I have right here, which avoids cutting or drilling into your existing table. It's an offcut of 28mm beech kitchen worktop (the cutout for the stove/sink combination in my campervan, tidied up a bit) on kitchen cabinet legs. Worktop and legs are both from Ikea, though the legs are discontinued. The overall height is about ...


2

Mounting a monitor (selected as the heavier of the two) to a stand or arm assembly will change the leverage the mount can place on the foundation. If you consider the monitor directly above the base, the force is vertical and represents, generally speaking, the weight of the monitor and assembly. As the monitor is moved forward, the leverage increases, ...


2

Any real wood (or plywood) top of 1 inch nominal will be more than enough to support the small amount of cantilevered mass you have here. This is true even if it was not attached to the underlying table. Heck, even some of that Ikea foam-core stuff would probably be ok. Your only concern at these dimensions is if the cantilevered mass will want to deform the ...


2

Let's just capture the comments as an Answer. Pull the drawers out and scrape or sand the surfaces (often referred to as "slides") that bear on the carcase (sometimes called "rails") down to bare wood. Do the same for rails, as well. Both of these bearing surfaces should generally be free of any finish. There may be very hard and fast-...


2

An edit with a sketch image was added after i wrote the answer below. As designed in the sketch i would add legs under the half lap joints in the middle. One leg under each joint. Using 2x6 boards laid flat is not a sound plan. They will be much to flexy and will sag significantly. Typically a slat bed has a box frame with a cleat on the inside that the ...


2

Thank you all for your advice. It was very helpful to think about it, especially because I’m planning to do one more. To answer some questions, I have added two pieces of wood that go under the joint and at the end of the counter top, so it became a sturdy one-piece counter top. The board is 5/8” thick. In addition to this, I have a screw under (15 degrees ...


2

Take a look at how wood is used to make load-bearing spans in any construction. For static loads, the idea is to transfer the loads to the floor, and thence to the ground, with minimal deflection (under normal loads) and without danger of sudden catastrophic failure. There are three main ways of achieving this: Use dimensions large enough to resist ...


2

If the core concern in your query is this: I'm looking for the simplest/quickest solution to treat the wood and give it some protection And, if we are to assume that the desk is already finished using some sort of oil, which is suggested in your question, then the most obvious answer is: Don't do anything. Assemble the desk and use it. Unless you ...


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