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In general it's fine to overcoat paints with a clear coat. After all this how cars are painted, with a clear coat as the final layer to protect the paint and ensure the best long-term performance. The paint and clear coat don't need to be of the same type, or "share the same chemistry" as it's often put. You can overcoat with anything that won't cause the ...


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Apply several coats of polyurethane in the recessed areas, using a small brush. It will take you an obscene amount of time because you will have to wait for it to cure between coats. You will need to sand it back some between coats. Then when you are done, you will have to sand some of it to match the surface transition over the gaps. The final result ...


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I have tried using wood cleaner and ring away. Neither one of these was an appropriate product to use as there's finish actually missing. How can I get rid of them? 'Spot refinishing' is what you're looking to do and this is notorious for being tricky to impossible for the amateur to pull off. It's not at all difficult to do, the hard part is in ...


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The thing with finishing is for it to look good you really want it in one coat and without knowing what finish is already applied I would recommend refinishing the top completely. You could just patch it with some new finish but it will stick out like a sore thumb. I would sand back the whole top starting at 60/80 grit and making you way up to 320 grit. ...


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Drying is what you get with brine. The water dries, leaving the salt. It's still salt, just not wet now. Curing is what you get with epoxy. The parts turn into something else entirely. All paints do both. Curing is what makes them not wash away at the first exposure to their own thinner. They do not do both at the same rate. That's why you can have ...


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To me it looks like damage to the finish from sunlight. Red oak seems to do this more often. Not sure why. Maybe sunlight interacts with the tannin's or the pits don't let the finish cure evenly across the surface. Either way, I've seen lots of old red oak furniture that has that wear pattern, and it's much faster to appear on items that have sunlight ...


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You make indoor spaces ant and termite resistant by having an exterminator come into your house and, using the appropriate chemicals in the recommended manner on a recommended schedule, spray wood trim and installed furniture, and places where such pests have ingress to indoor spaces. The idea is to lay down a coating of chemicals where the pests walk or ...


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