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1

I do often prime and do one coat of paint on timber for house construction and then do a final coat after completion. I do this since it's easier to prime and do the first coat before the timber is in place and for outdoor applications it keeps the timber from absorbing moisture and warping. For indoor furniture, the danish-oil treated portions will not ...


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Polyurethane offers the best defense against the elements, but it comes at a price. Polyurethane is literaly clear cover of plastic over the wood. Some people say this gives it a cheap plastic feel and look. Oil naturally effects the color of the wood. Some woods it darkens but some bright woods it brings out the light tones. Whatever effect it may have on ...


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My other option might be to glue a rougher grit paper to a large flat board and use this combined with a lot of elbow grease to smooth it out. If you use the right abrasive and the right strategy this basic idea could work well for you, without it being tons of effort (as hand sanding usually is). You must ensure the abrasive is taut, so it doesn't ruck up ...


2

the exposed surfaces of the jatoba are no longer oxidized I specifically like the oxidized coloring. prevent oxidization in the future. Wood actually darkens primarily due to exposure to light, not air1. Although oxygen may be involved it's misleading to call the colour change oxidation, and it would be more accurate to refer to the colour of older wood as ...


0

Well you are right, epoxy won't take a stain, and a gel stain does not need to be 'absorbed' so has a chance. Paint is even easier and more consistent. I am wondering more what look you are going for here. You talk of filing in cracks in the wood with epoxy but not being able to stain the wood. I'm trying to envision what the current project looks like now ...


1

American Institute of Architects (AIA) sets the standard for commercial woodworking. The standard requires that the finish be balanced whatever is done to one side must be done to the remaining 3. This prevents the wood from moving in unequal ways. Essentially you set up a situation where the grain will behave differently on opposites sides of the wood as ...


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