5

It looks to be some sort of fabric or material that has long since hardened. Check the chair for markings that could tell you who manufactured the chair. That could help you find other examples that in turn might help you figure out what the groove was for. There were probably a lot of companies that made chairs like yours a century or more ago. Two that ...


4

What is the primary advantage of using sealer prior to applying grain filler? The main reason to seal1 is arguably to minimise the over-absorption of the binder in the filler, which can lead to chalking and/or adhesion problems down the line. This isn't an issue with all fillers, but it certainly can be with traditional oil-based pore fillers for example. ...


3

I would like to use the same finish in my project. Unfortunately we have lost any contact with him, so I can't ask him what he used My first thought was that your friend used conversion varnish, a two-component finish. Two-part polyurethane is an order of magnitude more durable than the toughest of 'normal' consumer-level finishes, oil-based polyurethane1, ...


3

Generally speaking, the interior of the cabinet is not finished unless it's on display. So portions behind doors or just open would be finished, but portions hidden behind drawers would not be finished. You may, of course, choose to finish yours, but yes, any contact surfaces will have the finish rubbed off reasonably quickly. If you go take a gander at your ...


3

Sticking with the supplies you have you should be able to rectify this without too much difficulty. One final coat of varnish should do it, with or without a light overall sanding using your 320. If you do sand don't just target the trouble spots, as tempting as that is. And do sand very lightly, using basically no pressure — "just the weight of your ...


3

I'm wondering whether I should apply a finish to the wood. Great question! I think the best place to start is with what other people have done. I did a little searching and found a few examples of old wooden ironing boards on sites like eBay and Pinterest, and a new Amish-made one on Amazon. The new one says the legs are finished but the top is not, "...


3

From my comments, which seems borne out by the last comment from the OP: These fibres look more like crystalline structures than anything organic. Both paraffin and beeswax contain largish crystals. Though, if the wax has been de-oiled or processed in the right manner those crystals can get really small. Just a guess here, but it looks like the conditions ...


3

Billions of chemicals are stored correctly and safely indoors all over the planet. If it does not freeze or get very hot in your area and you can safely lock it up to prevent children or pests from access them then go for it. Temperature is a consideration for some chemicals.


3

What issues could I run into with this? Mainly, you'll run into a not-very-durable finish on the sides and bottom, and possibly a weird transition between the oiled part and the finished part. Water and other liquids will likely seep under the shellac film where the sides meet the top. Water will no doubt contact the sides and bottom of the board and cause ...


3

You are bound to be disappointed by the limitations of a 23g pinner. (Headless or not.) Pins just don't have the holding power. Plus, you're paying a premium to get one that'll handle long (>1-3/8) pins. And they break faster than an 18g gun. 18g, on the other hand, is a workhorse. Baseboard? Yup. Casing? Yup. Holding things in place while the glue sets? ...


2

I find that if I store the unused Danish oil in the same can upright, a skin of cured oil forms on top and makes it hard to use the remainder. This is due to the air trapped in the container after opening. Even if the product doesn't initially it's nearly inevitable that skinning over will happen — unless you're very productive and use up the contents ...


2

This is because when you close the can there is still sufficient oxygen left inside to start the finish curing. Removing the skin will allow you to continue using the finish, but only to a limited extent. Eventually the remaining finish will thicken, as you've seen, and be unusable. There are several ways to get around this, including spraying a non-oxygen ...


2

Let's just capture the comments as an Answer. Pull the drawers out and scrape or sand the surfaces (often referred to as "slides") that bear on the carcase (sometimes called "rails") down to bare wood. Do the same for rails, as well. Both of these bearing surfaces should generally be free of any finish. There may be very hard and fast-...


2

This is perfectly normal with dilute coats of varnish, especially on something like the counter top material you bought where the grain direction, piece to piece, can be (usually is) so varied. In some spots (e.g. around knots) the grain will be nearly at right angles to the surface, and these areas are much more absorbent1 than the majority of the wood, ...


2

You should absolutely not apply mineral oil prior to painting. It will almost certainly interfere with the paint adhering and/or curing.


2

Normally the answer to this is a "we can't say" as already indicated in the Comments, however, with the intended use I think one can say yes in this case. Given that the manufacturers of treated exterior woods like this say that their product is OK for things like garden benches and tables where there is occasional bare-skin contact — bearing in ...


2

I followed @Graphus advice and continued to sand the wood using 80, 150, and 220 grit sandpaper. Thankfully, the spots were almost entirely removed:


2

Unfortunately this is one of those things which comes down to the ever-regrettable it depends. There are numerous variables that are important to any specific situation of sanding epoxy and they go beyond the basic question of high/low speed being better in general. Normally I would have asked what sander you're using (not just the type, but the exact sander ...


2

Let's collect the comments into an answer. The only reasonable answer here is, "no". Short of a waterproof fibreglass or epoxy "shell" on the outside, there is no 100% waterproof finish you can apply to any surface that'll work ideally. Hot tub (or barrel, or ship hull planking) construction depends on a close joint and thicker, clear-...


2

I don’t understand the purpose of applying oil to the pad when French polishing. It's a lubricant. That's it basically. Although there have been deliberate attempts to protect the process and keep it under wraps in the past1 there's no jealously guarded proprietary knowledge protected by a Mason-like secret handshake here ^_^ the oil is just to lubricate ...


2

I have about a month to devote to this project, with an hour or two every few days available. So this is a good-news-up-front deal: that's ample time to do a number of different finishing regimes, and with the fastest of them (see bottom) most of the month can be devoted to just waiting out the cure period after the final coat has gone on. While I'm fine ...


2

A tool handle? Just leave it unfinished, and let your well-earned grime and skin oils polish it over the years. If you do finish it, then choose any penetrating finish and keep it light. The volatiles in the wood will mix with the volatiles in the finish and it will mostly stay the same. Those wax and oil mixtures sold for oiling cutting boards and salad ...


2

You can't. It doesn't matter if you put nothing on it the smell you got was because the wood was being worked and in common with other species that smell lovely during processing — including genuine rosewoods which can have a sort-of rose smell and various resinous conifers which give off that piney/turpentiney odour that some love and some don't — you can ...


1

Yes you can begin to apply oil-based varnish such as polyurethane on top of wood you've applied BLO to. You actually don't need to wait any time at all for the BLO to 'dry', you can begin to apply the varnish immediately without any ill effects1. I've done this many times myself, but I should note that I am conscientious about removing excess BLO from the ...


1

I only did the work less than a month ago so I am surprised that its already wearing down. That's likely why. Varnishes take time to complete the hardening process that converts them into their final cured form. This isn't just after they have dried. Broadly, it takes about a month1. What this means is that after varnishing something ideally one should wait ...


1

Therefore, to get the oil in all of the little grooves I had to really rag and push when I applied. Next time don't be afraid to use a brush for application. The bristles of a brush are far, far better than a wad of cloth at getting finish (even a thin one like "Danish oil") into corners, around details and in fine grooves. I'm 100% sure there's ...


1

Congratualations. You've just discovered that birch is really hard to stain well. It is noted (notorious) for being blotchy. Welcome to the club. As David D has answered, if you want a stained wood surface you're going to have to sand through the stain and get rid of it. There are a couple of approaches to staining blotchy wood. One is to coat the wood with ...


1

Twenty five years ago, I installed something quite similar (not nearly as nice as your piece) and it has lasted just fine until now. This was installed in our larger bathroom which contains both a separate bathtub and shower. Before installation, I applied approx. three coats of clear Watco danish oil. I allowed the finish to dry about 3-4 weeks then applied ...


1

The finer your abrasives are the less material you will be removing. By the time you get to the "polishing" grits you should be removing very little material. If your surfaces were sufficiently flat and smooth to begin with you should be able to safely polish it after 4 coats. In fact, polishing should ideally not even cut through one coat, ...


1

If you used PVA glue to attach your squares to the substrate, you can reheat the glue with an iron to soften/melt it and get the problem squares to adhere to the substrate better. Here's an article about using this method intentionally to make iron-on veneer, and there are some good tips there such as using a piece of kraft paper between the iron and the ...


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