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5

You don't need to repair this. You're using a tusk tenon, so basically everything is going to be held in place by the wedge. With a different style of M&T joint, secured with glue, one could theorise that the reduced glue surface area might be an issue but it's of no relevance here. But even if this were a glued joint I still think it's nothing to ...


4

This blog/ad mentions two wood filler products, one of which can be sanded/trimmed. It's outrageously expensive, but it was the only one I could find. Try adding "polyamide" to your search, as I believe that's the material glue-stick wood filler is usually made from. You might also be able to buy PUR (heat-activated polyurethane hot melt) intended for this ...


3

Now that I've finished sanding, there are quite a few spots that have white splotches from the wood filler That looks like something you get almost always when sanding wood that isn't absolutely perfectly flat — fine sanding dust settled into some minor surface imperfections (they can be incredibly small or shallow and still show this effect). To check if ...


2

Caulk would work well. Anything will work - acrylic, painters, silicone, whatever you have on hand. You can caulk from the outside or from the inside of the enclosure. Your suggestion for duct tape will also work, but will be more prone to deteriorating over time due to the dusty environment. You can also make small wooden splinters to fit in the gaps and ...


2

That wood is in really rough shape and FYI many pros would advise that it doesn't make economic sense to try to fix it up, although it might seem sacrilegious they'd recommend striping out the old and installing new (if necessary having custom millwork done). I don't like to see old wood head to landfill but I would tend to agree if that one area reflects ...


2

If the chunks are small, you can try to fill with some epoxy mixed with sawdust while if the chunks are big or affect a decent portion of a strip of teak, probably the only real solution is to replace the entire strip. As for the appearance, you can try to choose some strips with the color as similar as possible to the old ones, but probably some ...


2

I don't think doing a sawdust + epoxy/shellac/glue filler will sit well with an oil finish Actually they're fine. Fills don't have to absorb the oil in the same way as the surrounding wood, especially very small fills. I hate to recommend it but this is a good candidate for commercial wood filler. If you have one on hand that's a colour you could live I ...


2

Should I look for another way to fill the void? This is a matter of opinion but I don't think so. Epoxy is one of the best, if not the best, materials to fill voids and fallen knots. It has become virtually the default choice for this purpose for this reason. It should be mentioned that a void at the edge of a board does represent a significant weak spot, ...


2

It's a knot. Or at least you are treating it like a knot. Knots don't match final finish color in virtually all cases. The basic approach - fill with black epoxy. Trying to be subtle but it won't match - fill with a dark gray epoxy. Tossing subtle out the door, fill with epoxy and turquoise (or whatever) chips, polish it up & make it (more of) a feature....


1

Melted solid wax as a filler seems like it can provide a good color match and apparently a sufficiently strong/hard surface for a lot of repairs. Yup. And sometimes expedience is king. Because wax fillers are essentially ready to go as soon as they're set they're a very quick option, faster than any putty or other kind of 'wet' filler because there's ...


1

Welcome Ethan. Where splits are linear, I would consider a butterfly or other brace, but when the split is around circular grain, I'm sure it's usable. Worth a try, I suppose. A "butterfly" is a separate piece of wood that crosses the split, glued into a slot you've chiseled into the host. It is an advanced technique, I would say, but if you're up to it, ...


1

The exact species isn't critical but from the centre of the one stair visible it's common softwood, possibly "European redwood" which is another name for Scots pine, pinus silvestris. The dark colour isn't the natural colour of the wood, it's from wood stain or due to age and wear. You can fill holes in just about any wood in three standard ways, using: ...


1

Typical laser engraving places don't have the right equipment for this, but larger custom fabricators with large CNCs will often have a laser head that could do this. That said, it would be fairly expensive. You may prefer to buy a Shaper Origin (like a router with autopilot or autocorrect) and engrave it using a v-bit instead.


1

You may want to consider contacting the Darkly Labs people. Their Kickstarter project for the Emblaser v1 created a laser engraver and low power cutting machine that uses a flat piece of metal for the base. They may be able to give your contact information to an E1 owner in your area. A number of Emblaser v1 owners have made this portion removable, allowing ...


1

Just read over my Answer and TL;DR warning I guess! Will filling cracks with resin visually add or detract? Totally a personal call. Some people don't mind open cracks (somewhat depending on how open they are) while others seem to need any and all cracks. Filling cracks opens up a range of possible decorative choices, from the very common dark brown or ...


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