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13

The bit they are using in that picture has a bearing on the top part that is sticking out of the table (which is actually the bottom of the bit, because routers are inverted in a router table). Bits with bearings like that are safe to operate without a fence, because the bearing spins, acting as a guide as the stock is pushed along the bit. It doesn't matter ...


9

Sure. In the picture above, the bit has a bearing on it, which sort of acts as a fence. I have that exact set of Woodpecker's radius jigs and use them exactly as pictured. I don't know what purpose there would be in using a non-bearing bit on a router table without a fence or some sort of fixture to guide the cut, but you could do it. You will often see ...


6

Yes you absolutely want to treat the ends of fence boards, even if they don't face upwards but especially if they do. Typically you wouldn't use anything different on them, just coat with the same product you use to protect the faces of the boards. However, an additional coat (or two) is advisable since the end grain is very much more absorbent than the ...


4

A box joint might be strong enough but that's just a guess, the loads placed on the finished post will determine if it is or it isn't, along with how accurately it's cut of course. Could be a bit difficult cutting a box joint in situ on a standing fence post accurately enough! Even if for that reason alone you may want to go for something simpler, like a ...


3

Here are some options for repairing your fence: Get a $5 metal T-post or two and drive it in the ground near the broken 4x4. You may have to pound the T-post in at an angle to avoid hitting the concrete. Screw the 4x4 to the metal T-post. Easiest, cheapest, and fastest. This is a good temporary solution to a leaning fence. Temporary brace the fence with 2x4'...


3

The holes are so you can attach a straight longer piece of wood to it.


3

How wide does the "feet" of the fence have to be to keep it from falling over in the wind? There are too many unknown variables to be able to get a definitive answer on how long the "feet" need to be, but if you guestimate the dimensions of the fence in the photo and multiply up to your possible heights it would at least give you a starting point. I'm ...


3

My dad had a crappy old fence on his old table saw. When accuracy was important we used a straight edge, (usually a board) and clamped it to the table. It was a major pain to measure, clamp, and then adjust because we moved it tightening down the clamp. But what I'm getting at is as long as the clamp does not interfere with the path of the wood passed the ...


2

Yes, I think a box-joint would provide sufficient strength, at least if you add the additional foot on top, and not on the bottom where there might be more leverage on the joint, but even there it would probably suffice. I'd cut the fingers on the thin and long side, as most of the strength in the joint will come from the glue, and more, longer fingers will ...


2

As a point of comparison, I operate a router table without a fence or guide roughly half of the time that I use one. For example, if I am making picture frames, I will use a rabbet bit with a guide bearing to rout out the space at the inside-back of the frame where the glass and picture go. If one uses push blocks and keeps one's hands sufficiently far ...


2

It will affect the distance, but you can gain accuracy. Measure and mark is always safer than using the measurements on the gauge.


2

It really depends on how much "good" post you have to work with above the concrete. If you have enough to attach another post to what remains of the original post, you could cut off the original post and join a new one to the "stump" using a lap joint or scarf joint, then run a couple bolts through it to hold together. You should probably orient the joint ...


1

You mean the piece of extruded aluinium? It's just part of the rip fence. It can be used as-is to rip thin boards while giving good access from the right side to make feeding easier. Or you can remove it, spin it 90 degrees clockwise and slot it back in to give you a bigger face with which to register thicker boards for ripping or wider boards for ...


1

Don't try to guess how much wind will force your fence and how wide feet would be needed and how much weights adds to the equation. Instead figure out a way (construction) to adapt (change) the feet (and weights) to what you observe (learn).


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