27

This is an extremely common phenomenon and there's nothing you can do to prevent it entirely. You seem to be well aware of the standard bit of advice going back to the days of slotted screws, that it is vital to press hard to fully engage the driver with the screw. But unfortunately with power driving and Phillips-head screws it is virtually inevitable ...


15

A common solution is to alternate your clamps between top and bottom: Another solution is to clamp boards down across the panel as Drew suggested, although an even better variation on this solution is to use cauls, which start out curved but evenly distribute the pressure across the surface as they are flexed flat against both sides of the panel. Read more ...


14

Very good question. I'll tell you how I use nails, though I'm not sure this is the "correct" answer. When I don't have the patience to wait for the glue to dry. Typically, nailing is only needed to secure two pieces of wood until the wood dries (provided you have long grain to long grain contact). So, I pull out my brad nailer so I can move onto doing ...


11

Unfortunately, the angled tip on Philips bits causes them to climb and slip, and round over their edges and/or strip the head of the screw. Often if you buy a pack of screwdriver bits for your drill, it will come with lots of #2 Philips bits because everyone knows that perhaps the most ubiquitous head and size, and at the same time it is very prone to ...


11

I always clamp jointed boards with some good, straight hardwood boards across their faces. This way, you'll use long clamps across the face of the jointed boards to keep your joints together, and shorter clamps to clamp your truing boards to the face. Use a pair of boards with the work piece between them. When it sets up, it should not be bowed at all.


10

It seems to be a swing hook with bearing or swing hangers.


9

Another thing that might help: although the brand of goldscrews that I use are described as being waxed/lubricated, for demanding jobs, or to max out cordless runtime, I use a smear of petroleum jelly or wax which eases insertion. I keep an old candle stub for this purpose. I feel that p. jelly is a better lubricant but a bit less convenient. It also gives ...


9

This used to actually be a guild issue, believe it or not. "Mere" carpenters were forbidden to use many of the fancier joinery available to furniture makers, and expected to use nails. Hence the association of nails with cheaper pieces made by less-skilled labor. Of course the budget piece might be just as functional as the fancier one -- and the fact that ...


8

Pretty much anyplace you'd use sheet aluminum outside. Think roofing and home exterior finish work... they are used to attach the aluminum trim used to surround the roof, or on a home with aluminum siding with trim around windows. I think I've seen them in screen door frame construction as well. 3" screws would be perfect for making frames from extruded ...


8

One major issue you should take into account is the weight being supported by the fastner. Most manufacturers will publish weight/load tables for their fastners, such as Quik Drive's table. That gives the various strengths of the fastner. You should then calculate how much strength you need - for example, you have a deck that is going to be big enough for ...


7

Hammer drills are designed for working with masonry. Since you're driving the screws into lumber, you really don't need the hammer action for this job. Switch to a standard drill (or, if your hammer drill allows you to disengage the hammer action, do that) and lower the clutch setting to the lowest value that will get the screw head down to the wood surface. ...


6

Are there any other hardware options besides two rods bolted to the wood top and wood base? There are many types of bolts that might suit a project like this, depending on the exact design you arrive at. Have a look on BoltDepot for a pretty comprehensive overview of what's available. In theory the entire table could be made from wood, using a hardwood ...


6

Posidriv is a big improvement on Philips. No experience of the others. In the UK I think Posidriv is the most common for construction, with Torx etc for specialist applications. I use Wera Diamond bi-torsion bits - last longer than others I've tried. (Their blurb: "Bi-Torsion screwdriver bit , BDC series diamond coated. Colour banded for identification. The ...


6

That's a threaded insert, specifically a tee-nut with spurs. It is designed to be inserted from the opposite side of a drilled hole and accept a bolt; the spurs dig in to keep it from spinning as the bolt is tightened. Threaded inserts are sometimes used for strength, but more often are used where a connection may be assembled and disassembled (or tightened ...


6

Don't cut the chain. Either use a repair link/coupling, or slip it on the eye. If you spread the eye, it won't come back tight, as it will spring away from the point of contact. The secret to keeping it tight is to twist the eye open - use a lever/rod/wrench to move the free end away from the shank (sideways), then slip on the chain, then twist the free end ...


5

The above answers are correct in that there are better screw head types to use. Pozidriv seems really common here in the UK and they do seem to be significantly less prone to destroying both the bit and the screws. I would also recommend though that the quality of the bit makes a difference. The best ones I've found for Pozidriv bits are Wera gold They do ...


5

What type of fastener would be best to join the panels to each other where a permanent connection is needed, keeping in mind that it 3/4 plywood joined end to end, the angles are slight, and no fasteners can be visible? For this, I would consider a splined joint. The image below shows two boards that are coplanar, which is pretty easy to set up and execute....


5

The answer depends on how much wood you need the screw to go through in the stock that you drill the hole in, plus how deep you want it to penetrate into the receiving stock. There's no single answer to give, but here's a big chart from Kreg that breaks down different common scenarios and the suggested screw length: Image credit: Kreg Tool Company


4

What type of fastener would be best to join the panels to each other where a permanent connection is needed, keeping in mind that it 3/4 plywood joined end to end, the angles are slight, and no fasteners can be visible? I Googled "blind hinges" and found some nice examples fromTectus and from ibmhCorp which could work nicely for the middle joints. I am not ...


4

Are there any other easier and cost effective options for mounting a 2x6 to concrete? Tapcon screws will be your easiest and cheapest means to mount a 2x6 to a concrete floor, by far. They will require a hammer drill to drill the holes in the concrete, but you can rent one from the store if you don't have one. You could also use concrete expansion anchors ...


4

Specifically, I am wondering about how to determine where those fasteners are located in the joint and how many are needed in total. As far as I'm aware, there are no real guidelines or rules of thumb for this sort of thing besides "make it look right to your eye." I understand that this is possibly the vaguest of ways to put it, but that's really how it ...


4

I suppose there is more than one way to do this, but I'd be strongly inclined to spread the eye-bolt slightly, fit in the twist-link chain, and the squeeze the eye bolt head closed again. To do the spreading, I would use whatever comes to hand to act as a wedge. Maybe a bolt or bit of round steel rod to fill most of the space and then driving an old ...


4

If you must bolt it on You could make your life a lot easier and just use through-bolts. No fitting of nuts or anything, just drill clearance holes, thread bolts through and tighten a nut on the projecting end (on top or underneath, it doesn't matter). It's really little more hassle than bolting into threading for periodic use as you only need two bolts (...


3

I'm not sure if this is cheaper in the long term but consider using adhesive, it's certainly the easiest option since you just apply, press the board into position and wait for the glue to cure. Construction adhesive and epoxy are both viable here, as long as the concrete surface is in good condition, not friable and dust-free. With epoxy in particular you ...


3

If you have a hammer drill, then use tapcon. If you don't, then you're going to have to buy or rent tools anyway, and the decision isn't clear. Cost is largely a wash if you don't already have the appropriate tools for one or the other. Time is different, though. Drilling holes and then screwing in screws is much more time consuming than simply shooting a ...


3

I have come to the conclusion that the hardware you are looking for is not proprietary but not easily accessible to the general public as of yet. Even if it is it is definitely not widely marketed as someone would have found it by now. My wife told me I have been looking at too many beach chairs so I have at least some credibility when it comes to this ...


3

No one has mentioned your jointer technique. If the jointer fence is not perfectly 90° then any small deviation get multiplied by the number of boards you have and you get a curve. The solution to this is NOT to try to get your jointer fence exactly 90° (although close is good). Instead, lay out your boards how you want them to be glued up, and draw a ...


3

As mentioned in other answers, nails may be more appropriate when the wood will be prone to a lot of warping or swelling. Nailed joints offer flexibility to accommodate the changing dimensions of the joint, whereas glue joints may outright fail. Moisture is a major cause of warping and swelling. Projects that are subject to sustained contact with water, ...


3

Others have alluded to this, but I'm making it obvious. Are you using posidrive screws with a plain philips bit? This is a combination that will cam out easier. Try holding the bit and a sample screw, fit them together like you're going to drive the screw. There should be a good firm fitting between the two. Any slop or tolerance that you can feel is ...


3

You are correct to worry about wood movement. A solid wood top it will move along it's width (in this case from the front to the back of the desk) with seasonal humidity changes. Particleboard is a stable material due to the amount of binder in it (i.e. glue) and the lack of an organized grain. If you secure the top to the particle board without allowing ...


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