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7

I think I may have screwed up the order of operations a bit Yup. But because you're using an oil finish it's not quite as bad as it seems. Inside the cracks and other defects the epoxy won't stick as well as it would to bare wood, however once cured drying oils aren't oils any longer so the bond won't be as terrible as one might expect. Long wait for the ...


5

I've just checked the website for this epoxy. The pot life is not the same as the curing time. It states: Potlife: 30 minutes at 23 ° C Curing time: Initial curing 10-12 hours at 23°C. Full cure after 7 days. So there is nothing wrong here!


4

the white haze stayed all the way through 180 grit. 180 paper is actually fairly coarse in the grand scheme of things. It is a perfectly fine final sanding grit for wood in most cases (and sometimes you can get away with stopping below this) but for other materials it's quite common to sand far beyond 180-220 grit because the scratches left by paper of this ...


4

Trying to recall my grade 11 chemistry here, but the makeup of the two parts are not identical and one has molecules that fit in the empty spaces of the other part. You can observe the same behaviour with other liquids like mixing water and alcohol. Or an easier to visualize example is imagine pouring sand into a container filled with large marbles. The ...


4

Since it doesn't relate to the other things we're discussing in the Comments we can go ahead and Answer the main query you posted here. In which order should I glue, stain and apply epoxy resin? The normal construction order would be: assemble — glue together in this case do any filling that's needed — epoxy in this case and then stain if you're ...


3

Why is clear epoxy not used? Two related reasons I can think of plus a third unrelated. The first is just because people don't want to make their fills transparent (or to put it another way, they really like coloured fills), at a guess this would account for most of it. The related reason is that maybe some users know getting the fill completely bubble-...


3

You will need to experiment. Try ten small batches with increasing amounts of hardener. Check results and repeat based on previous results and go from there. I would look for another product while doing this, though.


2

Should I look for another way to fill the void? This is a matter of opinion but I don't think so. Epoxy is one of the best, if not the best, materials to fill voids and fallen knots. It has become virtually the default choice for this purpose for this reason. It should be mentioned that a void at the edge of a board does represent a significant weak spot, ...


2

It's a knot. Or at least you are treating it like a knot. Knots don't match final finish color in virtually all cases. The basic approach - fill with black epoxy. Trying to be subtle but it won't match - fill with a dark gray epoxy. Tossing subtle out the door, fill with epoxy and turquoise (or whatever) chips, polish it up & make it (more of) a feature....


2

When you apply the poly the scratches will fill and the cloudiness from the sanding will disappear


2

I am wondering if it would be possible to dye black gorilla glue and use it to fill cracks in wood instead of the well known black epoxy method? No. Polyurethane glues foam up as they cure, and the foam isn't particularly strong. If you try to use it to fill cracks, you won't get the hard, solid surface that you get with epoxy, but instead a crappy, brittle ...


2

Basically, I want to avoid situations I've encountered in the past where the dyed epoxy seeps into the wood surrounding the void and creates a stain or blotch that is difficult to impossible to sand out. I've experienced this with boards that exhibit spongy or lightly-rotted areas around the void I'm filling. The part I've bolded is the main issue here, ...


2

You need to consider what effect you're chasing. Epoxy as a filler always looks 'foreign' because it has a different surface finish, and because it neither takes stains nor ages the same way as the surrounding timber. So it will always show. If you can't hide it, flaunt it. Which is to say, use a contrasting colour(color) If you're wanting to make an ...


1

I've used clear epoxy and tinted, it just depends on the project. Clear is generally harder to get right. If you have contaminants they will show or cloud the final product. For me, tinting is either with black or very dark brown, no matter the wood color. I do that so that it does not look like I was trying to match the wood, which would be really tough ...


1

Because epoxy is a high build film finish, you want the surface to be flat and level before you put something else on it. So that means either sanding the surface flat or pouring another layer of epoxy to cover the missed spots and the rest of the surface. Epoxy will achieve a high sheen if you sand to high grits, likely wet sanding as you get into the ...


1

I have used hot glue on occasion to form a “dam” around the perimeter of the resin. Simple and effective. Hot glue guns and sticks are very cheap. Easy to remove later.


1

Obviously levelling the slab to begin with would help here, checking in both directions and along both diagonals with a level1. but this time I think a little silicone/hot glue boundary might keep the epoxy from running over again You want to be very careful using anything containing silicone around woodworking. Silicone contamination is notoriously ...


1

What sort of machine or tool would I use to cut them all down flat to be even with each other? First check your wall is flat, many are not. I'd use a ruler that is longer than the longest dimension of the artwork and place it edgewise (not flat) against the wall in many horizontal, vertical and diagonal orientations. Many walls are not flat. Do the dowels ...


1

The only way I can see to do it is to thicken the epoxy with something like colloidal thickening silica, but every thikener shoul work reasonabily well, until it is thick as a filler and then apply it with a spatula in a thin layer, wait until the epoxy is almost cured and then apply another layer (for the workability time refer to the resin manufacturer ...


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