9

I am wondering (assuming I have my choice of plugin's in a shop) is one better than the other. It all comes down to wattage. P = IR; i.e., Power (Watts) = Amps * Voltage. If a given tool draws 14A on a 120V circuit, the same tool will draw 7A on a 240V circuit. The more amps you send through a wire, the thicker (higher gauge) the wire you need, as touched ...


8

In general, the designation 220 VAC (volts alternating current) is a nominal value. The actual value is in a range, depending on your utility, your distance from the transformer that serves your house, and other factors including time of day and nearby loads. The short story is that your nominally 220 VAC outlets will work just fine with a motor rated for ...


5

220V devices run at lower currents since voltage and current are inversely related, and as such, require smaller conductors. Smaller conductors in wire is cheaper, so installing a circuit to support 240V/15amp is cheaper than 120V/30amp. There are efficiency improvements in motors when running at 240V, and even more so in running 3-phase power. 3 phase ...


5

Being an old fogey, I have a lot of experience with 110 vs. 220 in a shop environment, both commercial and personal. My primary tool for years (early 60's on) was a radial arm (all 10" Craftsman's, my current one is circa 1958). Having run it on both 110 and 220, the biggest difference is power recovery. Not only is the start-up much faster, but any cut's ...


4

From fine woodworking, you have a few options for running 3 phase equipment when your power lines are single phase. Here's a brief summary: If the manufacturer is still in business, see if they have a single phase motor you can purchase Purchase a phase converter. This may be static, rotary, or electronic. (Also see the note about Variable Frequency ...


4

Thete are lots of lamps out there with wooden bases with various finishes.If the wiring isn't bad, and the socket is approved for use in contact with wood (most are, if mounted correctly) and you let there be enough airflow around the bulb for it to cool itself, this really shouldn't be a problem.


3

This question about voltage gets asked a lot. Going to 240 V does not change the power drawn by the saw. It might change the power to the blade, which is very different. In my case I have a 2 hp General TS that was wired for 110. I had it plugged into 110 but the 15 amp wiring in my shop really could not handle it. So... I was going to have to pay for a new ...


2

You can do it with a phase converter. Basically there are rotary and static phase converters that can convert single phase 220 into three phase. Rotary converters are a solid technology that has been in use since the 1960's. you can operate multiple 3 phase machines off of a single rotary converter. Static phase converters basically allow 3 phase motors ...


1

Power to the blade has to do with motor efficiency. Motors are carefully designed to be efficient as possible. But, if you start asking for more amps than your circuit can provide, the voltage to the motor drops below the design point, efficiency goes down, and power to the blade drops. This can result in stalling ( very bad for the motor ) or breakers ...


1

Large semi-industrial machines usually use large semi-industrial motors, and there's a large market for them. Get as much information as you can off the current motor, then find a large motor supply & repair place in the semi-industrial part of town (it's the area with the large city blocks). This will be a not-quite daily request, and they could very ...


1

I run a 3 phase CNC Lathe in my garage, I use an American Rotary 10 HP phase converter. Install was very straightforward quiet and runs great. I am not sure why but the manufacturer of the lathe requested the use of a RPC and not VFD. My Lathe is 5hp and I was instructed to use 20amp at utility box. Here is a video I took when I first installed it. 3 phase ...


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