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I was looking for a thin 2mm drill bit. When I asked a manufacturer why their thinnest drill bit was 3mm, they said because drill bits are fragile if you make them too thin. To me 2mm isn't actually very thin. I commonly drill holes smaller than this and both of the HSS bit sets that I own (bought many years apart) go down to 1.5mm. And twist drills much ...


4

Most US drill indexes go down to 1/16" (1.5875mm). It is best to keep the RPM's high and the feed speed low with those and smaller bits. The use of a drill press is highly recommended. Most smaller drill bits will be intended for working with metal, but will work fine in wood. Wear safety glasses (always in the shop), and expect to break a few. Most ...


4

It seems that your pieces of wood have shifted somewhat since you started drilling. If you can eyeball the 3 pieces to see which one(s) seem out of line, use one or more clamps to persuade the wayward one back into position. Once you have lined them back up, you should be able to get the bit out and, without removing the clamps, drive your dowel into the ...


4

I'm going to suggest two very different methodologies, both of which won't require the purchase of any new bits or any awkward changes to the setup of your drill press (although the first suggestion does make use of the press). Make a drill guide, use that Essentially follow the technique from this Answer to an old Question here, How do I drill a hole ...


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Aha! (and I'm glad to see I wasn't the only one who was mystified): https://www.reddit.com/r/whatisthisthing/comments/cw2pqv/what_are_those_plastic_things_in_my_drill_bits_set/ (they're for holding flat-head screws in place whilst you start screwing, so associated with the screw-bits, rather than the drill-bits)


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Thanks for the comments and suggestions all. I fed some linseed oil down the auger bit and using an adjustable spanner (with a long handle for leverage) was able to turn the bit anticlockwise. The more I turned, the easier it became thanks to the oil. I reattached the drill and whilst activating the drill, and was able to pull the bit free from the jam and ...


2

I'd find the center and make a good accurate divot (~1/2" deep or so). Then find a long drill bit -- at least 12". Clamp 3 or 4 narrow strips of wood to the leg so they come up 6-9" above the top of the leg where you want to drill. You'll be able to hit the divot and visually keep yourself in the middle of the sticks. If this isn't clear, ...


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I'm not sure if the wood working SE is the place to post this question, but ill give you my experience. The best way to deal with this is hands down get your hands on a drill press. That being said there are motor controllers that you can buy that can change the speed of your motor using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM). The problem you may run into though, is ...


2

If I had to do this and didn't have cnc access, I'd make a drilling template that indexed on the previous hole, so even if it was slightly inaccurate, it would be consistent. I'll try and sketch a 3d version later today, but it's a chunk of plywood with an index pin, a drilling hole, and a center hole. Critical aspects: the index pin (dowel) has to come out ...


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The claims are ridiculous. In electronics, much smaller holes are drilled in circuit boards, automatically by CNC machines in production. I have a set of drill bits for that purpose which includes drills 25 mils (0.025") and narrower. These are used in certain hobbies also, like jewelry making and whatnot.


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That type of constructions lends itself to a CNC router, in order to get the precision required, but a DIY approach isn't completely impossible. Consider to create a graphic image using a vector editor such as Inkscape (free, multi-platform) or Illustrator or CorelDraw (both pay) to represent the holes of the join. Ensure that your graphic also includes a ...


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Place the dowel on a flat surface. Place a piece of wood on the flat surface whose thickness is roughly that of the dowel radius. Snug this up to the end of the dowel. Draw a line on the end of the dowel using the piece as a guide. Roll the dowel a little. Mark another line. Repeat until you have 5 or 6 lines. The lines should form a little circle (OK, ...


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