6

It sounds like you're running your bit too slowly. Spade bits are pretty sensitive to low speeds. A faster speed (and less feed pressure) will result in less material being removed with each pass. This, in turn leads to less force on the wood, resulting in less tearing of the fibers. This tearing of the fibers, instead of cleanly cutting them, is what ...


4

There are drill guides and drill blocks available for making repeatable holes in stock. The usual suspects like Wolfcraft and Milescraft offer these, for example. Whether you use a block-style guide (either DIY or store-bought) or a fancy guide depends a lot on what tool you will be using. For example, a block is not going to help you if you are using a ...


3

I would spend the time making a pattern drill guide out of 3/4" plywood. Size of guide would be 24 in wide, and 18"-24" high. Start by drilling the holes 5 cm from the edge. The next set of holes are 10 cm on center. This allows you to align the pattern guide to the edge where the drilling ended. You can use one of the drill attachment described in the ...


3

I'm going to suggest two very different methodologies, both of which won't require the purchase of any new bits or any awkward changes to the setup of your drill press (although the first suggestion does make use of the press). Make a drill guide, use that Essentially follow the technique from this Answer to an old Question here, How do I drill a hole ...


3

Optimal drill speed involves maximizing how fast you can drill through a substance while getting a smooth hole and not damaging the drill bit by over heating. The correct speed will allow the drill bit to cut the material without getting too hot. Too slow will "chew" or tear the material. Too fast will cause excessive heat. Spade bits are ...


2

A forstner bit may have a shorter point, but for such a small diameter, it's not a certainty. It's likely from your description that you're using a hand drill, which makes precision holes just a bit more difficult than a drill press. It could be considered heresy but I will occasionally use a milling bit in my milling machine to create a flat bottom hole in ...


2

I'm not sure if the wood working SE is the place to post this question, but ill give you my experience. The best way to deal with this is hands down get your hands on a drill press. That being said there are motor controllers that you can buy that can change the speed of your motor using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM). The problem you may run into though, is ...


2

While I would just chuck the thing and buy a new toilet seat, you seem to be attached to it so... I'd suggest a non-woodworking solution: Find a maker space type of location near you and see if someone will help you recreate the part on a 3D printer. Offering some cash for their time and material may go a long way toward motivating a helper. As a woodworking ...


1

I'd find the center and make a good accurate divot (~1/2" deep or so). Then find a long drill bit -- at least 12". Clamp 3 or 4 narrow strips of wood to the leg so they come up 6-9" above the top of the leg where you want to drill. You'll be able to hit the divot and visually keep yourself in the middle of the sticks. If this isn't clear, ...


1

I don't know. All those while geometrically correct depend at some point on some one visual judgement like getting your right angle perfectly bisected how to do that? Or drawling the two lines that bisect same amount circle? I would make a circle 2" on paper with end dowel or compass, cut out circle, fold in half then half again center fold= center, ...


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