3

If you grind off the tip you'll want to use a guide block to make sure the bit doesn't wander when you're starting the hole. To make a guide block just drill a hole the same size through another piece of wood and line it up with where you want your hole to be. Clamp it to the work piece and your drill bit won't wander. This is also useful if you want to ...


2

A "typical" design for forstner bits is one where the brad point is no deeper than (and often even with) the cutting edges, which means they are suitable for creating flat-bottom holes or insets. That is, the point on many traditional forstner bits should be no longer than the cutting edges. Removing the point will cause it to wander unless you are really ...


2

A forstner bit may have a shorter point, but for such a small diameter, it's not a certainty. It's likely from your description that you're using a hand drill, which makes precision holes just a bit more difficult than a drill press. It could be considered heresy but I will occasionally use a milling bit in my milling machine to create a flat bottom hole in ...


1

It sounds as if drilling the holes for the screws as well as making the screws work at all, may be more effort for you than it's worth. You definitely aren't going to make this work by buying a router bit for your drill. You said you thought glue might be strong enough (and many types would be extremely strong) but you're worried about possible future ...


1

I believe the reason for a non round countersink is the number of flutes/blades on the bit. With an odd number, if you can imagine it, a blade on one side is cutting whilst there is no cutting blade on the opposite side and therefore no even support for the bit. This will cause the bit to wander according to the amount of support it is receiving. I ...


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