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10

One definition of a lumber crayon: Extruded lumber crayons last up to 10 times longer than ordinary molded wax crayons. Fade-proof, water-proof, smear-proof. Won’t melt in direct sunlight. Will work on wet (green) lumber or dry wood, metal, concrete and most other surfaces (source) Let's break this down: You can smear your standard crayon - that makes '...


8

bowlturner's answer is correct, and will probably give you the results you are looking for. But it inspired me to experiment, mostly to see how sharp an edge I could get. Hardwood Guide As you can see, just setting down a piece of hardwood makes an obvious, if not sharp, line. The main problem is getting into the corner. I tried to only scorch the pine, so ...


5

I am assuming you are using the torch to 'scorch' the wood and not really burn it. I think that clamping another piece of wood as a "sacrificial piece" onto the line should work just fine. Doing this light enough and you can reuse the one board over and over again. if it is getting to burnt than run it through the jointer to square it up again. Using a ...


4

I'd say that CAD is not necessarily your best option. Don't get me wrong. CAD is a great thing and learning any CAD software will be a very handy thing to have up your sleeve. I highly recommend learning any CAD software (no matter how limited or advanced) However, there are a few problems: I have not done woodworking much before Think of CAD software ...


4

Most woodworkers who do CAD-like renderings these days are using SketchUp; the free version is pretty decent and lots of online tutorials exist. This is an observation, not a recommendation.


4

Here's a neat method I found on woodgears.ca: Let A and B be the endpoints of your circular arc, and let M be the midpoint between A and B. If P is the highest point on your arc (the apogee), then let h be the distance from M to P. Finally, let L be the distance between A and B: Note: Considering the triangle formed by the center point, point M, and point ...


4

I've collected a few solutions online, and a website to help with some of the steps: Pin a bent stick (or lath) on three points (e.g. center and extremities), and draw its outline. It might not be perfectly circular, but you'll be able to adjust the curve. For best results, you would have to select the stick/lath carefully for straight grain and no knots. ...


1

I'm going to go with Sketch up. One it's free and two if you use it a lot and need more options there is an awesome paid version for anything you would need to do. Also there is a site woodgrears from a guy Mathias Wendel who designed something called Big Print program which is just what your looking for. Able to print stuff to scale them glue it to your ...


1

Although this approach does not necessarily involve software, it can be helpful: prototype your designs by making full-size or scale models using cardboard or XPS foam (the pink or blue 4'x8' sheets of insulation foam sold at home improvement centers). Foam is easy to work with, cheaper than lumber, and you can even prototype complex joinery.


1

If you only need to present a darker wood, but not charred or completely black, aluminum foil or aluminum tape should work well. Aluminum is great because it conducts heat very well, spreading the heat harmlessly across a larger surface of metal. wide aluminum tape should give you a very sharp line without the problems that the corners of higher templates ...


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