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20

A good go-to solution is wax. Either some paste wax, or in a pinch you could rub a candle on it. I've also rubbed a bar of soap on wooden drawer slides in the past, though I'm sure there are plenty of reasons not to use soap.


10

candle wax as mentioned in the other answer. Otherwise glue some hardwood strips on the surface. Hardwood doesn't wear as fast as softer woods and be able to provide a smoother surface. There are some low-friction tapes you can stick to one or both of the surfaces.


8

Another alternative -- modern upgrade from wax -- would be "ultrahigh molecular weight" (UHMW) plastic, such as teflon. This is available in a number of forms, one of which is thin self adhesive tape. It doesn't look as traditional as wax, of course, but ir it's on the underside of the drawer anyone who notices it will also know why it's there, so...


7

I can think of a few solutions to this problem but I'm not sure how palatable any one of them will be to you or to the owner of the chest given the age of the piece. I'm afraid I also have no idea how any of them might affect value as the furniture market is full of arbitrary standards on what is OK to do to old pieces and what is not. New bottoms The ...


5

I wouldn't recommend trying to improvise with the wrong style of slide, because it will take longer, is likely to be more frustrating, and may not work as well in the end. That said, you do have some options: Buy a replacement part from the original manufacturer of the bed. If the originals failed prematurely, you may be entitled to free replacement parts. ...


5

The retracting control console may be a lot simpler than it looks. For example, you could simply route some diagonal grooves in the sides and insert (stainless steel) dowels into the side edges of the console top, near the rear. The dowels follow the diagonal grooves in the sides, so when you pull out the console, the controls are raised and when you push ...


4

I'd say that CAD is not necessarily your best option. Don't get me wrong. CAD is a great thing and learning any CAD software will be a very handy thing to have up your sleeve. I highly recommend learning any CAD software (no matter how limited or advanced) However, there are a few problems: I have not done woodworking much before Think of CAD software ...


4

Most woodworkers who do CAD-like renderings these days are using SketchUp; the free version is pretty decent and lots of online tutorials exist. This is an observation, not a recommendation.


4

You haven't significantly compromised strength by removing the last pin and the back of a drawer actually doesn't need to be that strong1 so I don't think it's a big concern. But obviously it is best not to lose a part of a joint (even if only so the effort to make it isn't wasted!) so I'll list some options for you. Sticking with the Blums For future ...


3

It seems that the handles are stuck to the finish on the front of the drawers. They could have been installed before the finish cured or just the force from being tightly attached has somewhat bonded the pulls to the finished surface of the drawer fronts. Years of furniture polish and residue, etc. could play a part in this too, I'd imagine. You might need ...


3

Generally speaking, the interior of the cabinet is not finished unless it's on display. So portions behind doors or just open would be finished, but portions hidden behind drawers would not be finished. You may, of course, choose to finish yours, but yes, any contact surfaces will have the finish rubbed off reasonably quickly. If you go take a gander at your ...


3

Bottoms are planned to be made from 3mm thick hardboard. This is the part you should probably change. If you make the bottoms from something much stouter it will self-support. You could go up to 6mm hardboard, which is significantly stiffer than 3mm, but something like 12mm particleboard/chipboard or plywood would be the superior choice. 12mm and even 18mm ...


2

Let's just capture the comments as an Answer. Pull the drawers out and scrape or sand the surfaces (often referred to as "slides") that bear on the carcase (sometimes called "rails") down to bare wood. Do the same for rails, as well. Both of these bearing surfaces should generally be free of any finish. There may be very hard and fast-...


2

I'd like to keep using this style of slides on the rest of my drawers. Are those slides just incompatible with dovetails, or is there some trick so that I don't end up with a missing pins? I can think of a few solutions, but if you want to keep using dovetails for that rear joint, the simplest solution is surely to just change the spacing of the pins and ...


1

Nothing is stopping you from making a false front the full height of the drawer and reinforcing the connection between the false front and the body of the drawer. This was the connection between the real front and the false front isn't stressed (so you can use short screws from the back) while the stressed part of the false front and the body of the drawer ...


1

I see the ovals on the bottom - I presume these represent the holes from the pocket screw jig to allow it to attach to the back. I presume that there will be similar holes in the bottom going into the short side closest to us, and the tall side further away? So long as the pocket-screw locations don't interfere with the drawer slide mounting screw locations, ...


1

It depends on the specific drawer slide. Some are designed to be mounted at the bottom, some elsewhere. Follow the instructions of your specific slides.


1

I'm going to go with Sketch up. One it's free and two if you use it a lot and need more options there is an awesome paid version for anything you would need to do. Also there is a site woodgrears from a guy Mathias Wendel who designed something called Big Print program which is just what your looking for. Able to print stuff to scale them glue it to your ...


1

Although this approach does not necessarily involve software, it can be helpful: prototype your designs by making full-size or scale models using cardboard or XPS foam (the pink or blue 4'x8' sheets of insulation foam sold at home improvement centers). Foam is easy to work with, cheaper than lumber, and you can even prototype complex joinery.


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