Hot answers tagged

14

LeeG's method of using a router table is good though you can add finger boards. After getting the blanks nearly round with the router you can jig up a chisel in a block of wood so it ends up looking a bit like a pencil sharpener. Then with a hand-drill you can rotate the blank against the chisel so it ends up truly round. This article describes the full ...


12

Three methods I know of. First is a dowel plate. You trim your wood to approximate size and use a mallet to pound it through smaller and smaller holes until it is the size you want. You can also use a round over bit in a table mounted router. Leave the ends square (to run along the fence), and pass all 4 corners across the appropriate sized round over ...


10

You can buy what you need already fabricated. Search "champfer strip". Here's a Home Depot link: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Alexandria-Moulding-3-4-in-x-3-4-in-Pine-Chamfer-Strip-Moulding-0W995-200RLC/206844349 If the 3/4" x 3/4" is too fat, here's a link to 1/2": https://www.patterson-online.com/itemdetail/WC1210 I'm sure you can find other options as well ...


9

I've made several wands on my lathe and it works just fine. I've gotten them down to close to a 1/4" thickness. However, there is vibration and chatter that happens so, you have a couple options. One includes spending money, getting a steady rest makes it SO easy that if you are going to do a bunch it might be worth it, there are even plans for making ...


8

Belt Sander This seems like an obvious choice. It might not make perfect corners on the new dowel but I can't imagine people will be looking up at where this meets. Very easy to remove stock quickly and if you orient the dowel right you should be able to get nice flat surfaces. Other power sanders could work for this as well just maybe not an orbital one as ...


8

The hole in the pictured jig should have the same diameter as the diagonal measurement of the square stock that's to be made into a dowel. If you're feeding round stock through to make a smaller diameter dowel, just make the hole the same diameter as your stock. If you can't get the stock to turn easily, you may need a slightly larger hole. The height ...


8

I have tried several methods. I'll list them below and comment: Using Mattias Wandel's "pencil sharpener" method. This works moderately well but I found that the dowels had spiral grooves in them. Also, the wood broke over time, so I got sick of it. Using a router table: This didn't work at all for me. There was too much force required to push the ...


8

That style of dowel would be difficult to emulate. Not so much actually! You can do a decent job of simulating this texture by simply gripping the dowel in pliers, vice-grips etc. and drawing it through, or squeezing hard to compress them into the wood. Here's that tip in an old issue of Popular Mechanics, with another technique underneath: [Source: ...


7

While you can sand dowels to reduce their diameter it's not the most efficient method even to take off just a millimetre or two, and it's difficult to ensure consistency along the length. Especially since you want to remove as much as 5mm I think you'd be much better of using a cutting rather than a sanding operation, following the rule shavings > dust where ...


6

The main reason for for the grooves in the pegs is to increase the surface area for the glue to adhere to. You get a lot more surface area, which gives more bonding strength. My dowels have straight lines. Cutting long dowels down to peg size is fine as well. It partially depends on how much strength you need and you can often add in an extra dowel to ...


6

Forget squaring round dowels. If you want one side round for looks, it's much easier to round a square than vise-versa. Go to any lumber yard or big box store and find a 1" x 4" x 6' (or 1" x 6" x 6', etc.) standard board. Standard is the name of a type of board. It is usually harder than similar common boards. Some people will say you need a cedar ...


6

I cannot attest to the use of the lathe for something that small. That is bowlturner's domain after all. This answer also touches on making dowels with a lathe so, in theory, it could be turned. I'm getting into more hand tools myself and if I was to approach this I might use variations of the following approaches. Spoke shave: They are meant for shaping ...


6

I would not want to start with 1/2" x 1/2" square stock unless you have a table saw. Trying to rip small stock with the tools you listed would be quite difficult (and dangerous). Instead, start with a bigger piece of stock, say 1x6. Mark a line 1/2" in from one edge. Put your circular saw at a 45 degree bevel and rip along that line.


6

TL;DR Return or sell the 2x4, "drill bit" / "dowel blade" and/or skip lunch and use the money to buy a pack of 1000 ready-made dowels online. Is there a way to extend the length of a dowel blade? I am not familiar with "dowel blades". There are blades for dowel-cutting saws which are the same as flush-cutting saws. These are for cutting through the ...


5

I was quite surprised by your assertion that you can't make dowel on a lathe. So I asked my uncle, and we went out to the shop and made some on the lathe. It is not hard, just slow. To control breakage use both a tailstock and midpoint support and limit your effective length by keeping your tool near a support. This does require moving the mid support ...


5

While a 1/4" pair of dowels would likely be able to hold a guitar if left alone, a good twisting bump might break them off. A 1/2" dowel would be plenty, and I think a 3/4" dowel (at 3-4") would be able to hold me without breaking (200 lbs.) I would recommend 1/2" since that would be plenty strong and still small enough not to be obvious for your display. ...


5

There are two main purposes that I know of. First, the flutes allow air to escape and glue to fill the voids as you are inserting the dowels. Without them, it is possible that you would not be able to insert the dowel all the way into the hole. Secondly, the flutes are produced by compressing the dowel, and once exposed to moisture (glue), the compressed ...


4

The joint you are probably thinking of is a mortise and tenon joint. Such a joint is very strong, but strength is relative. If you have the top securely fastened to the file cabinet, and only need the dowel as a leg to keep it from tipping, a 1 1/4" dowel would have enough strength for that purpose, but fastening it to a relatively thin tabletop would be ...


4

Excellent answer already from grfrazee, just wanted to add some practical options. The tool to use would be one just like this (but not necessarily this one): I see in the Comments that you say this isn't terribly expensive but I'd like to offer a cheaper alternative to anyone for whom $50 or so, for a seldom-used tool, might be a bit much. Behold: Yes, ...


4

If I am going to make threaded dowel for a vise what do I need to consider. I can think of two things. Wood Something like a maple; at least a hardwood minimum I think you'll find that a lot of larger threaded screws made of wood (in the USA, at least) were/are made of hard maple. This is what Lake Erie Toolworks uses for their vise screws. Hard ...


4

Chuck the dowel in a drill and make a jig. Two pieces of wood 90 degrees. Glue sandpaper to them and then turn on the drill. Depending on how much you want to take off and it doesn't sound like much I would use a lighter grit. Good luck.


4

You can use your drill. You'll need a bit whose size is the same as the diameter of the inner curve you want to cut. Clamp your dowel stock firmly, position the drill so the outer edge of the bit is at the spot you want the curve to be, and drill. Clean up the cut, if needed, with some sandpaper wrapped around another dowel. As @Graphus mentioned in a ...


3

Try this location (there may be others, but this came up almost immediately when I Googled "dowel caps".) for a selection of plastic dowel caps with eyelets. (see below from the afore mentioned link Unfortunately, at this location they want to sell them in quantities of 1000's. I'm certain you can find sites that will sell to you in smaller amounts. ...


3

Is there another method of working the dowel that will get a similar functional result? You could maybe make a dowel plate, but instead of drilling a regular hole through the steel plate, make a series of smaller holes in a circle that approximate the cross-section profile you're going for, then punch out the section where the dowel goes through. Or, ...


3

The Finewoodworking May 27, 2015, edition has an article on making dowel. I would suggest a dowel plate which seems easier and safer than using a router. Rather than cutting the stock for the plate with a saw, I would split it with a clever, froe or chisel to ensure that the grain is running straight through the dowel.


3

For completeness I would like to mention their are some commercial solutions available as well. This is one of several examples. It has parts that let you make dowels from 1/4" to 1" in diameter. Image from LeeValley Tools This one in particular functions on the same principal as the Mattias Wandel's method shown in a couple of the answers here. There ...


3

Given that you're using a hardwood, one foot of material can be turned down to 1/4" (6mm). Make sure that the entire piece is very round and vibration free when you start, and try to keep the spinning mass low (ie, reduce it evenly - don't make one area thin, then move on to the next). This article shows a similar, perhaps more challenging turning, but ...


3

I was going to suggest using a block with a hole drilled through it, but without a drill press this would be difficult to make. Instead I would suggest a hand saw, some clamps, and a guide block. The block should be positioned so that the bottom of the blade aligns with the start of the flat bit. Wrap the dowel with masking tape with the edge marking the ...


3

It's unlikely that going from a 1/2" hole to a 3/4" hole will cause the frame to fail, but not impossible; Just highly unlikely. The foot, at 2" square, should be fine. A ball-park minimum would be twice the diameter into each part (so 1-1/2" deep holes, 3 inch long dowel.) Something that new workers often underestimate is how difficult it is to drill the ...


3

but it occurred to me that my 3/4" dowel rod might yield a stronger leg then the previous 1/2" whatever they used It would, but the strength might not really be needed. 1/2" dowel in a good wood is very strong as long as there isn't grain 'runout' (grain should run as straight as possible along the dowel, not at an angle to the length). If you could drill ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible