16

The 4x4 posts used for the legs support virtually "infinite" weight longitudinally. Now, of course, given a naive design, each leg would only transmit force onto one 4x2 beam (which are then maybe nailed together with some kind of ledge or so), which isn't optimal. You most definitely want to connect the beams with a dovetail batten or a similar construct ...


14

Steam bending would be your only option. Wetting the fibers and allowing them to bend and twist. It might not work, but there is a chance. Not using a moister measure, you will just split the wood where the stresses get to great. On top of that, you will have to redry the wood back to where you need it and you will need to keep a lot of weight on it so ...


14

When determining the load bearing capacity of any structure, you'll need to take into account several different factors: Acceptable deflection Maximum allowable bending stress Column compressive and buckling strengths For calculating deflection, @rob's suggestion of using the Sagulator is a good start. You don't need to have an in-depth grasp of all the ...


12

The other answers have covered how you can bend the wood, but one thing they left out relates to the length of the wood. The following applies to some other defects too like bows. You mentioned you have 6ft boards, but you don't say what your final board length will be. If the length will be shorter than 6ft, then it would be advisable to cut them to ...


11

Just to find the load bearing capacity of the horizontal bench top, I'd treat it like a shelf and run the numbers through some sort of load-bearing calculator like the sagulator. The load-bearing capacity will also depend on whether the weight is mostly toward the center or if it is evenly distributed. Ideally you would laminate (thoroughly glue) several ...


7

Bending using heat (usually steam) is one of the only ways to bend wood reliably. But, when a board twists as it dries that is usually not permanently fixable because the wood may have 'taken a set'. So while you could steam, bend back to perfectly flat and hold it there until it has cooled, and it may stay that way initially, it is likely to have a natural ...


6

There is no real harm in proceeding with the deck. The wood is a bit wet, but will dry out from air movement in short order with no real risk of mold or other damage occurring. This type of structure is quite flexible and will easily absorb any movement from swelling or shrinkage (which will be very minor anyways). Wood framed homes and other structures ...


5

I have tried to straighten a wood screen door with steam with very little improvement. I then forceably bent it well past straight, 1 1/2 inches in center of the 7 foot span. Then saturated it with linseed oil and carefully heated the board with a propane torch. It is holding it's shape after a week.


3

I wouldn't if you can wait. It would be better to let the wood dry out before you work on the roof further. You shouldn't worry too much about the wood itself as wood won't normally get damaged by being wet like this over a limited timeframe. And you don't have to be overly concerned about the structure, although ideally you protect any part-built wooden ...


3

I'm not an expert in wood species, so maybe someone who knows more can weigh in more authoritatively, but I'd be inclined to use a species like Maple for this purpose. I think you'll find that's what the holds in your picture are made from. Douglas Fir is strong in the sense that it can bear high compressive axial (in line with the grain) loads. It probably ...


3

First, my flat answer: For a 12' span backyard monkey bar set I'd use four clear (no knots) 2x8's - two each side. Use threaded pipe flanges screwed to the inner (hidden) face of the inner 2x8's (in a counterbore) to anchor pipe sections. Assemble inner 2x8s and pipe, then laminate the outer 2x8's onto the inner ones. Yes, that will be heavy, but not ...


2

You can always take the Calvin & Hobbes approach!


2

I am wondering if douglas fir is a strong enough wood to use for this purpose. It might be, but it would depend on a few factors. These include how it's used (force relevant to the grain direction), whether the wood is bare or has a finish applied, and whether solid pieces or glued-up sections are utilised — one or two pieces pictured in the Question aren'...


1

It isn't so much about the wood as it is about the screw. Almost any wood would be fine as long as you don't have a bad grain. Now the screw is a different issue. https://www.screwdoctor.com/application/home/selection_guide/technical_data.aspx These are the shear values for screws. If you are attaching thru dry wall material the screw isn't in pure shear ...


1

Under the assumption that you will use some kind of design resembling the picture you posted, especially the diagonal braces on the ends, I would use two 2x6 for each side rail. Capable of supporting a 50-75 lb child swinging in the middle (6 feet from either end). And possibly multiple kids if the neighbors invade the backyard. I think the lumber will ...


1

Little late but...I tought about how you straighten a door, using wood block on the 'to in' corner and close the door for a 36h, door is most time corrected. So, I put wood blocks under the two lowest corners, whem board lying flat on floor, then put heavy weight on middle on a high humidity day. Seems to work for now, will follow up.


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