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8

Generally-speaking, you can use whatever type of wood and finish appeal to you. Depending on your application, you may want the door to be either lighter or heavier. If the door is closing off a movie room, you may want a more solid, thicker, heavier door to better absorb and deaden the sound. Of course, if you really want to block sound, you'll probably ...


7

Generally how I do it is after ripping the wood, line them all back up. then flip every other board over the long way. If the board wants to cup, flipping every other board reduces how much it can cup, because each one will want to 'bend' in the opposite direction. By flipping them the long way it also helps with bows and twisting.


6

The doors should have no problem clearing each other assuming the hinge pivot is in line with the seam between doors and the stationary part of the cabinet as viewed from the top. The edges of the door you are concerned about will scribe a circular arc, as they swing outward, with the maximum approach to each other only when closed.


5

The diamond piece could be cut with a router planing jig - basically, a pair of rails that sit on your work table, along with a sled that your router is mounted to. The sled rides on the rails, which allows the cutter to move along a 2-D plane a fixed height above the work table. It's almost like an upside-down router table, in the sense that your workpiece ...


5

One option if you don't mind a little math, careful blade height adjustments, and using a hand plane: Calculate the depth at a series of distances from the center of the pyramid, say every quarter inch. Set a table saw blade height (carefully) to that depth and cut concentric squares around the pyramid at each corresponding depth. Make sure the inside of ...


5

The traditional way to do this, is to have the central diamond be on piece of wood, and the raised portions around the edge be a separate frame. The frame is held together with mortise and tenon joints, and has a groove into which the central panel fits. The central panel is not glued in place, to allow for expansion. Normally, the central panel is a ...


5

There are generally speaking two ways people go about this kind of work these days, using a router or jigsaw. Router With the router you'd use a suitable straight-cutting bit with a bearing guide in conjunction with a template made from thinner material, running the bearing carefully around the inside perimeter of the template while being careful to avoid ...


5

My plan was to build a box, then cut it open, but that might not work. That is the usual way of building a lid for a box. You build a hollow cube with no lid, then cut the lid off. This guarantees the lid will match up with the box. Minimizing the kerf is going to depend on the tools you have at your disposal. I've cut box tops off with a table saw, which ...


5

Buy a new door. Refinishing Unless there's something unusual about the door that's not evident from the description it literally isn't worth the time and effort to strip and refinish. Even if you price your time at $0.00 (which is fine, many do for home projects) there's a strong argument to be made that it's still not worth the costs involved, unless you ...


4

To lead from a comment you made on another answer In a hospital I used to work in, the fire doors were made out of wood and were rated at 1.5 or 2 hours of protection as a function of their thickness. I think I get it now. The doors you speak of do not stop fire dead. It's not about fire protection but more about giving time for people to be able to leave ...


4

If you're looking for structural integrity, not pretty, simply nail a 2x4 to the wall against the flat trim. Several 16d nails should be sufficient to hold your weight. If you need something to look nicer, you might get a 1x? (width to match the existing trim) and replace the existing trim, then stain to match. Use finishing nails to hold it up, but since ...


4

First, cut a measuring jig from half-inch plywood. Make it U-shaped, 12 by 12 inches with a large notch to match the wall thickness. Use the jig to quickly scan each door opening. If the notch is cut medium, then you can gauge thin wall (jig fits loosely) and medium wall (jig just slides over.) A thicker wall will prevent the jig from sliding over. Then ...


3

The exact amount you need can be calculated using the pythagorean theorem. See the modified diagram below, with a triangle overlayed on it: You already labeled the 16mm dimension. You then need to measure X (the distance of the opening). From there you can use a^2 + b^2 = c^2 (or to plug in the values on the diagram, 16^2 + X^2 = Y^2; to change it around ...


3

It sounds like the "bumps/roughness" you're seeing are "orange peel". It could also be a "sandpaper" texture. That's usually an indication of a "dry" spray. I.e. the material is drying before it hits the surface. It could also be dust nibs which are contamination in either the air (which I doubt because you said you set up a makeshift booth) or in your ...


2

Focusing more on the wood itself in that picture my first instinct for stability and ease of assembly was to use some hardwood flooring. Since hardwood flooring is already tongue and groove it will make for a very strong door with minimal effort. The metal would then be used to keep the wood together aside from glue possibly. The couple of downsides ...


2

That door is held together by the metal strips across the face. another which can be all wood would have the 'Z' on one side. You can use any wood, pine would be fairly light and easy to move, but easy to ding up. Oak would look nice, but be a little heavier, but a good rolling system shouldn't make it a big deal. ETA: when making one of these it is ...


2

If it's sealed well, any wood should really be sufficient. Cedar has a little more natural rot repellent, and so does Tamerack, though I haven't seen much Tamerack actually for sale. Pine, Basswood are both a little more susceptible to sitting moisture so I would likely avoid them. Oak, maple and most decent hard woods would be fine, though a little heavy ...


2

The correct choice is an inset face frame hinge. An example hinge can be seen here, and the following is an explanation of the different terms: Inset means the door is inside of the cabinet instead of on the front of the cabinet Face frame designates that the hinge will be attached to the face frame, as opposed to Euro style hinges which are attached to ...


2

It would be a better idea to screw a sheet of steel to it on both sides.


2

What is the drawer overlay on the 27mm panel? If it is more than 9mm you will have to use half-overlay hinges (as you won't have the 18mm needed for a full overlay.)


2

If you're going to build a wall, just build a wall. Framing lumber is pretty cheap. The only trick being that it can be a challenge to find straight pieces. Steps: Get your measurements for the long section. Build the long section on the floor (2" x 4", 16" on center is perfectly sufficient as Ashlar mentioned in the comments). Attach the built frame to ...


2

It looks like this should be repairable. I would probably use a good 2-part epoxy (like West or Entropy) to repair it because it can fill any gaps caused by missing material. Also it does not require clamping pressure like normal wood glue does. The most challenging part of this repair will probably be making sure that the panel does not bond to the epoxy ...


2

My first thought was to sandwich the mesh between a couple of boards There's no need to invent something new here. All the screen doors I've ever seen have the screen wrapped around a frame that's then inserted into the door. There are plenty of articles and plans about screen doors freely available on the net, so search around for a plan that you like. ...


2

. . .what is the recommendation for finishing so we get a nice looking finish that is also nice and safe? As you mentioned in the original post, the key to a nice paint job on something like this is a nice clean strip, and good primer. You'll want to prime the piece, sand it lightly, 320-400 grit is good. After sanding, clean thoroughly with a tack cloth, ...


2

I have installed frames in walls that even vary in width over the length of the jambs. The trick I have used is to make the jambs too wide, dry assemble the jambs with a single nail to loosely hold the head and jambs together, and set them in place. I then score a line on the jambs to match the contour of each wall edge over the perimeter of the opening. ...


2

I built flat board doors, without backing support, for a bathroom vanity (plenty of humidity) 10 years ago that are still flat. I believe one of the keys is to carefully select the individual planks and arrange them properly. First, choose wood where the rings extend through the thickness of the board, rather than its width. Boards will warp more easily ...


2

Generally speaking, the exterior doors to your house are (or, at least, can be made) reasonably air tight. You'll want to use similar type seals for your door. I'm thinking a product similar to this self adhesive gasket: Image of M-D 20-ft x 1/2-in Black Door Seal Silicone Door Weatherstrip supplied by Lowes.com. No endorsement of product or vendor intended ...


2

Use stain remover, and chip a thin layer of wood, then apply a new stain. But I doubt that the pressed veneer is thick enough to allow for any thinning. There's no fixing the existing veneer. Face veneers on plywood are very thin -- the internet says they're 1/30" on average, which means that half the time they're thinner than that. It might be a ...


2

Stain remover worked fine for removing most of the stain and other upper lacquer/sealer layers. A thin layer of veneer then was pressed on the door. All good without buying a new door. Todo: Upload before/after photos, alongside details. Update post after a year to report on the long-term effect.


1

I've replaced about half-a-dozen doors over time. The old ones were mostly very tatty, old, solid-wood doors (rather than hollow-core), but that doesn't matter. The important point is that the new doors are solid wood. This is because the new doors need to fit (exactly) the existing door-frames ... and it is a lot easier to cut 10mm off the side of a ...


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