Hot answers tagged

10

I have never tested it, but I would think that a chipper, with only two teeth, might be quite risky. In a standard blade the teeth are secured in their path by the blade disc which serves to guide and support the teeth in the desired path. Without the rotating mass of the blade disc, I would worry that it is much easier for something to go wrong to make ...


7

Is it safe to use just the chippers in a dado stack? No. The chippers are designed to do just that — chip out the middle of a groove being cut on either side by both outside blades. Some dado stacks come with instructions that state not to use the chippers without both blades, example from Freud, sixth bullet point from bottom: "Always use both ...


6

This is your project, so in the end, it is your call. You have a few options: Do nothing! Try a test fit and see it if looks ok. If so, move on to the next step! Generally speaking, a 2 mm difference over half a meter/a few feet will not jump out at the viewer (unless there are other errors). Nor will it compromise the structure of a bookcase (a forgiving ...


3

Dados would be best, since the mechanical part of the joint will carry most of the load. If you go with butt joints and fasteners, I'd suggest pocket screws instead of either nails or screws into end grain. Pocket screws go into the face of the board instead of the end, so they should hold better. In most cases pocket screws are easier to hide, so you get a ...


3

To answer your question, without actual joinery like dovetails or dadoes, I'd recommend glue-and-screw. That is, some mechanical fastener that actually gives those butt-joints some strength. Because, while PVA glue is incredibly good, it is not at its best with all of the joint being 50% end-grain. Many joints like dove-tails, fingers, dadoes, or rabbets ...


3

I decided to go out on a limb and buy a stack to know for sure, and... It fits! There is a verry small amount of play before tightened, but any less and the blades would scrape over the arbor. I believe this is a proper 5/8" arbor. I do not know about other manufacturer's arbor dimensions, but if you have a DeWalt, you may be in luck. If you are ...


2

The short answer is "no," but I'll elaborate. The dimensions are very critical in this area since small variances at the arbor can have huge effects at the edge of the blade. Also the motor spindle could have been treated differently for the euro model and it could bend or break. If the arbor is even a small fraction oversized, the blade won't fit. ...


2

I know I'm really late to the party on this guys, but since I only heard half of the answer, I want to toss in. It is dangerous for two reasons: first, as stated, torque. It DOES take significantly more energy to move that many large blades. Especially when they're tearing through a substance as chewy as wood. The other one, as briefly touched upon by the OP,...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible