Hot answers tagged

13

The chippers in the stack may vary in height. You can test for that by making a single pass and see if it is smooth. If the chippers are ok, then it is likely technique. Make sure you are holding the work piece down tightly against the table on each pass and make sure there is no sawdust accumulating under it. If you have some uneven joints, you can ...


11

There's another factor you're not considering: torque requirements. There's a reason the majority of dado sets are 6" or 8" in diameter. Most table saws won't have the power to run a 10" set. A 10" set will require 25% more torque than an 8" set, and 67% more torque than a 6" set. Not surprisingly, Matthias over at Woodgears has written an article about ...


10

First, to answer your 3 questions: Yes, you can safely make a 50mm deep cut with a handheld router, but only if you take several passes, only cutting part of the depth at a time. If you try to make the entire cut in one pass, you'll very likely either damage the bit, stall your router, injure yourself, or some combination of these. There are certainly ...


9

I bought a table saw recently and it's the most terrifying tool I own. As a beginner, that is the right attitude. I note that the most dangerous time will be when you are no longer a beginner but not yet an expert; that's when people make careless mistakes. I try to remind myself frequently that my table saw is trying to kill me. It doesn't feel good to ...


9

Instead of making a dado blade you can instead use a sled and then move the workpiece side to side on that to enlarge the dado. Make the outer cuts first and then you have a reference for where the blade should go; the middle cuts aren't that important to get accurate. Or set the fence for the left most cut and clamp a piece of wood the with the same ...


7

noun da·do \ˈdā-(ˌ)dō It's pronounced with both a long 'a' as in day and a long 'o' as in oh. Primary emphasis (indicated by ') is on the first syllable.


6

The sled is made out of 18mm-thick MDF. I would only be leaving behind 3mm thickness of wood to allow a dado deep enough for the T-track. Is that enough? My brain works in Imperial units, so I'm going to convert. Three millimeters is about equal to 1/8". MDF is not a particularly strong material in bending, especially not with that thin of a section. You ...


6

Can I cut dadoes with the work piece against the fence, or should I strictly use a miter gauge or crosscut sled? It depends on the nature of the cut. A dado is technically a slot cut across the grain (a crosscut), so in that sense, yes, you would typically use a miter gauge or sled. A groove is a slot cut with the grain (like a rip cut). Regardless of ...


5

Power tool For a simple, efficient power tool approach I would consider a plunge router using a known straight edge as a guide. Using a straight bit you could cut in where you want and exit just the same. Use the guide to keep your cut true. Image from PopularWoodworking.com If you think of these grooves as flutes there are jigs that can help with the ...


5

I kind of assume that dadoes, grooves, rabbets / rebates should be no deeper than half the thickness of the material. So, in 3/4" stock, dadoes should be no deeper than 3/8". Anything deeper would compromise the integrity of the wood. Is that correct? Broadly speaking yes. In just about any wood, with any joint, if you end up removing more wood than ...


5

There are 2 points of accuracy you'll want: keep the piece moving at the same orientation and get the correct distance from the reference edge to the blade. The second is easy, just set the fence tot he correct position and you are set for that. If you are uncomfortable using the fence as a stop, then you can clamp a bit of wood to the fence so the back end ...


5

I've always heard it pronounced "Day-dough"


4

I think the major danger that riving knives address is binding on the blade from the kerf closing. This is a particular risk with solid wood where there may be stored internal stresses (e.g. when the wood is said to be case hardened) which are released when it is cut, where the wood can twist and actually close the kerf tight in the worst cases. Since this ...


4

Really, do you want to turn that entire 50x50x50mm cube into sawdust? Since you don't have access to a bench saw and the dado alternative , this is what I would advise: Cut each end of the slot with your Skil saw. Knock out the 50x50x50mm piece with your hammer and clean up the bottom of the cut with your a wide chisel. Most of your cuts will require ...


4

There is a good chance it is technique. You need to keep the piece flat near the saw blades. A little rocking action and each pass will be different. having the board flat from the beginning helps, they can easily have a warp which can affect the depth of cut. A slight bow or cup can make a difference too. If there is cupping flat on one side brings the ...


4

My dado stack gives me the exact same results. Depending on the manufacturer of your dado stack it is likely due to the design of the dado stack. Direct quote from the literature that came with my dado stack: "This dado has been designed with beveled outside blade teeth. This means that the outside saws will cut the very outer edges slightly deeper than ...


4

Here's my best practices taken from various online videos and my own experience. I've cut dadoes mostly for kitchen cabinets, fences or drawers. I have an under-powered (1.5HP) 10" contractor table saw and I use 6" blades for my dadoes. (It's actually the 6" version of your Oshlun set.) Accessories My fence A pair of featherboards A miter gauge, push ...


3

I will assume that you do not have a dado stack for this? They are a set of blades designed to cut a dado in one pass. That way using a fence and a mitre sled (most table saws come provided with one.). It does get easier and safer than that though. Some general safety tips apply make sure that if the board is longer than your table saw that it is ...


3

You are correct, a table saw or any other circular saw is not the tool to use for a blind groove. As you have researched there are safety issues, plus the groove will be arched at the ends. It can be done, but is not recommended, especially in conjunction with a first project. The most common approach is to use a router mounted on a router table and use a ...


3

Properly speaking, you don't need any power tools to build a cabinet. (However, that would be tiresome to say the least.) Yes to the router, no to the router table (unless you commit an entire 4x8 sheet to the table), and an additional "yes" to a circular saw with a home-made cutting guide. This picture from woodmagazine.com: They specify 1/2" stock for ...


3

For dados in larger boards, a router guided by a straight edge clamped square to the board can be easier than a router table. There are a number of good jig designs, depending on how often you're going to cut the same dado, how much alignment you want the jig to do automagically, and so on.


3

I can't help with the diagnosis I'm afraid, I have no experience with dado stacks and they're actually not permitted in Europe so that's not going to change any time soon! But your question #1 is relevant to an important issue in woodworking about joint surfaces and proper bond formation, and the point I build towards provides a solution that allows you to ...


3

You are correct to not want to use the fence alone for these cuts. That has a high probability of ending very badly. The miter gauge that came with your saw should be adequate (use it in conjunction with the fence for accuracy), but since it sounds like you're not comfortable with that, here's some alternatives: Build a miter saw sled. Lots of versions of ...


3

When I'm spending money I like to read the negative reviews on a product online. This tells me what is wrong with them and I can decide if the issues are something I can deal with or if it happens to be an 'unlikely' occurrence. Now with a dado set, the first question would be how much would they likely be using them, and what quality of tools do they ...


2

50mm is a trifle under 2 inches. There are certainly 2-inch-long spiral upcut bits, and you could use a guide collar, so this sounds entirely doable -- in multiple passes, preferably, and with a secondary base to bridge the wide opening for stability. Unsure about relative speed.


2

Yes, I don't have any dado blades, anything I would use them for I use a router for. While for long rabbets the dado can be better, good set up and technique the router can do just as good. The router is also much smaller than a table saw (a good one) and has many other uses as well.


2

MDF is worked with the same tools, but it will be characteristically flaky, as you say, and it will tend to dull edges faster. It's not clear what hand tools you have exactly, but I am guessing you have chisels? If have only chisels and circular saw (power drill isn't very useful here), here's what I would do with your setup: lay out the dado. scribe the ...


1

Once you get close to your final dept, remove the spurs and you can score the corners with a matte knife (like the spur) but stop short of the ends.


1

Use a router to make the rabbet or dado. You'd still run into problems if the warping of the plywood is significant even at the size of your router base, but if it's that badly warped you may not want to use the piece to begin with. Clamp straightedges on either side of your dado, offset from your dado by the distance between your router bit and the edge ...


1

Have you compared the holes in the center of each blade? If the spindle on the saw is not level or is bent or the threads or washer are worn, that could be the source of the roughness.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible