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10

As a DIYer, there's no compelling reason for you to go out shopping for a 14" table saw. That said, if you're asking because there happens to be a 14" table saw available to you for an irresistible price, there's nothing inherently wrong with it, but there are some things to be aware of: If you're in the US, you won't be able to get 5 hp out of a ...


5

(I'm hesitant to leave an Answer because we might not have enough information in the Question, but my comment was turning into an answer anyway.) That saw is rated for 13A so it should have the grunt to rip stock like this, but you will have to find the right feed speed, and you may have to choose a more aggressive blade. You might have a combination blade ...


4

If it is a picnic table no problem if it is in the face of a fancy hutch maybe, maybe not. Sometimes the project can be modified to fit, sometimes it really does not matter, and I have had to scrap a large part from expensive wood for a small error (ouch). Sorry for the clear as mud answer. Anyone have a good board stretcher for sale? (no such thing) One ...


4

In addition to a Forstner bit, this can be done with a router and template. The choice probably depends on how many you're making and what power tools you have available. Depending on how deep the hole is, a "trim" or "pony" router would likely do the job. Considerations would include: Availability of a drill press (a forstner bit might not do a great job ...


3

If you want to create a flat-bottomed hole the best tool to use will be a forstner drill bit. You'll probably want to use a drill press to ensure the holes are straight.


3

I have a hunch that the problem with your saw is that the plane of the saw blade is not exactly parallel to the up/down and back/forward paths of the saw motor. This could be caused by: A bent saw blade Some debris clamped between the saw blade, the inside blade thrust washer and the shoulder at the inside end of the saw shaft The motor not mounted with the ...


3

When the blade is entering through the board, it isn't stabilized by the surrounding wood, so it may vibrate a little more than when it's moving forward through the cut. This is probably why the kerf is wider nearer to you. My guess is that if you did the whole cut coming from above one blade-length at a time, you would have the wider kerf all the way ...


2

The simplest is simply to put some masking tape on the exit area. This will (more or less) hold the wood fibers in place and prevent the saw teeth from splitting them off the body of the wood. However, this will work best for tough woods and sharp, fast saws, since the less stress you put on the fibers the better, and the smaller the cut per tooth the ...


2

I did a quick search using the terms "makerspace toronto" and came up with a number of links. One of the links is a collection of locations in the area. In such a metropolitan area as Toronto, you'll likely find a makerspace with a table saw. Additionally, makers in such organizations may have personally owned equipment. Our local makerspace does not have a ...


2

Just to clarify, as I understand your question you want to turn your 2 1/2" thick slab into two slabs that are each the same size but 1"+ thick? This operation is called "resawing". Typically this would be done with a bandsaw, however most home-shop bandsaws max out at around 1' of resaw capacity. For your slab you will need something with a much bigger ...


2

belt sander A belt sander is certainly one way this could be done and it's one of the methods I was just about to suggest1 after reading the first part of your Question. I'm somewhat concerned that this won't be even enough though. A more geometrically precise method would be better, I think. If the belt sander is fixed in place, has a hard platen and ...


2

It sounds to me like your wood is moving after the cut (closing up the kerf) and binding your blade. Assuming this is the case, I'd suggest that you make the cut in several passes. Clamp your track to the keeper piece to make sure it shifts as little as possible between passes. Then cut one foot, stop, raise your saw, move your saw back to the start, cut ...


2

You can't do exactly what you want. The problem is that however you cut round the lid, there will be some thickness which you turn into sawdust (the kerf). If we ignore the difficulty of cutting a stepped edge, it will end up like: |: -------- _____ : | : where the solid lines represent the edge of the hole, and the dotted lines the kerf. The ...


1

I was going to add this as another Comment but I figure it is actually an Answer since you've asked for suggestions. If I were doing this I'd be using a Japanese-style pull saw with fairly fine teeth1, and a mitre box and with a stop clamped in place to ensure consistency. Each cut would take 1-2 strokes, literally about a second per pencil2. Triple that to ...


1

You'll want a mitre saw. Or possibly even a cordless jigsaw would do the job


1

I think (??) that it was a early carbide blade as carbide was really expensive to make, I have seen similar in old Sears catalogs.


1

What sort of machine or tool would I use to cut them all down flat to be even with each other? First check your wall is flat, many are not. I'd use a ruler that is longer than the longest dimension of the artwork and place it edgewise (not flat) against the wall in many horizontal, vertical and diagonal orientations. Many walls are not flat. Do the dowels ...


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