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6

I lay the sheet on top of a 4x8 piece of 2in pink foam insulation board and then just walk/crawl on top of it while pushing the saw along the track. Unless it's a really delicate material, I've never had any trouble. You could also lay a moving blanket and/or a thicker plank on top of where you crawl to spread out the load and avoid any scratches or damage.


4

If it is a picnic table no problem if it is in the face of a fancy hutch maybe, maybe not. Sometimes the project can be modified to fit, sometimes it really does not matter, and I have had to scrap a large part from expensive wood for a small error (ouch). Sorry for the clear as mud answer. Anyone have a good board stretcher for sale? (no such thing) One ...


3

I think what you are asking is: How do I ensure all my vertical boards are the same length. Often, this is more important than being a particular length. Another way to say it is: You desire precision over accuracy. This is a common goal in cabinetry, and you should be pleased that you figured out that it's important. Here is the trick I use to help ...


2

As you're likely aware, cutting beyond the 45° limit of the saw can be challenging. It's necessary to think more vertically than usual. Consider to build a fence that includes a 90° bracket along the entire length (or as needed to provide stiffness) that will permit you to place the angle as desired: Blade represented in red, circular saw plate is yellow, ...


2

It's unclear what you want to use this joint for, but that would be some kind of lap joint. It is cut the same way any "rebate" is cut: with machine tools like a saw or router, or with a hand saw. It depends on the dimensions you are thinking about, and the type of wood. It would not be very strong in a few directions, though. Metal fasteners in wood are ...


2

When I was in the trades we use various guides and rails and such to break down sheet goods. When you run out of arm when pushing the saw you just have to reposition yourself safely. What safely means is dependent on how many people are doing the cut and how comfortable you are with the saw. In practice, what this amounted to is: You stop the saw mid-cut ...


2

I did a quick search using the terms "makerspace toronto" and came up with a number of links. One of the links is a collection of locations in the area. In such a metropolitan area as Toronto, you'll likely find a makerspace with a table saw. Additionally, makers in such organizations may have personally owned equipment. Our local makerspace does not have a ...


2

For this purpose a clamped guide batten and a handsaw (I first read the post thinking panel saw in the handtool sense, with slight confusion!) are probably the most flexible and frugal solution. For support, this would be best paired with a few saw horses and 2x4s as commented above. Of course this depends on how often you'll need to do it, and how precise ...


2

You can't do exactly what you want. The problem is that however you cut round the lid, there will be some thickness which you turn into sawdust (the kerf). If we ignore the difficulty of cutting a stepped edge, it will end up like: |: -------- _____ : | : where the solid lines represent the edge of the hole, and the dotted lines the kerf. The ...


2

belt sander A belt sander is certainly one way this could be done and it's one of the methods I was just about to suggest1 after reading the first part of your Question. I'm somewhat concerned that this won't be even enough though. A more geometrically precise method would be better, I think. If the belt sander is fixed in place, has a hard platen and ...


1

A circular saw and a sawboard make this straightforward. A sawboard is a home-made guide consisting of a straight-edge fastened permanently to a wooden base plate. As original build the base plate is too wide. The final step in building the sawboard is to run the circular saw along the straight-edge to cut the base plate to exactly the correct width. In ...


1

I was going to add this as another Comment but I figure it is actually an Answer since you've asked for suggestions. If I were doing this I'd be using a Japanese-style pull saw with fairly fine teeth1, and a mitre box and with a stop clamped in place to ensure consistency. Each cut would take 1-2 strokes, literally about a second per pencil2. Triple that to ...


1

8 Tooth blades that look exactly like that are still available in hardware stores. They are intended for cutting fiber cement siding.


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