7

I've read about branches having internal stresses and twisting/warping. The main reason not to use wood from branches normally is that it's full of reaction wood, wood that has internal stress from its original orientation of the branch where it was under stress, supporting the weight of the branch and its foliage. When the branch is sawn into planks the ...


7

Needs to be food safe, durable and easy to clean. I know that beech is a good material to use as I have a beech chopping board at home, but would it make it even more durable / easy to clean by oiling the board e.g. with mineral oil? No. What it will do is introduce a 'finish' that never dries and needs to be topped up periodically for the entire service ...


6

If you don't already have one, get a 'router guide bushing' that suits your router. (You might have to replace the base plate to find a bushing that fits.) The only sizing requirement is that the interior of the bushing is bigger than your core bit. You'll want a rectangular chunk of something to sit in the middle of the cutting board. Size it to give you ...


5

How might I make the necessary cuts? I don't think there are cuts where you think there are. The walnut 'inlays' here are not all inlays I'd bet, I can't be sure but I'd bet the boards are built up much as seen, the edges sawn square afterwards and then finally the bowties (AKA butterfly keys or Dutchmen) laid in. If you look carefully at the picture ...


5

Needs to be food safe, durable and easy to clean. I know that beech is a good material to use as I have a beech chopping board at home, but would it make it even more durable / easy to clean by oiling the board e.g. with mineral oil? Is this still food safe etc? Is there anything else I need to watch out for with this? Beech is a fine choice for a chopping ...


3

The comments have a lot of good discussion about wood choice, but to directly answer your question, yes. You can use epoxy to make a surface harder. However, you need to be careful about your choice of epoxy. Normal hardware store epoxy is designed for repair work, i.e. bonding two parts together. To do this effectively it needs to be quite thick. This ...


3

I bet this was a shock, goes to show the power of expanding wood! I think strictly speaking the answer to the question in the title is yes but it's likely beyond the scope of what a non-woodworker can accomplish so best to consider it a gonner. A replacement would be far less hassle, and assuming you don't own some of the requisite tools actually much ...


3

What you are asking is to "resaw" this into more usable lumber. This comes with some challenges: It's ~20 inches in diameter, which is pretty large. It's urban lumber, and no one wants to risk hitting a nail with their expensive saw that can resaw 20 inches. There are a few ways you can resaw this, and one requires finding someone with lumberyard ...


3

A colleague of mine has just come up with a good suggestion so I thought I'd post it as an answer so that anybody looking at this in the future could see it: Use a pre-made kitchen worktop. You can buy a 3-metre length for around £80 ($120ish) and it's already glued up dead flat and straight. Just be careful to get something that is solid timber and pay ...


3

Interesting idea; it never occurred to me. I have a few narrow branches that I thought weren't going to be usable for much more than veneer, but using your approach if I can get a few 1"x1" cross-section sticks out of them I might be able to reassemble them into something more useful. Yes, you want to let the wood dry --and mostly settle into its final ...


3

I had this idea that I would be able to run the hand plane over the surface of the (already smooth) cutting board and peel off whisper-thin shavings. Yes that is exactly what you should be able to do so don't despair you haven't bought into something that isn't going to deliver what you want. Incidentally since you got a no. 5, or jack plane, it's not ...


3

Odds are your that your plane is not sharp enough and is not correctly set yet for your project. A quick test is to attempt shaving a few hairs off of your arm with the iron. If the blade tugs instead of shaves, you need to sharpen it further. There are plenty of questions and answers on this site that discuss problems and techniques for planing success. ...


3

It should be perfectly safe as far as the solvent goes. Regardless if it's made with all real turpentine or only partly with turps, added for the smell, while partly (or mostly) being another solvent1 (a version of mineral spirits/white spirit/Stoddard solvent) these are volatile organic solvents. Volatile solvents are just that, they evaporate and when they'...


2

I made one as well and used grape seed oil. It’s working well after 6 months of daily use.


2

Mineral oil is a food safe finish for cutting boards. Though because it is not a drying oil meaning that it will not harden. It also means that the finish can be washed off. This results in proper care including regular reoiling of the cutting board. You don't get the sheen that you would get with beeswax though you do get a deeper penetration into the wood.


2

Technicaly, you would be able to do it with a good smoothing plane with very tight mouth and really sharp blade - low angle plane could help (but only if the real cutting angle was lower than on "normal" plane - which it often isn't - because of bevel up blade). But as was pointed out in comments (which I think should really be answers), sanding may be much ...


1

It can depend on WHY it's cupping. if there is something in the wood, such as stresses that are being released, not much you can do. It doesn't sound like it's a poor job gluing it up, (as in to much pressure on one edge so the glue job leaves it with an arc). Especially since you planed it down after gluing it up. Now there is one possibility which ...


1

I'll assume that you are asking about this because you are actually making several of these at the same time, and want to stack up the steps. This is often done when when mass producing things like cutting boards. They are often sliced, planed, and jointed from larger chunks. [And I see from your last comment that this is exactly what you are doing.] Of ...


1

It may be difficult to know what exactly is in the turpentine in your product so it is difficult to even determine what residues are left when the turpentine evaporates. Reviews I found on the internet are not clear about toxicity details. I use beeswax mixed 4-1 with medical grade mineral oil (available from any drug store). Just warm the mix up in a sauce ...


1

Depending on the width and number of cracks, the diameter of knot holes, etc, you could make your own "filler" with matching sawdust and a bit of the glue you originally used. Without seeing a picture, and with out knowing what glue you used, it won't be any more or less "toxic" than the rest of the cutting board if it doesn't look too bad. Hopefully, it ...


1

The joint you're referring to is normally known as a "dovetail key" or "butterfly joint". The usage you see here is not typical. Normally this would be used to keep a wider board/slab from "checking", or splitting along the grain from the end of the board. As such, the key would be oriented perpendicular to the grain of the larger board. There are many ...


1

Because its a cutting board, you could scrape it with a razor blade, if any finish comes up, its finished. From the pictures it looks clearly unfinished. I also agree with one of the comments that this is bamboo, which needs less maintenance than some woods. A regular (monthly) oiling with mineral oil would be a standard thing to do. Otherwise it looks ...


1

I can't find a MSDS for Hard Top Oil, but I suspect it is probably safe. However not knowing exactly what is in it would make me very unlikely to use it for anything coming in to contact with food - "a mix of prestigious modified natural oils" is not very specific/reassuring. My Go To for chopping boards and the like is simple food grade mineral oil. ...


1

An addition to existing answers. I used to surface complexly grained woods such as Brazilian Rosewood for guitar backs and sides with planes. Run the plane over the stock at an angle such that the blade makes a 30-45 degree angle with the direction of the plane. The more erratic the grain, the steeper the angle. This will not remedy improper plane ...


1

Little to add to two excellent answers except opinions: You just got your driver's license and you are driving a Bentley. Not a bad thing, except that you will never get to experience the magic of going from a Mercury Montego to a Bentley. Shaving whispers of wood is a basic skill. But it's still a skill that has to be learned. That takes time. Hang ...


1

The resin pockets may not be an issue. The resins from some trees such as pine are commonly eaten (or made into hot drinks) in certain parts of the world, that's how non-toxic it can be. But without specific info on the exact species you're using I don't think you should make any assumptions. "Canadian oregon" is better known to much of the rest of the ...


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