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15

If you can follow my additions to your drawing, I'm hoping it will explain. If you work it this way, you can make a lap joint, and you should be able to have the clean joint you are looking for: Route to the end of the left board, then extend just the top portion of the right board to match the notch. This should give you the crisp corner you are looking ...


13

Rockler has a great guide on understanding hinges. Full overlay hinges are for individual cabinets or the cabinets on either end of a run of cabinets. (Source) Half overlay hinges are intended for pairs of doors in the middle of a run of cabinets, where two doors have their hinges mounted on opposite sides of a shared middle partition. (Source) Although ...


13

The sagulator will give deflection values for horizontal shelf spans using various materials and thicknesses. Unless you are working with extremely heavy loads (more than the weight of a countertop with people dancing on it), 3/4" material for the (vertical) cabinet walls should be more than adequate. As you make the walls thinner, they will still remain ...


11

When I don't want to make messy marks, it's blue painter's tape all the way. (There are various options, in terms of how long you can leave it on. Just remember to peel it in time.)


11

I presume it's obvious but I'll say it anyway, accurate layout and marking on the wood is an all-important first step. I have used my jigsaw or chisel for similar cuts on other projects. While I wasn't aiming for high precision on those projects, it seems too sloppy to achieve the precision for cabinetry. I wouldn't myself do these kinds of cuts using a ...


8

I don't know the name of that bit profile but it's possible the cut is done using just a portion of a bit, e.g the highlighted portion here: Source: Rockler tambour bit set. Edit: thanks to the Comment below from Aloysius Defenestrate, the correct bit to use for this is called, obviously enough, a drawer-pull bit. As theorised a portion of the bit is used ...


8

The other answers are great from a technical standpoint, but they overlook the much simpler solutions which are actually used on mass-produced arcade cabinets. If you look at commercially-produced arcade cabinets, you will find that the construction methods are much simpler than you might expect. For example, the TMNT "Turtles in Time" cabinet that is ...


7

With those types of hinge, you do not need any clearance between doors. My kitchen cupboards use that type of hinge and mostly have a 1/4" gap. In one place there is no gap at all. I just trapped a piece of paper there with the door closed, when I opened the door the paper fell out. The door opens and closes smoothly. The hinge movement pulls the hinged ...


6

I also do not own one of these. However, Gerstner offers a DIY tool chest build kit, with video instructions. I am presuming their DIY kits are constructed similarly to their pre-built chests. There is a 5-drawer kit, 7-drawer kit, a 2610 kit, and a few others. There are pictures of the parts there (here are the drawer and cabinet parts for one of the kits, ...


6

Rabbets / rebates (UK), and dadoes. A butt joint is fine for general cabinetry, but if you have the equipment and time, cutting rabbets for panels to fit in makes everything so much tighter. I rabbet the sides for the toe-kick, bottom shelf, and top braces; then put a rabbet along the back edge for 1/4" plywood to fit into. That really locks the thing ...


6

It sounds like you want a mitered corner. You will want to find the overall angle of the piece in relation to the vertical one. Just a guess but it looks like it is 15-20 degrees above horizontal level from the corner. Lets go with 20°. The overall angle is 90 from the vertical piece to the level + our 20 above for a 110 degree inside angle. This means ...


5

Building a 2x2 frame first certainly works, but it unnecessarily complicates building a plywood cabinet. More typical cabinet construction uses butt joints with the pieces joined with one or more of the following strategies: pocket screws nails or screws through the face of one piece and into the end grain of the other piece cleats on the inside corners, ...


5

A commercial grade door closer might do the trick. A door closer can be set with a limit to prevent the door from opening too far, and can close the door once triggered. It gets its power when the user initially opens the door. In your case, you would rig the closer in reverse to assist (close) when you open the lid and resist when closing it. The ...


5

There are no set distances for shelf standards, the reason being that how close together you want or need them to be depends on various factors, including: Shelf material Shelf thickness The expected load on the shelf The distribution of the load Material For an equivalent thickness particleboard/chipboard sags more readily than oak, pine sags more readily ...


4

You are now in the process of removing the old finish which is exactly what you were attempting to avoid by employing the liquid sander/deglosser.. The manufacturers of the deglosser (note it is not deglazer, a product used for leather preparation) specify to use it for preparing a previously finished surface for refinishing with no need to remove any ...


4

We are dealing with two different measurements here, frame width and frame thickness. I'm not entirely sure which you are referring to, so I'll cover both. Also, you can reference this useful page: Glossary of Cabinet Hinge Terms An Overlay door will cover over (lay over) part of the face frame of the cabinet opening. As opposed to an Inset, or Inlay, door ...


4

Forward: I don't own one of these chests, authentic or otherwise. Chests of this style are certainly a marvel of tolerance for their design. Looking at an image of one (presumably authentic) you can see the drawers use a tongue and groove. The front is a lap (I can actually see on the 3rd drawer down on the right has something more than a lap but I can't ...


4

In my view this is a question of "Do I control my materials or do they control me". Your concern that your warped pieces may not meet well is valid. Every project should begin with a plan for what you intend to achieve and then constructed accordingly. Your idea in the fourth paragraph is a good strategy. Begin by assembling the framework for your boxes ...


3

It appears from the picture provided by Matt that Gerstner simply used "side-hung" drawers. Here's an illustration showing the basics of the mechanics: [Source: Hoosier cabinet plans] So presumably the smooth action is the result of good fit and tolerances, the use of well-seasoned wood and possibly a little waxing now and then to keep things sliding ...


3

Rob and TX Turner have good advice. For me, it's butt joints, biscuits, glue and screws (either pocket if they have to be hidden, or clearance drilled/countersunk if they don't have to be hidden). The joy of biscuits (for me) is that they force alignment when you're assembling the carcase. If you make the biscuits asymmetrical, you won't accidentally flop/...


3

Whenever I see demonstrations of applying linseed oil to wood, people are always applying it to the finished piece. Is this still the correct approach when working with cabinetry panels, that have been designed to allow for wood movement? I would recommend oiling the floating panels before assembling into the frame. This will have the benefit that ...


3

The body of the object. The case or other major structure that carries the door, drawers, shelves, et cetera. May be a box of some kind, may be a tabletop and supports, may be other. Usually the thing that gets the name -- the chest in a chest of drawers, the workbench in a wokbench with various storage and vises, the case in a bookcase -- but not always (...


3

But as I'm getting nearer that step, I'm dreading the extended painting effort.... I'll end up going through more than 20 clean-up cycles with my brushes. Two big tips can help here: don't clean your brushes between painting sessions, or use rollers. Actually I'd recommend rollers anyway but I'll get to that in a second. Keeping a brush from drying out ...


3

Welcome to Wood Working Stack exchange. I would get a table saw for this cutting. It will allow you to cut any angle from 0* (90*) to 45*. You need to find the angle(s) in which you have to cut. It is not necessarily going to be 30* and 30* to get the angle you need. You may have to use two different angles. When you find the angles I recommend that you take ...


3

What I believe what your cabinet-maker is getting at is that most stacked European-style cabinets (like you have, with no visible face frames) are incorporated into the same carcass as the lower-uppers, which makes it easy to line up all the doors and ensure they line up exactly; since you want to add a separate carcass above the existing one, getting the ...


3

I agree with your concern that frame might not give an art deco appearance. The thinnest panel I would recommend without a frame is 3/4" thick for widths up to about 30". It is important that you keep your individual strips at a max of 3" and orient them so that the grain directions alternate between pieces so that if one wants to warp to the inside, the ...


3

Are you referring to a "tambour door"?


3

You don't need to calculate it, you don't even need to measure it* — you can mark directly from the work. This has long been the standard way this sort of thing is done in carpentry and woodworking, from before the days of widespread numeracy, the availability of calculators, and now 3D software. Make the three-sided box (doesn't have to be glued together ...


3

The answer to this question could be simple or complex depending on exactly what sort of joinery or cabinet making you're talking about - you're asking it in a fairly generic context. That said, it sounds like you're talking about joining individual boards with butt joints to make a larger panel. You've mentioned dowels - they are sometimes used when joining ...


2

The correct choice is an inset face frame hinge. An example hinge can be seen here, and the following is an explanation of the different terms: Inset means the door is inside of the cabinet instead of on the front of the cabinet Face frame designates that the hinge will be attached to the face frame, as opposed to Euro style hinges which are attached to ...


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