14

This is called a butcher block. It comes in two types - edge grain (like in the Norden tables), where the surface shows the edge (long) grain of the pieces of wood: And end grain, where the surface shows the end grain of the pieces of wood: Butcher block is made from small pieces, which are glued together. Since wood glue is stronger than the wood it binds,...


6

whenever I wash the board with water and soap, the glue becomes visible, as though it is returning to its uncured state Most PVA-type glues (the majority of woodworking glues used today) are clear/transparent in a thin film but slightly sensitive to water, going cloudy/milky if wetted, which I presume is what you're seeing. It's not much to worry about ...


5

There are various ways of introducing wax to wood, including dissolving the wax into the mineral oil (this makes what some call "board butter" or "spoon butter"), making up a conventional paste wax, or by applying it molten. The goal here is to get the wax to be absorbed by the wood as deeply as possible, not just to apply a coat of wax to the surface which ...


3

Basically, yes. Grain orientation in a board is all that determines what we refer to as quarter-sawn wood (it isn't always, as the name suggests, about how the wood was sawn1) and if you orient the wood in a glued-up top correctly, so the radial direction is horizontal, that's what you get. When this works out properly the glued-up top you end up with ...


3

Great tips here ! I'll add one more, that's worked great for years on large blocks on my BBQ trailer and at home. I simply put the bees wax on the boards, after melting or even grating, then "iron" it in. Yep, spread the wax on the board, cover with parchment paper or wax paper and iron it at low heat (no steam). This pushes the wax around and ...


3

You're fine. All that's happening is that the glue us acting as a finish, sealing the wood in that area so it doesn't soak up water. You could scrape or sand the area to reduce this effect. Most woodworking adhesives are quite sufficiently nontoxic when cured.


3

One thing to watch out for: butcher-block veneers, and plastic laminates with this pattern printed into them, also exist. Of course these have very different durability characteristics than real butcher-block. Ikea is somewhat notorious for veneer-over-MDF construction; I would hope they were clear about what you're buying but you may want to ask Similarly, ...


3

It would be way easier to add edging to a board, rather than to rout out a pocket in a single, monolithic piece of wood. To connect edging to a board you would first cut 45-degree angles on each of the 4 pieces of edging (if you have a mitre saw). To attach the edging to the main board there are multiple options: (1) glue, (2) biscuits, (3) dowel pins, (4) ...


3

One option would be to mount a long baseplate on your router (like a long piece of plywood or mdf with a hole in it for your bit), so that it spans across the width of the butcher block at all times. Then if you use a flush trim bearing bit, you can create a template the size of the cutout, and work your way out from the middle until your are flush trimming ...


3

I have heard that glue won't stick well on oiled wood, is this true? Yes that's right. The oil resists the glue intermingling with the surface wood fibres which prevents the formation of a proper bond with the wood. This is true with all glues, but is particularly a problem with waterbased glues such as PVA (both white and yellow types). Is there any ...


2

First, if you plan on gluing the end grain edges together, the joint will not be reliable itself. You could cut and insert a spline into both pieces or use biscuits, as is often done in laminated counter-tops. Since the splines would be into unoiled, wood glue adherence will not be a problem. For any joints into the side grain (your left side face), I ...


2

I have a method that works great to get the wax deep into the board. I preheat my oven to 175F and then turn it off but leave the light on to provide some additional heat. I then let the heat even out and cool to about 150F. I put the cutting board in the warm oven, and when it is heated through I take it out and rub it with raw bees wax like a big crayon. ...


2

My question is how to do the glue-up in such a way as to eliminate any gaps where I glue the strips end-to-end in a given row. You don't need to worry overmuch about the tightness (or not) of these staggered end-grain joints as far as strength goes because they're essentially irrelevant in that regard. Occasionally these aren't even glued, without it ...


2

This certainly appears to be a wood movement issue, if you look very closely at the first image, you can see the dark (walnut?) square block is not as wide as the maple behind it, yet the cut lines on the right side line up. Assuming the block sizes where the same when the butcher block was assembled the block that separated is slightly smaller.


2

This is perfectly normal with dilute coats of varnish, especially on something like the counter top material you bought where the grain direction, piece to piece, can be (usually is) so varied. In some spots (e.g. around knots) the grain will be nearly at right angles to the surface, and these areas are much more absorbent1 than the majority of the wood, ...


2

Technicaly, you would be able to do it with a good smoothing plane with very tight mouth and really sharp blade - low angle plane could help (but only if the real cutting angle was lower than on "normal" plane - which it often isn't - because of bevel up blade). But as was pointed out in comments (which I think should really be answers), sanding may be much ...


1

We finally got the board back in hand. @GraphussupportsMonica's comments seem to ring true - this board is severely water damaged. It feels like sandpaper, all the oil and wax has been ripped out of it, and it has numerous joint failures. So, alas, it was no match for a dishwasher. We feel.. foolish.. for agreeing to replace without inspecting first, but it ...


1

Don't worry about the end-to-end butt joints. I think you mentioned the right answer in your question. Make sure that the ends are square, put some glue on them, then as you're gluing up the sides of the long boards, make sure to push the butt joints together firmly. The butt joints don't have any structural significance (as long as they're staggered ...


1

I'd glue up the individual pieces first. Use a dowel in the end to keep it aligned and add some strength to the end grain to end grain joint. Make sure you have good, clean ends. If you are making the cross cuts with a table saw, flip every other board top to bottom. This will cancel out any slight deviation from 90°. Once all of the pieces are glued to ...


1

I can't find a MSDS for Hard Top Oil, but I suspect it is probably safe. However not knowing exactly what is in it would make me very unlikely to use it for anything coming in to contact with food - "a mix of prestigious modified natural oils" is not very specific/reassuring. My Go To for chopping boards and the like is simple food grade mineral oil. ...


1

Wood glue is slightly soluble in water and even more so in vinegar. I wouldn't worry about it because the glue will dry to its orginal state. I wouldn't put the cutting board in the dishwasher though as the heat and water will eventaully weaken the bond. If you're concerned about moisture and the integrity of your laminations, I would recommend TiteBond ...


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