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9

You will want to do the woodburning before you apply finish. It's usually a good idea to lightly sand the area around the woodburn after doing the burning and before applying finish. Woodburning has a tendency to create little ridges at the periphery of the burn. Make sure you remove all of the sanding dust from the stick before applying finish. This can ...


8

bowlturner's answer is correct, and will probably give you the results you are looking for. But it inspired me to experiment, mostly to see how sharp an edge I could get. Hardwood Guide As you can see, just setting down a piece of hardwood makes an obvious, if not sharp, line. The main problem is getting into the corner. I tried to only scorch the pine, so ...


5

I am assuming you are using the torch to 'scorch' the wood and not really burn it. I think that clamping another piece of wood as a "sacrificial piece" onto the line should work just fine. Doing this light enough and you can reuse the one board over and over again. if it is getting to burnt than run it through the jointer to square it up again. Using a ...


3

You can certainly do this with epoxy but you could use shellac or varnish to achieve the same end, just a little more slowly*. You could probably do this quite well with a spray lacquer too, depending on what's available to you locally. You're probably not thinking of the long term on this piece but one thing to note for the future is that epoxy does ...


2

Cordwood is one term that well applies. It means wood cut into uniform lengths, usually for fuel though it can also apply when that sort of wood is used for construction as in cordwood houses. The machine itself is a guillotine style wood cutter (not to be confused with guillotine splitter). The one in the video ...


2

What @grfrazee said, plus... In your garden (assuming you do not own a professional laquerer shop with suction, which you don't, seeing how you ask), with a breathing mask, gloves, and long sleeves on. Not anything different. PU is pretty idle, safe and chemically neutral once hardened, but this cannot be said about the various other isocyanates that are ...


1

There are commercial versions of this branding iron available, either electrically heated or heat-with-torch. The easy-to-find versions are standard "from the workshop of" patterns, but custom is possible, as is homebrew. I am not convinced that aluminum has the thermal mass needed to do a good job, but it could be an interesting experiment....


1

If you only need to present a darker wood, but not charred or completely black, aluminum foil or aluminum tape should work well. Aluminum is great because it conducts heat very well, spreading the heat harmlessly across a larger surface of metal. wide aluminum tape should give you a very sharp line without the problems that the corners of higher templates ...


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