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13

This is what's called a bandsaw box, and this particular one was probably created using roughly the steps below, which are slightly different from those for a more typical bandsaw box. cut off front and back of log cut out outer shape of drawer cut off back of drawer cut out compartments glue back of drawer back on glue front of log onto front of drawer ...


10

Butt joints are the easiest joint to make and have been used for centuries. You need to account for the width of the corners that over lap when making size cuts with this joint but it isn't that hard. Screws, glue, nails all can be used to attach the joint, depending on the use the box will be used for. The only tools you really need for this joint is a ...


9

How can I hollow out a square hole in a solid piece of wood to make a box? There are multiple ways this might be done, going back to a stone-age method where you'd burn out the hollow, but there are two main methods I think would be employed today depending on the philosophy or preference of the individual. 'By hand' The first manual method is actually ...


7

I am a novice woodworker. I found pocket hole joints easy and sturdy. You'll need: a pocket hole jig Drill Driver and the appropriate screws The biggest negative to a pocket hole joint is the large pocket holes. You can will need to use a nice bit of filler to cover it or use a plug.


6

The sliding dovetail joint like the one in your picture will work fine, but in the corner a half sliding dovetail (like this) would be more stable since the outer feather will be thicker overall and will have full-length fibers rather than mostly cut-through fibers. My attempt at drawing a (exaggerated) sliding half dovetail: A simple, straight sliding ...


6

The doors should have no problem clearing each other assuming the hinge pivot is in line with the seam between doors and the stationary part of the cabinet as viewed from the top. The edges of the door you are concerned about will scribe a circular arc, as they swing outward, with the maximum approach to each other only when closed.


5

My plan was to build a box, then cut it open, but that might not work. That is the usual way of building a lid for a box. You build a hollow cube with no lid, then cut the lid off. This guarantees the lid will match up with the box. Minimizing the kerf is going to depend on the tools you have at your disposal. I've cut box tops off with a table saw, which ...


5

I have done something similar using baltic birch plywood for boxes that are up to about 8" by 8" by 8". The first challenge is to make certain that the miters are cut exactly 45 degrees. If you cannot achieve that, tight, closed joints are impossible (see How do I cut a 45 degree bevel on a table saw with consistent dimensions?) When making a five surface ...


5

The corner butt joint would be the very simplest joint to use for joining the sides of a box: This requires very little in the way of tools at the most basic, in theory you only need one saw to cut your wood to length. Then you simply fasten the pieces together — this can be done with glue alone, and without the aid of clamps if necessary. I should mention ...


5

I think the most sturdy way to put a bottom in a box is to capture it with grooves on the sides. With a rabbet the glue joint is holding the bottom on, while in a groove the structure of the wood itself is holding the bottom in place. For added strength I would make the bottom out of plywood (so it doesn't change size) and glue it into the grooves. This ...


4

For the sake of argument, say we're building a metal and wood box where the metal comprises the frame of the box, but the wood comprises the panels (and assume that we're not using plywood or some sort of expansion resistant composite.) How do we attach the wood to the steel in such a way where expansion isn't a problem? Unless you can provide some means ...


4

I thought it would be better to have pictures of the tape method for greater clarity as well as to future-proof things in case of changes to any of the external links provided in this and other Answers. First thing you do is lay down the sides of the box flat on the table and apply tape across each corner joint: Note tape is on the faces opposite the ...


4

Normally, being rather new to woodworking, I refrain from providing answers to people's questions, but I think I have a method that might help here. If you start out with an oversized piece of wood (say, 3x4x1) you should be able to clamp a sacrificial board to your piece and cut at least 3 of the 4 sides with the mitre saw set to a 45° cut. For the last ...


4

one-eighth inch beech plywood is a common material for laser cutting, specifically for creating custom boxes as you describe. There are extensions to Inkscape for making boxes with tabbed edges, also described as finger joints. You would not need the software to create your boxes, unless you had a laser cutter. You could use the software to make paper ...


3

The problem is that once you've cut your first curve you lose that side as a flat, square reference surface for cutting the second curve with a bandsaw/router. You can get around this easily by starting with your squared stock a couple of inches longer than the finished length. Draw the curves on the inside faces and cut out with a bandsaw. Don't cut (too ...


3

Power tools I guess the standard way to do this sort of thing these days is with a bandsaw. And keeping the first waste piece cut from each piece can prove very helpful with this method so that you can tape it back into position to provide support for the piece when you cut the second curve. As long as the wood isn't too hard or the legs too big I think ...


3

Although others have mentioned the butt joint as simple, I don't recommend it for beginners (unless you are using a biscuit jig), because due to its extreme simplicity alignment is very hard to get perfect. I like to start with a lap joint, which because it has an internal stop simplifies alignment to the point that all alignment can be done with one hand (...


3

It really depends on the tools you have at hand. The more important consideration is proper sealing, as any joint will degrade much faster with direct exposure. Paint is best, but a deck sealer would also work well. A basic sturdy joint would be a reinforced butt joint, which is nothing more than a block of wood glued and screwed to each piece of plywood on ...


3

Every old beehive box I have ever seen was made with pine and built with box joints, and no glue. It was held together with, appropriately so, box nails, one in each "finger" in both directions. With the cover over it and proper setting it will last for many years.


2

If the box is big enough, you can use shop made corner clamps like the ones featured in this Wood magazine article. If the box is too small for that, it might be a good candidate for gluing up using tape as clamps, as demonstrated in this Popular Woodworking article. Indeed, if it's small enough, like a small keepsake box, you can use one piece of tape, ...


2

The "bandsaw box" approach: cut a thin slice off the bottom of the piece, then make a cut in from the side and around the opening you want to create. The small cut in the side can be glued closed, and the solid bottom can be glued back on, almost indetectably. Or: cut off the bottom, drill a hole through, feed a coping saw through the hole and cut outward ...


2

In counter to all the other answers saying "lots of sealant", I would go for "no sealant at all". I would also avoid glue. My concern is that for a bee hive you have a lot of insects you want to keep healthy in very close proximity to your glue/sealant. That also means no plywood. Use a durable wood and a decent roof and the beehive should outlast you. ...


2

Running the grain vertically on the sides would be highly unusual. If this were a problem to consider, you've now shifted the issue to expansion differences between the sides and the front/back! I've built dozens of jewelry boxes and perhaps a hundred other boxes. All have the grain of the sides parallel to that of the front and back. That said, there's ...


2

Since you have access to a router, you could use a 45° Chamfer bit. I used a similar bit to create the same (but smaller) bevels on MDF plinths we installed all throughout the house. Unless you already have one, a quick Google/Amazon search should turn up a bit with the shank diameter that your router needs, with a 1" radius. Also, make sure your bit has a ...


2

Wood glues (PVA) are fairly strong in tension (pulling apart) but weaker in shear, (sliding surfaces in opposite directions. Although a rabbet joint should be strong enough, I like belts and suspenders when possible. I would recommend creating a dado offset to use the wood shear strength in addition to the glue. Locate the dado approx. 1/2" from the edge ...


2

Your making a box to hold a sewing machine? They are pretty heavy items. I don't think a rebate would be sufficient enough. If you have 3/4 material, then the groove is usually 3/8 deep - more then sufficient for most needs, but a sewing machine? I would go with a dado for aesthetics or just glue and screw the bottom panel on. If you're using solid wood (...


2

As SaSSafraS1232 mentioned making a box for the purpose you stated is much like making a drawer. 1. Groove all sides, front and back of the box/drawer, then glue the sides to either the front or back piece than slip the bottom piece of plywood into the grooves, (no glue necessary) and glue on the other end. This captures the bottom completely. 2. If you wish ...


2

If it's just an aesthetic decision, it comes down to what you think looks better. For my money, pins are more visually interesting than tails, so I'd face the pins forward (meaning tails are cut into the front and back, pins are cut into the sides).


2

What would be a good way to joint such thin plywood? The simplest joint of all, butt joints, could be sufficient here given the possible sizes of boxes you're making and the use they have to withstand. Particularly if you prep the joining surfaces well* and use an adhesive that can fill gaps (so, not any type of PVA). PVA might yield strong enough joints, ...


2

As Graphus stated in comment, the wood members in the arched top will expand and contract while cross grain ends will not. The differences in expansion can easily cause failure in the top. I can think of two ways to reduce this problem. The first is to fabricate the end panels using the same wood with the grain oriented vertically so that the top and ...


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