21

For clamping box joints, I've found that offsetting the clamps just to the inside of the fingers ensures you will be able to pull the corners tight. With the clamps there, you will still be pulling the joint closed while introducing relatively no bending to the boards. Picture below (source: RodsWoodworking.com). You could, as you suggested, make some jig ...


19

I tried clamping a square to inside of the joint, which works well for keeping the joint square, but doesn't seem to apply enough pressure to pull the fingers tightly together. I think that's basically the right idea but could do with being implemented differently: [Source: Wood Magazine] Another option that you might like to consider is something similar ...


10

You want to pay attention to the type of tooth grind, which describes how the individual teeth are shaped. Vermont American has a good resource for types of grinds. Any grind combination with at least one flat tooth should give you a flat-bottomed cut. So good candidates would be: Flat Top Grind (often used for ripping) Triple Chip Grind (for hard, ...


9

The box size would be height=400mm, length=800mm, width=400mm, made of 10mm plywood. Say the max load on boxes when used as benches = turned open side down is 200kg and the load when used as a box is 50kg max. I'm going to convert to Imperial units since that's how my brain works. This is about 16" x 32" x 16" and 3/8" plywood, supporting 440 lbs when ...


9

A jigsaw and chisels are quite adequate for making finger joints in thick stock like that. Some tips: Carefully mark both sides of the joint, making sure to mark the waste clearly. When cutting the waste with the jigsaw, cut away from the line, into the waste area. This will make the waste area a little too small, and can be fine tuned with the chisel. Fine ...


8

Let's talk teeth! There are more types of grinds, but I feel these are the applicable ones for your question: Flat top (FT/FTB) An FT or FTB blade is one which has flat teeth that you're looking for. Alternate Top Bevel (ATB) An Alternate Top Bevel (It will be marked ATB on the blade) is one which has alternating beveled teeth, like the one you mentioned. ...


6

Forrest sells a blade which is totally flat. If you have an old saw blade that needs resharpening, most sharpening companies can regrind your blade when they sharpen it to make it a flat top grind.


4

Yes, pocket screws AND glue are enough to hold most drawer boxes together. We will often use them in a pinch for drawer boxes in the cabinet industry, and some shops will even use them regularly. That being said, there are usually two weak spots in drawer construction, the bottom, and the drawer front. For our typical drawer construction, we use 1/2" - 3/4"...


4

A box joint might be strong enough but that's just a guess, the loads placed on the finished post will determine if it is or it isn't, along with how accurately it's cut of course. Could be a bit difficult cutting a box joint in situ on a standing fence post accurately enough! Even if for that reason alone you may want to go for something simpler, like a ...


4

Is the grain direction a problem for me? Box joints are usually cut into end-grain, I would cut them into long-grain In terms of cutting the joint initially, possibly depending on the method chosen. In terms of the finished joint, very much yes (see final point). If I use different wood(species), would the joints explode all over my living room while ...


4

A simpler option may be to fake it. Instead of an actual box joint you could make a fake looking one by making the cuts in one board and then filling the voids with wood in the other grain direction. This works really well with contrasting woods. The actual joint will be a butjoint like the second image. But it will look like a box joint. That way you don'...


4

I'll try to answer the question as good as possible myself, but on a few points I'm in over my head. Is the grain direction a problem for me? As far as the cutting goes it shouldn't be a problem, one should use sacrificial boards in the places where the router-bit/saw-blade comes out though, as the long grain will probably tear out otherwise. If I use ...


4

I would be wary of this approach myself. Joinery works best when you have a near perfect fit with no gaps. In my experience My jigsaw is terrible at cutting vertically through a simple 2x4's. I expect you might have gaps that won't make good glue joints. That is unless you make sure you leave a good chunk of waste for the chisels to clean after so as to be ...


3

Some general design/structural considerations for this type of project: While the design shown should be adequate for light loads, it may be helpful to others to understand the way the table works in transferring the loads to the base for future projects. The performance of the table joints under load will not depend upon the species of wood so much as the ...


2

Try this setup.Green is jig. Red is where clamps go.


2

Skip the box joints and consider some type of joinery which offers mechanical resistance in at least one direction. For example, mortise and tenon or hand-cut dovetails resist movement along one axis. The amount of effort you'll expend using a jigsaw and cleaning up the cuts with a chisel will almost certainly exceed the effort required to join the corners ...


2

Yes, I think a box-joint would provide sufficient strength, at least if you add the additional foot on top, and not on the bottom where there might be more leverage on the joint, but even there it would probably suffice. I'd cut the fingers on the thin and long side, as most of the strength in the joint will come from the glue, and more, longer fingers will ...


2

These (and much more complex) joints have been done by hand tools alone for centuries, and there is still a strong following of hand tools only woodworking. The box joint you show here is pretty simple, with all angles at 90 degrees. To use the tools you mentioned, the best tip would be to cut everything too small with the jigsaw (or even the hand saw), and ...


2

It's possible using a relatively complex screw advance box joint jig. It's difficult to explain, but there's a great video demonstrating it here. Basically, you move the workpiece incrementally to make multiple, somewhat precisely spaced cuts for each finger. Note that you'll want a square cutting table saw blade.


2

The box joint is sort of the machine equivalent of the dovetail joint; by having all the cuts at 90 degrees you can more easily mechanize the joinery and thanks to the resulting increase in speed you can make many fine 'fingers' to give you massive glue area. This is good since the joint relies entirely on glue to hold it together. Dovetailing has the ...


2

Box joints for this table with just jigsaw and chisel? A jigsaw is not the right choice for this. Much preferable to cut this using a hand saw of some kind. but of course from a stability point of view that is probably one of the worst table designs to come up with ;). Actually the design is very stable, in all ways you might mean it. The ...


1

Do I need to worry? Nope. If you want to spline those mitres for alignment you can. Properly applied, splines or biscuits are fine, but the value added is limited to help with alignment. Your 3/4 inch material is going to give you an inch of gluing surface. Plenty. Glue both sides, clamp em up, and move on.


1

If you can do a splined mitre joint long enough and accurate enough for this then I think you're good to go. A lock-rabbet joint might be stronger under normal circumstances but here you'd be doing it along the long grain, not across it as this joint is used normally. It's not a suitable joint along the grain of solid wood.


1

Box joints are machine joints. Period. They are great for multiples of boxes, or if, as in this example, the design is asking for something more industrial. If I am only doing one, its just as fast to cut dovetails, because of machine setup time. I size fingers based on the job, and I would certainly heed Ashlar. But I really like the old Sears Roebuck ...


1

Before I get to the whole box joint part I will tell you there is a difference with hardness is woods. Wood-database is a great website to get information on a given wood. I think acacia is harder then birch. Not to familiar with it. But you could really use any wood you would so like. Also I would get some bar clamps for the gluing part. And for glue I ...


1

Box joint jigs generally count on being able to cut the slot in a single pass. If you want a 1/4 inch cut, that means you need a 1/4 inch thick cut, which is why a dado blade is used. Theoretically there could be a jig which registered off the two sides of the cut and let you take multiple passes with a normal blade, but that would be a rather finicky ...


1

Any wood would serve, but selecting straight tight grain wood, like maple, would serve better. As mentioned before, the technique is create a joint and shape it afterwards to perfect outside curves. The inside curve can be done via a drill press and a correct forstner bit. It is possible to cut curved joints together if the curves match and it is easy to ...


1

I wanted to elaborate a little bit on what grfrazee touched on with his answer. Gluing cauls or "Matching Finger" cauls could be a great idea. Indeed, as you have read, some instructions/teachers will advise to let the pins protrude the surface. This can make it easier to create a flush surface after but it can also be used as an aesthetic! If they were ...


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