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15

Are there any finish solutions for making "microwave-safe" wood items for serving food on? It's not so much a question of "microwave-safe" finishes as "microwave-safe" materials. Microwaves work by exciting water molecules, thereby increasing their energy (i.e., heating them up). The reason your wooden bowl gets hot is because of the water trapped in the ...


13

It's called Tearout. That is tearing the fibers. Most of the time when you see that the fibers of the wood are tearing out instead of being cut/sheared by the gouges. There are three thing that can cause this. One is the wood itself. Some species are a little more prone to this than others. Also wood that is starting to spalt or rot is more likely to ...


7

They are bowl coring systems like this I bought this one and it has 4 different knife sets available for different sized bowls. They are pretty expensive and each knife set is bought separately. I like it but you need some practice and they really aren't for the beginner, you need to have practice attaching the blanks to the lathe securely because there ...


7

I suspect that it actually isn't going to get any worse. However, what is generally accepted practice is to use epoxy. If you want to hide the crack and patch you can mix in some sawdust, in this case maple sawdust would be best. As an alternative, you could mix in some other colorful stuff to make it pop. Ground turquoise is a common choice for this. Of ...


6

If dollars is your biggest concern, (and with the cost of some blanks, it should be!) I would recommend firewood. If you have access to a bandsaw then this is doubly easy. The majority of the wood I turn is stuff I've set aside while cutting fire wood. Either as I cut it into chunks or later when I split it in half to dry. If you are an urban dweller, ...


6

I have read you can use something called "turners tape" to hold the bottom of a bowl to a face plate. In this video, Mike Peace demonstrates using turner's tape for holding small items. He says he uses it sometimes for reversing a small bowl, lids for boxes, etc. What's nice about it is that you don't need to leave a tenon for the chuck to grab ...


4

Frank Howarth made a great video about how he "repaired" a cracked wooden bowl. The rough turned maple bowl that I wanted to finish next had cracked. The crack was at an angle to vertical when the bowl was sitting normally. I cut out the section of the bowl with the crack on the band saw. Then I build a new segmented piece to take the place of the section....


4

I seem to remember a tool available at Rockler and that like, that was called a 'hollowing system'. It included a tool rest with a post, and a series of curved bar type tools (image a parting tool that has a long, large arc). The point of this tool was that the curve of the tool and the setup of the post on the tool rest made a bit of a pivot. This allowed ...


4

If it were mine, I think I'd either try a tinted epoxy or epoxy-based filler. Or I'd accept the crack but stabilize it with a butterfly inlay... or just accept the crack as part of the character of the piece.


4

To turn an a bowl that is not round I am aware of 2 (3 counting BrownRedHawks comment!). The first is to use an off-center jig, you will turn one half of the bowl, then change the jig and turn the other half, making an oval. The one I've linked to is for the Ruth Niles jig, it's fairly small, I've also seen some videos on making your own jig. The other is ...


4

You can try making a paste of wood glue and sawdust to full the grain. This website, along with the glue bottle, cites that Titebond III is food-safe, so it should work for your purposes.


4

I hand-carved my first Kuksa a month ago from half an ash log. There's your problem. Kuksa's are best made from a close-grained wood (traditionally birch burl). Ash, being open-grained, is very subject to seepage like you described. I would like to add that I haven't got this issue with a well-dried beech bowl. This makes sense since beech is close-...


3

I would seriously suggest you just get them a glass or plastic bowl if you want to gift them one you know they'll want to use in a microwave :-) Regular microwaving is not a good environment for wood since it'll heat it and drive out moisture. Up to a point this doesn't do any harm as you'll have some idea about from your force-drying experience, but if you'...


2

Yes, there are special tools. Basically it's a thin gouge on a curved shaft, plus guides so you're advancing it along the circumference of a circle. Bowl blanks are then undercut and separated working from the smallest outward, readjusting the guide between each division. This does assume all the nested blanks will start out with the same inner and outer ...


2

Due to the size of the crack a mechanical repair would be best like the aforementioned butterfly or stitch inlay or in lieu of that an epoxy would work. I wouldn't try to color match with dust or pigment as it just plain won't match and may just become an eye sore. If you want to color it go with black or some sort of metallic mix. CA glue, aka super glue, ...


2

I have used a wide range of wood for bowl, the biggest recommendation is turn a lot, and if you start with firewood you are not afraid of ending up with firewood. I have used everything from: rather expensive wood to make segmented bowls; to fire wood


2

Streaming the alder for 15 minutes in a vegetable steamer prevented any reddening. I think I'd also get a different color if i used more aged wood. Thanks for the suggestion @encnerwal! Update: oxalic acid will remove all reddening and vinegar will remove most. The bowl ends up a bit more of a yellow color overall.


1

I need advice on which food safety adhesive to use. The problem you face is that no adhesive will bond to wood that has been in contact with oil, and of course most salad dressings contain a lot of oil. You won't be able to just push some glue into the crack and clamp it for a while. Even without the oil problem, it can be difficult to work glue all the way ...


1

I have stained my cutting boards and place hot pizza pans on them with no effect. However they still will warp with constant water left on them. I would suggest you have two options. Rubbing mineral spirits or butchers block oil and finish with cheesecloth or tack cloth. When in doubt test on the wood in question. Stain a scrap of wood then buy a cheap ...


1

While you can often get away with wood in a microwave you shouldn't. Or if you do, mass-produced cheap things but not something presumably valued. Similarly for the dishwasher - I put some wooden things in there but nothing that couldn't be replaced cheaply and easily. But to be honest, finished wood and hot wet foods don't mix well, so using it in the ...


1

Not enough rep to add a comment but most glues are food safe when dry. The drying agents may have toxins in them but they evaporate and the dried glue is okay. Obviously you'll want a glue that's waterproof when dry such as Titebond III The Wood Whisperer has a good post on this


1

Since the surface would need to be cleaned up manually (not on a lathe), try CA glue and clamp it together. Much less mess than epoxy to clean up. The CA glue will be safe after fully curing.


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