6

No you don't need to thin BLO, or any other drying oil, to apply it. From what I've read, thinning the BLO will let the finish penetrate the wood deeper That's the theory! But it's one of the most persistent myths in finishing. In reality it doesn't appear to make any real difference (except possibly in end grain). People have run tests that have shown ...


5

If it's simply to continue the finish, couldn't you just compact those into the finishing process (e.g., roughly once a day for three weeks), then swap to the maintenance phase? It's possible this may work for some*, but not in my experience. The main practical issue is that as you build up the oil in the surface wood fibres with the initial coats the wood ...


4

I'm not an expert with BLO but I have successfully used it on different projects, so here's my take. How do I know if a coat is thick enough? More thinner coats are better than thick coats. it will cure faster and smoother that way. I apply a light coat and if it is runny at all I wipe off the excess. How do I know if coat has set/cured? The ...


4

Thete are lots of lamps out there with wooden bases with various finishes.If the wiring isn't bad, and the socket is approved for use in contact with wood (most are, if mounted correctly) and you let there be enough airflow around the bulb for it to cool itself, this really shouldn't be a problem.


4

You can still scorch wood that has been oiled, but the results are likely to be different to when the wood is bare. As with almost all finishing you'd ideally want to do some experimentation before committing to doing this on the job, but that's not easy without a piece of scrap wood to do some testing with. You could perhaps use the underside to try this ...


3

Graphus gave an excellent answer. Once, having asked the same question to a guy very experienced in wood finishing, he explained to me that thinning the oil doesn't make oil molecules any smaller—it only spreads them further apart. Molecule size determines how deep it will penetrate and, like Graphus pointed out, an impression that thinned oil "should" ...


3

Yes you can absolutely use "teak oil" 1 in place of BLO. In fact I think if you did a direct comparison you'd decide that the results are superior, in all the ways you list — higher sheen (or at least more easily) and better surface protection. What is sold as teak oil can vary, because there's no standard for it in the finishing industry (as there isn't ...


2

No you don't want to do that. Linseed oil is not a suitable final finish over paint as it doesn't form a hard, durable film. It's only good when it soaks directly into the wood so that it isn't sitting on the surface but is within the wood fibres. Your best choices to protect paintwork are a varnish or lacquer, both of which are intended to make durable ...


2

Some of the contested information is probably due to manufacturers and woodworkers alike misusing the term 'tung oil' when what they mean is some combination of tung oil and another solvent and/or finish. Generally, pure tung oil isn't a great finish on it's own- it doesn't entirely harden, it takes a long time to not be a sticky mess, and it has to be ...


2

I realize that I should have used turpentine or other drying agents Turpentine doesn't really promote the drying of linseed oil despite many references to the contrary. In a woodworking context what it does is thin the mixture so that less oil is actually applied, and that obviously dries more quickly than more oil. Is there anything I can do to speed ...


2

My primary concern is the fact that it takes longer (days to weeks?) to oxidize than boiled linseed oil. Weeks at least, possibly months. Indoors, if the conditions aren't ideal, it could take a year or more before the overwhelming smell of linseed oil dissipates1. If I put the bed on the frame before it fully oxidizes/cures, is there a risk of ...


1

I have used teak oil on a door for a small cabinet that was kept inside the cabinet was scraped but the door remains around the finish still looks good, it was built about 10 years ago.


1

In general there's no problem with adding a different oil-based finish on top of wood that was previously oiled. And despite widespread belief that this is necessary you don't have to allow the oil in the wood to 'dry' (cure) first, the two finishes should effectively meld together just as they would to a previous coat of the same finish. You may find it ...


1

Or it wouldn't make much difference? Yes it'll make a big difference normally, it could cut airborne sanding dust down to virtually nil. It's actually fairly common now to wet-sand wood with the finish used (usually oil or a blended oil finish such as "Danish oil", but sometimes using straight varnish). This is not primarily to keep the dust in check ...


1

In my experience what you propose works fine. You can sand the wood while the wood is still wet from the oil. However, I do not use oil with initial sanding, only for the final sanding, although it's worth giving it a shot with the initial rough sanding - you can't go wrong. Recognize that this technique quickly clogs the sandpaper (that's where part of ...


1

Just to answer the question in the title, yes you can use linseed oil and waterbased poly on opposing sides of board if for some reason you wanted to. I know that linseed oil and water-based polyurethane won't work together. Actually they can. After curing drying oils aren't oils any longer, the oxidation process has turned them into something else (a ...


1

You really cannot speed up the drying of raw linseed oil - it takes somewhere between a long time and forever to dry. Your best bet is to wipe off as much of the raw linseed oil as you can using rags. You can try more fine sanding, but the sandpaper will clog up very rapidly. Once you get to a point where you are satisfied that no more raw linseed oil is ...


1

The procedure that I learned for applying linseed oil is as follows: Apply a coat of RAW linseed oil, allowing it to soak-in for a day or so. This is also the time to give the wood piece a good hard look and discover those missed sanding places and tiny nicks and clean them up. Then apply a coat of boiled linseed oil every day for a week. Then a coat ...


1

I've used both BLO and Tung Oil. I prefer Tung Oil because its adds a warmth to the wood that BLO does not. I find BLO tends to make the wood look a little muted (at least on Walnut). When I get home, I can take a picture of BLO and Tung Oil side by side. In the mean time, you might want to check out Bob Flexner's book. As I recall, he compares the two side-...


1

I don't think you'd notice much, or perhaps any, difference in the finished appearance switching from BLO to tung oil. This is partly going on general principles, where oils of similar types tend to give similar finish, and partly based on photos of pieces finished in both that I've seen. There's no basic difference that I can perceive. There could of ...


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